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Gerwulf

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4 hours ago, analyst said:

I have a GPA and am trying to calculate Percentage using this link . My school has A B C D. What would that be in percentage ?

Is A a 100, B a 74, C a 55 and D a 50 looks horribly wrong to me ? WIth this scale I am getting a percentage of 40%... no way. My real GPA is actually pretty decent.

Not international school but my undergrad was from a USA school. In my school A is 4.0 , B is a 3, C is a 2 and D is a 1. What percentage will be assigned to an A grade ?

Admissions office has a scale but they wont reveal it and cannot trust this scale because it says it is not for law schools ?

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3 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

seems out of the ordinary

@pzabbythesecond Why ? Most places for GPA A is 4.0 , B is a 3, C is a 2 and D is a 1.

Admissions office particularly said WES is for schools not in North America (USA is in North America:o).

I just need to know the percentages McGill assigns for grades A through D. 

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3 minutes ago, analyst said:

@pzabbythesecond Why ? Most places for GPA A is 4.0 , B is a 3, C is a 2 and D is a 1.

Admissions office particularly said WES is for schools not in North America (USA is in North America:o).

I just need to know the percentages McGill assigns for grades A through D. 

Like I said, I don't know. Since there are no plus or minus grades, it's still a bit of a strange scheme, which is why I said WES may still help. I'm aware it's for non NA schools generally, but what can't hurt, may as well be tried right?

 

I'm surprised you ended up with a percentage of 40 on that McGill conversion scale using your school's GPA system though. That seems rather unlikely.

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@pzabbythesecond a lot of schools do not have +/- (plusses and minuses)

I could find a WES scale because it does not have one for USA. It converts other countries to North America and not the other way round. Care posting a link ?

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5 hours ago, Gerwulf said:

Hi @jan, and sorry for the delay.

Although I understand your points 100% (I was in your shoes too at one point!), I have to agree with @pzabbythesecond's intervention. Law is a very stressful domain from A(dmission) to Z, and the #1 best advice I can give to anyone starting in the legal field is to start learning now how to cope with stress, no matter its intensity or its source. Being able to neutralize stress is not only a good law student quality, it's a good human quality.

To pick on your point, I too have worked really hard during my college & first undergrad so I could get into law school. I had no social life and was working really intensely from 6-7 am to 10-11 pm every single day for years so I could secure a GPA that would in turn get a seat into a top law school (I was initially aiming for Harvard or Yale, but eventually decided on McGill for obvious financial reasons). My point is I also experienced the fear of not seeing all the sacrifices I made since I first started my higher education. I know what it is. I know how you are feeling and I know it is horrible. However, just as @pzabbythesecond stated, getting in is only the begging of the game.

We know all of you guys have worked incredibly hard to be where you are today. Simply facing the possibility of being admitted means you sacrificed and worked a lot. However, once you will actually be in law school, you'll still have to work and sacrifice a lot more. At one point you'll dream of working for X or Y firm or employer, and there's a big chance someone else gets your dream job. It's sad, but that's unfortunately how it is. If you do lose your seat, you have to keep your chin up and immediately start fighting for another instead of letting the bad news destroy you.

The competition is very intense in the law domain, and you're competing with highly competent players. I basically was at the top of my program during my first degree, and was literally embarrassed when I first started law school because I felt everybody else was so much smarter than me. I felt incredibly average and it hurt my ego really bad. However, that's just how it is. Everybody is crazy smart. 

Keep in mind that you are in that pool of incredibly smart applicants and are competing against them for a seat. That mere fact means you are also incredibly smart. I know waiting on an admission is extremely stressful, but we can't control that waiting period or the admission committee whatsoever. The only thing we can try and control is our mental reactions to the situation we are facing, and this very fact is the reason for my previous comment. While waiting, our stress is the only thing we can control. It is our choice whether we decide to control it or let it control us. In my book, no stress, no matter its source, should take over your mental state and overall well being. We're human beings before being law school applicants or students. Let's not forget it. 

In any case, I am really happy to know you have secured a seat :) Congratulations on your admission :) Just to double check, were you admitted to McGill, or to another university? If you have any question whatsoever regarding law school, please feel free to ask here, or send me a private message. It will be a great pleasure to help you as best as I can. 

I hope you have a nice day and sorry once again for the delay in responding. All the best :) 

First and foremost, no problem regarding the delay. This is a forum, after all, and a relatively niche one at that. I think you replied in a very timely manner, considering that context. 

Re: Stress

I don't disagree with a word of this. I think we're on the same page, and that you're really offering up some kind words and good advice here. Stress management is undoubtedly a critical skill, especially in a rigorous discipline or profession.

The intended thesis of my original comment was that the stress associated with waiting on an admission decision that could go either way, especially this late in the game, is unique and novel for a lot of prospective students. This unprecedented anxiety is something that many people can only learn to deal with retrospectively. Recognizing that something that you think is the end of the world isn't actually the end of the world in the moment is a feat that would require an extraordinary amount of self awareness. Most people don't discover that life is unpredictable and success is non-linear until their strict life itinerary doesn't go according to plan, and they only recognize in the aftermath that they emerged completely unscathed and can still continue on to their desired destination. 

Fortunately or unfortunately, as you suggest, similar uncertain, transitory circumstances will undoubtedly arise in the future, regardless of whether an applicant goes to law school or not. Rejection and failure are always possible, and panic is pretty much an unavoidable response to facing those possibilities. Sometimes the stress is impossible to neutralize. Hopefully, meditation upon this experience and the advice that kind strangers offered throughout it will allow applicants facing similar scenarios in the future to better control and reflect upon their panic in a productive way. But being unable to do that at this moment, especially if they've never faced rejection at such a (seemingly) significant scale before, is an unfortunate part of the stress management learning curve, in my opinion. 

Re: school acceptances

I was lucky enough to score some acceptances from a few schools. McGill was the first offer that I received, and I ultimately decided to accept it.

Thanks for offering your guidance. I sincerely appreciate your support. I imagine we'll eventually cross paths, although I'll probably be too embarrassed to out myself as the person who rambled a couple thousand words of nonsense about stress to you. 

Edited by jan
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On ‎6‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 5:33 PM, jan said:

This really puts it all in perspective. It's kind of scary that the acceptance rate is less than 10%. Other law schools are probably hitting a similar ratio, too. It also seems to get more and more competitive each year. 

The acceptance rate is not less than 10%. Many more than 180 offers will be made in order to yield 180 students enrolling. Not everyone who receives a McGill acceptance will attend.

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I have heard that they will give an answer (accepted, refused, wait listed) to all the participants before july is it true ?

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On ‎2018‎-‎06‎-‎08 at 8:13 PM, analyst said:

@Minna any idea of what are the percentages for A, B, C, D . Please look at my post above.

Hi! Unfortunately, I don't have any useful knowledge about international grade conversions. I went to a University in Ontario so I had no need. Sorry I couldn't be of more help!

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On 6/6/2018 at 9:01 PM, Lampadaire said:

I'm a cegep applicant, my request is still on ready for review state. I haven't been call for any interview. 

At this point I'm starting to think that they forget to give me a proper answer (accepted, refused, waitlisted)

 

Last year I was a university applicant and they also made me wait until mid-June. I am pretty sure they were waiting to see my final transcript before making a decision. I ended up sending the transcript to them on 30 May, and they made me an offer on 12 June. Maybe it's the same for you? Check when they have/will have received your final cegep transcript, and factor in two additional weeks for an answer. Your mileage may vary.

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