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JamesCL

Paralegal path

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New here, hope everyone is well.

Been contemplating a new career path, and just looking for some experienced opinions.

1. Seneca vs private school like herzing?

2. Does one acquire enough practical knowledge to open up their own paralegal business shortly after obtaining a license?

3. Is there a high demand for paralegals, pending you have a good marketing, should it be fairly good business venture?

4.  What are good niche's to get into, traffic, etc?  Or is it good to focus on a few different niches to practice?

Excuse my ignorance, but law sector is totally foreign to me and I'd like to get as much insider info as possible.

Thanks in advance,

James

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I have practically no paralegal experience, but i will try my best to tackle a few of these

1. Seneca vs private school like herzing? I am in the US so i dont know

2. Does one acquire enough practical knowledge to open up their own paralegal business shortly after obtaining a license?  This is a tough question because no one wants to hire someone who is going to be a competitor later on, so many aspiring entrepreneurs have no choice but to start a practice from the start. 

3. Is there a high demand for paralegals, pending you have a good marketing, should it be fairly good business venture?  Again, im in the US, but in the US the legal market is finally predicted to grow at a fair rate.

4.  What are good niche's to get into, traffic, etc?  Or is it good to focus on a few different niches to practice?  You should start with the niche that you are most comfortable with, so long as it is related to your long term goals.  You can always branch out later once you are sure you can handle the workload.  This is my 2 cents from my time studying in my mba program

 

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Great reply, thanks for your time.

What kind of work do you do in the states? 

On 08/07/2018 at 3:34 PM, accjohn1990 said:

 

 

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I work as a tutor and a paralegal assistant.  As a tutor I help community members with basic education as they try to gain their high school equivalency.  My time as a paralegal assistant is spent drafting documents such as chapter agreements and cash on hand policies  

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On 6/21/2018 at 9:27 PM, JamesCL said:

New here, hope everyone is well.

Been contemplating a new career path, and just looking for some experienced opinions.

1. Seneca vs private school like herzing?

2. Does one acquire enough practical knowledge to open up their own paralegal business shortly after obtaining a license?

3. Is there a high demand for paralegals, pending you have a good marketing, should it be fairly good business venture?

4.  What are good niche's to get into, traffic, etc?  Or is it good to focus on a few different niches to practice?

Excuse my ignorance, but law sector is totally foreign to me and I'd like to get as much insider info as possible.

Thanks in advance,

James

 

I am a licenced paralegal. Here are the answers to your questions

  1. 1. The education is similar, all programs must be accredited by the Law Society, so go wherever the tuition is cheapest. 
  2. Just from taking the paralegal course, no. If you have previous business experience it helps. It is better to work and get some experience first before starting your own practice. 
  3. The problem is that there is an over supply. The market is saturated. Too many paralegals chasing too few clients. That being said, there are some very successful paralegals out there. The key is finding a niche and specializing in that niche. NB: LSO only allows lawyers who have met the requirements to call themselves specialists. 
  4. The big 3 that a lot of people seem to get into are POA (traffic ect), LTB and Small Claims. The competition in these areas is fierce, especially POA. Your best bet is to find one of the numerous tribunals that paralegals can represent at and develop a business in that area. Just be warned that developing a practice is a slow and arduous process. 

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