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SlickRick

Best LSAT course?

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Hello,

I don't mean to spam this thread but since my last post I have informed the Managing Partner at the law firm that I work at that it's unlikely that I will get admitted this cycle (fuck my life) and that the LSAT was the biggest issue with my application. (I received a 154). To which he said that he needed to take a course and then graciously offered that the firm would pay to put me through one. It seems that the majority of in-person courses are in Toronto, which is fine, I could commute but was wondering if anyone had experience with some, wouldn't recommend x, etc. I would prefer to attend an in-class course but will take an online one if it's comparatively better. 

I've been looking on Google and searched this forum but wanted to know if there is a consensus as to which is regarded the best on here, of which, i'm not aware of. Any feedback would be great!

Thanks in advance.

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I self-studied so I'm a bit biased but I believe prep courses are a rip-off. If you really want to spend the money on some teaching I think your best bet is either the 7Sage online prep material or self-study supplemented with private tutoring. 

Studying for the LSAT is unique to the individual. You should figure out what works for you. I don't think prep courses can teach you that. 

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2 minutes ago, Daddy said:

I self-studied so I'm a bit biased but I believe prep courses are a rip-off. If you really want to spend the money on some teaching I think your best bet is either the 7Sage online prep material or self-study supplemented with private tutoring. 

Studying for the LSAT is unique to the individual. You should figure out what works for you. I don't think prep courses can teach you that. 

Yeah that's a fair point, I'll look into private tutoring in addition to courses and see what will suit me best. Thanks!

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5 minutes ago, SlickRick said:

Yeah that's a fair point, I'll look into private tutoring in addition to courses and see what will suit me best. Thanks!

I should add that if staying on top of things was an issue for you then a prep course could be a good idea. They add structure and discipline. That is very important for people who get easily distracted!

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7 sage. 154 isnt all that far off a sufficient score if you have a high GPA. I got into a few schools with a 155 before February scores (156) were released. And 7 all together. You could start with the 7 sage starter package and upgrade from there if necessary. 

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I got a 163 my first try on the LSAT (October 2015). Used PowerScore books to study and took their live online course the summer leading up to the LSAT.

PowerScore was extremely helpful and all of their LSAT tutors are people that scored 170+. I know that Kaplan tutors may not have ever written the LSAT themselves.

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1 minute ago, canuckfanatic said:

I got a 163 my first try on the LSAT (October 2015). Used PowerScore books to study and took their live online course the summer leading up to the LSAT.

PowerScore was extremely helpful and all of their LSAT tutors are people that scored 170+. I know that Kaplan tutors may not have ever written the LSAT themselves.

I suppose it's not necessary but that is weird to me that some might not have. Interesting, thank you!

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24 minutes ago, DJ89 said:

7 sage. 154 isnt all that far off a sufficient score if you have a high GPA. I got into a few schools with a 155 before February scores (156) were released. And 7 all together. You could start with the 7 sage starter package and upgrade from there if necessary. 

Thank you!

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I haven't actually done my LSAT yet so I can't give you an extremely knowledgeable response, however I studied the powerscore bibles a few months ago and was finding the books don't explain things that well, at least in my personal opinion. I recently enrolled in 7sage and realized how much better it is that the PS bibles, its so clear and well explained and the material is all organized in such a practical and efficient way. Definitely recommend 7Sage over Powerscore but that being said, it all matters on you personally and what works for you!

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4 minutes ago, polisciundergrad10 said:

I haven't actually done my LSAT yet so I can't give you an extremely knowledgeable response, however I studied the powerscore bibles a few months ago and was finding the books don't explain things that well, at least in my personal opinion. I recently enrolled in 7sage and realized how much better it is that the PS bibles, its so clear and well explained and the material is all organized in such a practical and efficient way. Definitely recommend 7Sage over Powerscore but that being said, it all matters on you personally and what works for you!

Thanks and good luck!

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I think it really depends on how you learn best, and on how much money you're willing to spend on LSAT prep. I self-studied with the PowerScore Bibles (I didn't use any of their online resources or videos or anything) and I did fine. I didn't look into 7Sage at all so I can't comment on how useful one is over the other. I think some people get all stressed about what other people are doing rather than focusing on what works best for them (that isn't to say that you are one of those people, it's just a general observation). I'm pretty motivated and I was fairly confident I could figure it out myself, and if I really needed help with something, I could hire a tutor for an hour or two. I spent a couple of hundred dollars on the bibles and a few books of old LSATs, and I didn't end up needing a tutor. I would be willing to bet that a LOT of students could get away with that approach, but are too stressed about how everyone else is preparing that they end up dropping over $1000 on a course that they maybe didn't even need. 

Anyway, all of this depends on your natural abilities and how you learn and how you prefer to study, so really it's up to you. Hopefully my 2 cents is at least a little helpful. Good luck!

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16 minutes ago, Rubisco said:

I think it really depends on how you learn best, and on how much money you're willing to spend on LSAT prep. I self-studied with the PowerScore Bibles (I didn't use any of their online resources or videos or anything) and I did fine. I didn't look into 7Sage at all so I can't comment on how useful one is over the other. I think some people get all stressed about what other people are doing rather than focusing on what works best for them (that isn't to say that you are one of those people, it's just a general observation). I'm pretty motivated and I was fairly confident I could figure it out myself, and if I really needed help with something, I could hire a tutor for an hour or two. I spent a couple of hundred dollars on the bibles and a few books of old LSATs, and I didn't end up needing a tutor. I would be willing to bet that a LOT of students could get away with that approach, but are too stressed about how everyone else is preparing that they end up dropping over $1000 on a course that they maybe didn't even need. 

Anyway, all of this depends on your natural abilities and how you learn and how you prefer to study, so really it's up to you. Hopefully my 2 cents is at least a little helpful. Good luck!

Thanks for the feedback!

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