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Phokis

Ubc vs u of a

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Hi everyone.

Just got my acceptance to UBC and now I'm kind of torn.

Initially I'd thought that I'd choose u of a regardless but now I'm not so sure.

I've read the reasons to go to schools and what not but here's some background info:

- ideally I want to work in Toronto, Calgary is a second choice. I'm not so interested in working in Vancouver due to the market and cost of living.

- nyc is a pipedream, but I haven't heard of anyone from U of A working in new york

- I'm honestly kind of sick of Vancouver, but I've never lived in Edmonton and moving to a new place may be nice

- cost wise, I could pay the same for rent and live on my own in Edmonton, whereas I'd definitely have to live with at least one roommate in a probably smaller place in Vancouver.

Anyways, I guess to sum it up my primary concern is my employment outcome. Do I have a better chance of working in Toronto if I go to UBC?

My next big concern I guess is quality of life during school. In Edmonton I'd be living around city center, and people seem to say positive things about the lifestyle there, minus the winter. I went to UBC for undergrad and I honestly found myself bored most of the time, but Vancouver has a much better music and food scene.

Advice would be awesome.

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I went from Vancouver to U of A and am articling in Edmonton. If food is a big deal to you, I would say stick to UBC and don't come here. Most everything is regular Canadian fare, with some decent upscale restaurants that charge an arm and a leg. Ethnic restaurants are overpriced and significantly worse in quality (especially Chinese/Japanese). Plus, if you're bored in Vancouver, you will be as bored or more bored here. 

Personally, I prefer sunny days with snow and sub-zero temperatures over 200+ days of gloomy rain, but you'd have to decide which you prefer. 

I'll let the other regular posters debate over which school has better job prospects.

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Thanks for the info!

Would you say the population as a whole is friendlier in Edmonton? And during winter, does the city just turn into a deadzone as everyone hibernates?

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UBC can get you to Toronto and New York. 7-8 students from UBC are working in Toronto this summer. There are also a few u of a students as well.

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9 hours ago, Phokis said:

Thanks for the info!

Would you say the population as a whole is friendlier in Edmonton? And during winter, does the city just turn into a deadzone as everyone hibernates?

Generally, yes. Vancouver is known as a cold city for a reason (although like everything else, you get what you put in I guess?). I'm much happier having left Vancouver, especially in its current state, as someone in their 20s looking to establish a comfortable life somewhere. I miss it sometimes and visit regularly, especially for food tours, but I can't see a balanced life there for myself for at least 5 years. 

I wouldn't say Edmonton completely hibernates in the winter,. You'll in all likelihood get sucked into the law school social vortex unless you make an active effort to expand your social circles. The LSA generally makes a good effort to organize social events, although participation varies wildly from year to year (my year love to go out, the year below ours didn't). 

Learning AB law at U of A might be better for you as a lawyer in Calgary. Again, won't get into your chances in Calgary or whatever because it's too hard to predict. 

 

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I, personally... would go to UBC. Better weather, cheaper tuition, sounds like you can live at home(?). You can get placed in either Toronto or Calgary from UBC (not sure about NY from either school).

I've visited Edmonton a number of time and wanted to die (no offence). It's very very suburban with not much to do except shop at the West Ed Mall. Everything closed super early, even on the weekends (my partner and I couldnt find a resturant to eat in past 7). And the winters are brutal. I have family there and they have to change their windshields once a year because they crack from the cold. And the day light is weird lol. In the summer the sun sets at like 11 pm and then in the winter there is like 3 hours of sun. I dunno.  It seems like a nice place to "settle down" later in life but it doesnt appeal to me as someone in mid-20s.

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1 hour ago, healthlaw said:

I, personally... would go to UBC. Better weather, cheaper tuition, sounds like you can live at home(?). You can get placed in either Toronto or Calgary from UBC (not sure about NY from either school).

I've visited Edmonton a number of time and wanted to die (no offence). It's very very suburban with not much to do except shop at the West Ed Mall. Everything closed super early, even on the weekends (my partner and I couldnt find a resturant to eat in past 7). And the winters are brutal. I have family there and they have to change their windshields once a year because they crack from the cold. And the day light is weird lol. In the summer the sun sets at like 11 pm and then in the winter there is like 3 hours of sun. I dunno.  It seems like a nice place to "settle down" later in life but it doesnt appeal to me as someone in mid-20s.

I can assure you there are many more things to do in Edmonton than to to WEM, and I have no idea where you were trying to eat because I've never heard of a restaurant closing by 7 on a weekend unless you were in an area that primarily caters to a lunch crowd.

But yes, the OP should probably just stick with UBC.  It sounds like the OP's hometown, and there's lots to be said for staying close to your overall support network.  GOing away to school means completely cutting yourself off from friends and family during a fairly stressful time in your life.  If OP's priority was a job in Calgary than U of A would be the obvious choice, but if he or she wants to go to Toronto then UBC is just as good a choice.

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On 7/10/2018 at 11:45 AM, Phokis said:

ideally I want to work in Toronto, Calgary is a second choice. I'm not so interested in working in Vancouver due to the market and cost of living.

2

UBC places in Toronto and Calgary. What don't you like about Vancouver's market? Toronto is also an expensive place to live.

On 7/10/2018 at 11:45 AM, Phokis said:

nyc is a pipedream, but I haven't heard of anyone from U of A working in new york

1

UBC can and does place in New York.

On 7/10/2018 at 11:45 AM, Phokis said:

I'm honestly kind of sick of Vancouver, but I've never lived in Edmonton and moving to a new place may be nice

 

There's something to be said about the experience of moving but I will take Vancouver over Edmonton without a second thought.

 

On 7/11/2018 at 12:04 AM, Phokis said:

Would you say the population as a whole is friendlier in Edmonton?

 

 

On 7/11/2018 at 9:40 AM, BigRigButters said:

Generally, yes. Vancouver is known as a cold city for a reason (although like everything else, you get what you put in I guess?).

 

This was weird to read. FWIW I am unapologetic about how much I love Vancouver, but I met my lifelong friends in the city and find most everyone to be friendly. I sought out communities and I was rewarded. Not that Edmonton won't give you this, but I don't understand this as a critique of Vancouver. 

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47 minutes ago, Girby said:

This was weird to read. FWIW I am unapologetic about how much I love Vancouver, but I met my lifelong friends in the city and find most everyone to be friendly. I sought out communities and I was rewarded. Not that Edmonton won't give you this, but I don't understand this as a critique of Vancouver. 

Agreed. 

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21 minutes ago, Girby said:

This was weird to read. FWIW I am unapologetic about how much I love Vancouver, but I met my lifelong friends in the city and find most everyone to be friendly. I sought out communities and I was rewarded. Not that Edmonton won't give you this, but I don't understand this as a critique of Vancouver. 

How is what I said a critique? I also lived there for years and met lifelong friends, although it wasn't easy as a transplant. Someone asked for a comparison and I gave my opinion. Also, it's even in the quote: "you get what you put in". 

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4 hours ago, healthlaw said:

 

I've visited Edmonton a number of time and wanted to die (no offence). It's very very suburban with not much to do except shop at the West Ed Mall. Everything closed super early, even on the weekends (my partner and I couldnt find a resturant to eat in past 7). And the winters are brutal. I have family there and they have to change their windshields once a year because they crack from the cold. And the day light is weird lol. In the summer the sun sets at like 11 pm and then in the winter there is like 3 hours of sun. I dunno.  It seems like a nice place to "settle down" later in life but it doesnt appeal to me as someone in mid-20s.

Lmao. To the OP and others reading this thread disregard everything this guy just said. Clearly someone is salty about edmonton. OP let me clarify some points for you and others who may be turned off about going to edmonton for law school from this posters unsubstantiated remarks. Source: I've lived in edmonton all my life (high school, undergrad, and law school). 

1) nothing closes "super early" unless its a holiday like Christmas - in which every city would suffer the same problem. There is no restaurant in edmonton that closes past 7 - from a business profit making perspective, that doesn't even make any sense. a simple google search of "restaurants to eat for dinner in edmonton" literally gives you hundreds of results, none of which closes at 7pm.

2) ive been enduring the edmonton winters for years, and not once has my windshield cracked from the cold, and neither has any of my friends. exaggeration at its finest

3) 3 hours of sun in the winter? bro this is edmonton...3 hours north of calgary...this isnt Antarctica. The hours of sunlight we get is comparable to any other city in western canada, including vancouver.

4) "not much to do except shop at west ed mall" .....i'm not even going to bother with that one.

In any event, nothing in your post is correct except for the fact that we have brutal winters. next time you try to bash edmonton with your ignorant views, at least say something that is substantiated by common sense and/or experience.

OP just for reference, if your end goal is toronto/nyc go to UBC. no one from my year that i know of ended up in nyc, and i only know 1 person who ended up in toronto. 

 

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On 2018-07-11 at 5:00 AM, GoldmanSachs said:

UBC can get you to Toronto and New York. 7-8 students from UBC are working in Toronto this summer. There are also a few u of a students as well.

Hi again Goldman! Hope everything's going well in Toronto. Do you have a sguestimate as to how many from UBC applied?

 

3 hours ago, Malicious Prosecutor said:

But yes, the OP should probably just stick with UBC.  It sounds like the OP's hometown, and there's lots to be said for staying close to your overall support network.  GOing away to school means completely cutting yourself off from friends and family during a fairly stressful time in your life.  If OP's priority was a job in Calgary than U of A would be the obvious choice, but if he or she wants to go to Toronto then UBC is just as good a choice.

Part of my problem was that in the last two years of my undergrad I just felt "trapped" by Vancouver, and that I was really very disconnected from the school community in general. I guess that might not be as big an issue in law school.

1 hour ago, Girby said:

UBC places in Toronto and Calgary. What don't you like about Vancouver's market? Toronto is also an expensive place to live.

I don't like the idea of out competing so many of my peers in UBC and UVic, ending up with a covetted biglaw job along with its hardships, but then not being able to afford a comfortable life/house for the foreseeable short term between work/loan repayment/cost of living. If I come out with 150k in debt I don't know when I'd be able to own a home in this city. The 20-30k salary difference would at least cover rent comparatively, so I could save/pay off my debts faster.

1 hour ago, Girby said:

This was weird to read. FWIW I am unapologetic about how much I love Vancouver, but I met my lifelong friends in the city and find most everyone to be friendly. I sought out communities and I was rewarded. Not that Edmonton won't give you this, but I don't understand this as a critique of Vancouver. 

I grew up in Regina. Even now when I visit it isn't abnormal to walk by a stranger in a park, say hi and have a nice chat. People are also much more open in say a cafe or bar. That said, I too have many lifelong friends in Vancouver, but they are extensions of social circles and work. For example, I only really made 3 or 4 friends I'm still in touch with from UBC, but that's my personal experience. In Regina I still keep in touch with random people I met when I visited.

Anyways. All this input has been extremely helpful, and thanks for the responses. At this point I'm leaning towards UBC. Hopefully I can find a decent place to live.

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Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, CGI said:

Lmao. To the OP and others reading this thread disregard everything this guy just said. Clearly someone is salty about edmonton. OP let me clarify some points for you and others who may be turned off about going to edmonton for law school from this posters unsubstantiated remarks. Source: I've lived in edmonton all my life (high school, undergrad, and law school). 

1) nothing closes "super early" unless its a holiday like Christmas - in which every city would suffer the same problem. There is no restaurant in edmonton that closes past 7 - from a business profit making perspective, that doesn't even make any sense. a simple google search of "restaurants to eat for dinner in edmonton" literally gives you hundreds of results, none of which closes at 7pm.

2) ive been enduring the edmonton winters for years, and not once has my windshield cracked from the cold, and neither has any of my friends. exaggeration at its finest

3) 3 hours of sun in the winter? bro this is edmonton...3 hours north of calgary...this isnt Antarctica. The hours of sunlight we get is comparable to any other city in western canada, including vancouver.

4) "not much to do except shop at west ed mall" .....i'm not even going to bother with that one.

In any event, nothing in your post is correct except for the fact that we have brutal winters. next time you try to bash edmonton with your ignorant views, at least say something that is substantiated by common sense and/or experience.

OP just for reference, if your end goal is toronto/nyc go to UBC. no one from my year that i know of ended up in nyc, and i only know 1 person who ended up in toronto. 

 

I don't need to be salty about Edmonton. You seem to have taken my post personally and it has clearly left you feeling salty. I prefaced my post by saying that I visited the city.. meaning I was speaking from my experience. Having lived in Toronto and NY, these were the views from my experience. You can present alternative perspectives without being a child

Edited by healthlaw

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3 minutes ago, healthlaw said:

I don't need to be salty about Edmonton. You seem to have taken my post personally and it has clearly left you feeling salty. I prefaced my post by saying that I visited the city.. meaning I was speaking from my experience. Having lived in Toronto and NY, these were the views from my experience. You can present alternative perspectives without being a child

you're getting the wrong impression, its not that im taking it personally, its the simple fact that a person who is genuinely looking for opinions about potentially attending uofa should not be fed nonsensical views where the OP doesnt know any better. and im just calling you out on it. have you read what you wrote? youve "experienced" 3 hours of sunlight in a city located in central alberta? its scientifically impossible for a city like edmonton to receive 3 hours of sunlight during the day, even if its during winter time. restaurants closing at 7pm? as MP pointed out, there's a 0.0001% chance that on a weekend, a restaurant closes at 7pm for dinner, unless you were looking for a lunch place at dinner time...

theres a difference between speaking from experience, and exaggerating your experiences in a city in such a negative light, that it makes no logical sense and claiming it as "alternative perspectives".

OP, if you have any specific questions about edmonton or uofa in general, PM me and id be glad to help.

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9 hours ago, Phokis said:

I grew up in Regina. Even now when I visit it isn't abnormal to walk by a stranger in a park, say hi and have a nice chat. People are also much more open in say a cafe or bar. That said, I too have many lifelong friends in Vancouver, but they are extensions of social circles and work. For example, I only really made 3 or 4 friends I'm still in touch with from UBC, but that's my personal experience. In Regina I still keep in touch with random people I met when I visited.

That's Sask for you! Folks there genuinely love to visit. Though I've lived in three provinces other than Sask, I've yet to see another population that generally just loves to have conversations more than Saskies. 

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Oh man, this thread was funny to read. I'm from Van, but I lived in Edmonton for a couple of years (non-law related) and I can see why the city didn't leave a good impression on healthlaw. She did exaggerate though. Restaurants don't close after 7, but the city does die down in the evening (minus Whyte Ave which tends to be more lively all the time). Winters are brutal, but you get way more sun in the winters compared to Vancouver. This isn't even a debate. I'm on my phone so I won't bother looking up the stats, but even without checking it's obvious. As far as the attitude of the people are concerned I do think Albertans are generally more friendly. But i attribute it to the rural nature of the province. Vancouver is a discount Toronto with more traffic and higher costs. That means people have that big-city shit attitude that New Yorkers are famous for. There is also more class division and anxiety in Vancouver. Personally I find Edmonton a lot more pleasant to be in because people aren't always stressed about money and cost of living. 

 

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Posted (edited)

Stay in BC. Edmonton is in northern Alberta which means it’s isolated, with scorching hot summers, bone chilling winters, and not much to do beyound the few summer months (a few repetitive tired summer festivals every year). And you better like country stuff and big trucks. The roads also suck due to the freeze thaw cycles and you have to drive almost everywhere. Construction is terrible due to road repairs and roads within the city are circa 1950s/60s and poorly designed.

Vancouver on the other hand is one of the most cosmopolitan cities to live as far as food, amenities, environment, climate, and entertainment in the world. World class city for sure. Very diverse population. Only downside is that real estate is expensive but then it’s still cheaper than Toronto or New York outside the main city core area.

I wouldn’t even bother comparing schools because the location is more important. But if you must compare schools, UBC is superior to U of C or U of A. And location wise there is no comparison.

I’m just going to say this is in a vulgar but true manner. Compared to Vancouver, the lifestyle in Edmonton is like living in a shithole. Unless you’re married and have 3 kids and just bought a house. Maybe not as much while in school but you might be stuck after you move due to the job market. You’ll also feel like in a small town where everyone already knows or is friends (and/or relatives) with everyone else so forget about meeting “new people”.

Cost wise, money won’t matter when you’re outside waiting for the bus/LRT at -40 C (with wind chill) in the dark and realize that the next bus/LRT is delayed for another 20-30 min. And then you will be freezing and late to wherever you’re going.

If you’re a girl and single, Edmonton is good though since lots of guys come to Edmonton for work like trades and more so blue collar stuff. Lots of guys with tattoos, beards, and big trucks around town. And country guys. Not to mention the 4 large penitentiaries/jails surrounding Edmonton. If you’re into bad boys, it’s a great dating scene. Plenty of Fish aspiring serial killer and filmmaker Mark Twitchell: from Edmonton born and raised. Tried and sentenced. Great lively "Arts" scene. The Art Galley is very small and extremely underwhelming. The only large regular museum has still to actually open. The tiny Edmonton Zoo made the international news numerous times due to animal welfare issues (Where is Lucy?). We also house the criminally insane by the picturesque river valley in the middle of the city who sometimes escape from the Alberta Hospital. 

There are industrial air pollution issues from the refineries and chemical plants all around Edmonton so that’s also something to consider. You only hear about it when sometimes workers have to go to the hospital due to hydrogen sulfide exposures since those are reportable incidents. But you can smell the sulfur or other chemical smells lots of times when windy. And I don’t mean smog; I mean the type of emissions that gives northern Alberta and Edmonton refinery row area the highest rates of asthma in the country. The air is also very dry all the time; especially in the winter. Your skin will get wrecked. Very high UV values when sunny. Add the reflective snow 8 months of the year and it's even worse.

The people who cheer Edmonton are generally people who lived in Edmonton most of their lives, and/or have all their family and friends in Edmonton. Most everyone else already left town after university ha ha. 1 or 2 full years in Edmonton and you will have seen, experienced, and done everything that there is to do.

Downtown Edmonton on a weekday after 6 PM is basically homeless panhandling Gotham city. And on weekends you just see the 18-19 year old college party kids lining up outside a few sketchy country bars. Most of which get shut down after several months and rebranded due to gang violence and shootings. Used to be murder capital of Canada a few years ago but it’s trying to get the top spot again.

If you feel trapped in Vancouver sounds like you are spoiled and not doing anything to put yourself out there to proactively seek out new activities and/or people. At least you can go for a hike on the west coast in the winter months in the rainforest or by the beach.

When people say they enjoy "walks on the beach" in Edmonton on Tinder profiles they mean Alberta Beach. I''ll let you Google that one.

GO TO THE CITY/PROVINCE WHERE YOU WANT TO LIVE FOR THE NEXT 5 or more YEARS. That’s how you should decide.

Vancouver>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Calgary>>>Edmonton

Toronto is too expensive, including tuition, and the job market sucks there. Same with New York.

Edited by StudentLife
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Being broke in Vancouver is worse than being broke in Edmonton. Being upper middle class in Vancouver is a lot better than anything in Edmonton.

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Never been to either place so I won't make any judgments on whether Vancouver or Edmonton is better, would you be able to visit Edmonton sometime before making your decision? Obviously that's not a possibility for a lot of people, but if you can afford the time and money you can see whether the atmosphere of U of A and Edmonton in general suits you or not.

Also, no roommates >>>> roommates any day. I'd deal with a lot of crop just to not have to deal with roommates.

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Posted (edited)
On 7/10/2018 at 1:45 PM, Phokis said:

Hi everyone.

Just got my acceptance to UBC and now I'm kind of torn.

Initially I'd thought that I'd choose u of a regardless but now I'm not so sure.

I've read the reasons to go to schools and what not but here's some background info:

- ideally I want to work in Toronto, Calgary is a second choice. I'm not so interested in working in Vancouver due to the market and cost of living.

- nyc is a pipedream, but I haven't heard of anyone from U of A working in new york

- I'm honestly kind of sick of Vancouver, but I've never lived in Edmonton and moving to a new place may be nice

- cost wise, I could pay the same for rent and live on my own in Edmonton, whereas I'd definitely have to live with at least one roommate in a probably smaller place in Vancouver.

Anyways, I guess to sum it up my primary concern is my employment outcome. Do I have a better chance of working in Toronto if I go to UBC?

My next big concern I guess is quality of life during school. In Edmonton I'd be living around city center, and people seem to say positive things about the lifestyle there, minus the winter. I went to UBC for undergrad and I honestly found myself bored most of the time, but Vancouver has a much better music and food scene.

Advice would be awesome.

If you ideally want to work in Toronto, neither UBC or U of A are great choices, but I'd think UBC has the slight edge.

In terms of the cities, I've been to both. I much prefer Vancouver as it has: better weather, better restaurants, better shopping, better scenery/places to go for nice walks etc. ie. Stanley Park, and it is generally a bigger/more cosmopolitan and diverse city, and I love being near the ocean. Edmonton is not the shithole some people are portraying it as, though. It has a good arts scene, for one thing. Whyte Ave is fun (and open late.) There are some nice parks. I would check it out though before you decide that's where you want to live, because what if you hate it? But I would give Vancouver the edge here. 

NYC should be a pipe dream for anyone at any law school in Canada. If you want it that much, the Toronto schools are the best bet, but you really should be going to a good US school. I would think UBC has a slight edge over U of A here too. 

Having more space and no roommates is a huge plus. I had roommates in a small place all through law school, which I needed for child care and financial reasons, and it sucked. You have no privacy, you have to guard your food, your cosmetics, your hygiene products, you bicker with each other because you're on top of each other, you have to force other people to pull their weight.... it would be much easier to study and focus without all of that. So U of A gets the advantage here. 

Yes, I would think there's a slightly better choice of working in Toronto if you go to UBC.

I don't know about boredom. I honestly can't understand how you would be bored in either city - there is lots to do in both, plus when you are in law school, there are things to do within the law school and within the larger university, and you also have work/activities to do, so I doubt boredom will be an issue. 

I would not assume you're going to get a job in either Toronto or NYC. If you are an average student and get an average job in Vancouver or Edmonton, which city do you prefer? That's where you should go to school. But on balance, I would pick UBC, for the above reasons.

 

 

Edited by providence
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