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Noway

Foreign grads: an outside perspective

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Posted (edited)
On 6/7/2018 at 9:12 AM, Noway said:

To my public:

I apologise for taking so long to respond to the screed below. I was busy working as a lawyer in a small firm in a low-status practice area. There were also some individuals of little economic means in the vicinity but they self-deported soon enough.


I am neither a law graduate nor a law hopeful. I am a member of the general population who came here seeking info on this phenomenon of overseas legal education. This may be true, but you sure seem to know a lot (two words) about the legal market in Canada for somebody without a vested interest.


I have to say that I find it disheartening that the discussions that I have seen here seem to centre around whether foreign grads will ever actually enter the profession and, if so, how prestigious their jobs will be. How dare they. The very nerve. They should clean our toilets and shut up. I would like to remind overseas potentials Oh, look. You coined a new term. Others here have used "losers" and "dropouts". Thanks for livening this up. that there are other elements that are more important, particularly professional responsibility. 

I have seen many of the comments, looked at the school's sites You forgot the Oxford comma in this list. and reviewed some stats Shorthand. So legit. and know people who went both routes, and no matter what people argue, Run-on sentence. these overseas schools have tremendously low Compared to what? admission standards and low competition within their schools. (Admission based solely on grades as low as B-), Are you starting a sentence with a parenthetical phrase? which seems to create a lot of variability in terms of the quality of their admitted students and their graduates. I think the word you are looking for is "scum".

Remember that while British, Aus and US all have education systems on par with, or better than, Canada's, that doesn't apply to these schools Could you be more specific? Or would you just rather cast aspersions?, most of which have poor reputations even in their own countries. Remember that students going to school abroad are checking out of the stream part way "part-way" (ex: "e.g." in the UK a law degree doesn't qualify one to be a lawyer, Run-on sentence. grads have to have a 2:1 to do postgrad barrister/solicitor training programs + two year training contract; Canadian students w/ a lower 2:2 can come back to Canada, write the bar up to 8 times and article for one year in a dodgy firm run by their uncle Or at the top dispute resolution firm in the province like I did. ; the US is known to have degree mills which is why the bar is notoriously hard to filter them Poor grammar; usage of "Them" -- inflammatory. the same is not true in Canada). I personally think Redundant. that students w/ foreign degrees shouldn't be considered by the NCA until they have fully qualified as a lawyer in the jurisdiction in which they studied And just how the the flip is that supposed to happen for a Canadian with a student visa that expires soon after they graduate from the university? and possibly spent a few years working w/ references required. And maybe a Rolex and a private jet. This keeps the door open to legit I knew you wouldn't let me down, MC Hammer. foreign lawyers while closing the doors on law school tourists. So they can drown in the Mediterranean? Or maybe a wall. And they can pay for it.

The evidence Do tell. shows that many of these people are indeed passing the bar and practicing as lawyers in Canada, just in small firm Shocking! and low status practice areas. I'm starting to think you might actually be a law grad -- U of T, right? This reality Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy? Caught in a landslide, no escape from reality. is troubling, Do you need your blankie? as they are more likely to have a clientele that is already vulnerable and low income (family law, immigration law) and a bad lawyer can be harmful to their access to justice. I think you are confusing parochial Canadian thinking with consumer protection.

As professionals, these graduates will have serious fiduciary responsibilities Redundant. to vulnerable I do not think that word means what you think it means. clients. Students taking advantage of the minimal admission standards abroad should ask themselves honestly if they are able and willing to meet the professional and ethical standards that are required for competent practice. If not, the most professional decision one can make is to opt out of law before they harm people's cases or get sued. Just admit you are a bad person from bad parents and move on. Mow my lawn or make my coffee.

They need to ask themselves why they did badly as undergrads Because what you did when you were 19 is indicative of your future self forever and ever and ever and ever. and whether they are likely to suddenly have the high levels of engagement, self-motivation That missing comma again. and leadership ability required for professional competence. Are they actually able to handle mooting, working in the legal clinic or research alongside law school (because only the recklessly ill-prepared could think that legal skills are learned in the classroom), or the ongoing professional training, reading and overtime that is required in practice? Is this a vocation for them or a 9-5 status symbol? 

There are some overseas hopefuls/graduates posting here who do not demonstrate a grasp of basic grammar and argumentation, Comma splice. which speaks volumes about the clarity, precision and rigour of their future work - and no, it does not matter that they are writing on the internet. Juudgy.

As a potential consumer You aren't a consumer yet? Were you born in an ashram?, I question whether a person like that "A person like that" -- inflammatory. would require more billable hours in order to produce competent work (if at all) Poor grammar. when they can't spit out something sensible under pressure and without editing. I question the professionalism, commitment and judgment of someone who doesn't recognize that their presentation Consistency --  first you're talking about actual ability, now you're talking about "presentation". affects their credibility and that of the profession, right or wrong. I'm reconsidering: maybe you're not a lawyer -- you're just obsessed with lawyers and "the profession". It's okay. That's cool. Just put down the gun and step away from the girl.

People like me are becoming more aware of this backdoor Kinky. process Is this a threat? and I suspect that you will start seeing negative responses from your potential clients. If I had a choice, I wouldn't hire  some of the people who post here who are made woefully unimpressive by either their presentation or the motivations that they tacitly express. I don't want to work for "people like you".

It is honestly depressing how singularly focused "singularly-focussed" some people here are on money and jobs, Those consumers -- can't live with 'em, can't kill 'em. without consideration to what you can bring to the profession and whether you can handle the significant responsibilities therein. Therein! A non-lawyer using "therein"! Heretofore, I had never seen the aforementioned usage of same by a member of the "general public". I'll catch you on the "dodgy DTES" -- by the way, just how many law firms are on the DTES? I know there are or used to be some opposite the court house on Main Street, there is a criminal firm around the corner on Alexander, and I guess there must be some in Chinatown, but I can't think of many. I suppose keeping your classist tone is essential in a classist rant, though.

 

Edited by kcraigsejong
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Posted (edited)
On 6/8/2018 at 11:18 PM, Noway said:

Don't be so sure about that. - FLSc commissioned a review of the NCA process in 2017 and one of the recommendations was for their evaluation to take a professional competency-based (skill and knowledge) approach rather than the largely knowledge-based approach in place now. Indeed, other countries do this already, with the UK using OSCEs (borrowed from medical professions) to evaluate basic skills like client interviewing. 

It would have to be on a jurisdiction-by-jurisdiction basis, but wouldn't full qualification prior to application be a step in ensuring that those foundational skills are being learned on par with Canadian grads, without placing an enormous financial burden on the NCA (and our taxes) to meet the 1400 candidates individually to evaluate skills? Plus practice experience means that they get to skip articling, removing the barrier that NCAers allege is due to discrimination against their degree. Seems to be in everyone's interest as long as they are competitive in their host jurisdiction. People are averse to this just because they know visa issues make it more difficult. Again: what in blue bloody blazes are you talking about? "Visa issues" don't make it more difficult, they make it impossible for someone who doesn't have permanent right to remain in that country, an ancestry visa, and/or marry the first local they see when they get off the plane. You are overlooking "reality". Do you think you can stone me and spit in my eye?

 

Edited by kcraigsejong
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The OP has said s/he is “done now”. I agree.

Y’all have more patience than I do. 

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