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Lawstudent212

Articling Advice

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Hello

I was hoping to gain insight into my situation

I am a summer student at a mid size firm in Toronto, I am participating in the articling recruit process at the end of this month

My desire is to work in big law in downtown, i realize this is a competitive process but Its my goal

1) I dont know how to ask my current summer firm for a letter of recommendation because I dont want to alienate them and give the appearance that I am not interested, which is not the truth I love the people in the firm and although I want to shoot for big law in downtown I would be very appreciative and happy with an offer for articling from this firm, but it also slightly concerns me that they have yet to offer me anything 

2) any general advise on articling and how I might work way to bay st?

Thanks in advance

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I told my 2L firm I didn't wasn't going to article there when they asked. I had another job lined up.

It's early in your 2L summer and you shouldn't expect an articling offer yet, or even the "so what are your plans" conversation. You should think carefully before leaving because the plan you've outlined is naive. You can't credibly maintain that you'd be happy to article for your current firm but also want to actively try not to article for them. Your current firm will start looking for a replacement if you tell them you're looking for a new job. Do you think they want to be a fallback in a buyer's market? If you leave outright--and preferably for a non-competitor--they'll be professional and probably write a reference, but don't expect them to be interested in helping you hedge your bets.

The risk isn't staying where you are, it's getting nothing. If you want my general advice, the shot at a handful of Bay spots isn't worth it. Stick with this firm and work with people you like. Ask to try working for the solicitors in your office. See where articles take you.

 

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13 hours ago, Horace said:

I told my 2L firm I didn't wasn't going to article there when they asked. I had another job lined up.

It's early in your 2L summer and you shouldn't expect an articling offer yet, or even the "so what are your plans" conversation. You should think carefully before leaving because the plan you've outlined is naive. You can't credibly maintain that you'd be happy to article for your current firm but also want to actively try not to article for them. Your current firm will start looking for a replacement if you tell them you're looking for a new job. Do you think they want to be a fallback in a buyer's market? If you leave outright--and preferably for a non-competitor--they'll be professional and probably write a reference, but don't expect them to be interested in helping you hedge your bets.

The risk isn't staying where you are, it's getting nothing. If you want my general advice, the shot at a handful of Bay spots isn't worth it. Stick with this firm and work with people you like. Ask to try working for the solicitors in your office. See where articles take you.

 

I don't agree with all of the comments in the above post - my experience was completely different. I had an excellent time with my 2L summer employer and likely would have loved articling there, but staying there would have pigeonholed me in a more specific area of law and I just wasn't 100% sure I wanted to commit to that at that point. I had a great relationship with the people I worked with and was upfront with the lawyers there and sought advice from them. They were supportive of my looking for a broader experience (though I didn't ask them for references - I used law school professors and prior employers). That said, I liked them and they liked me - days before articling applications were due, I was told they would be offering me an articling position but understood I intended to go through the recruit, and that I would receive a call from them on call day. I ultimately received and accepted an offer elsewhere, and am still on great terms with the lawyers I worked with.

Not every employer will have the same approach, and I recognize that I may have had a particularly positive experience doing this. But, I just wanted to provide an alternate experience to what's described by the above poster. Sure, employers don't want to be fallbacks, but they also want the opportunity to hold onto someone they like. Only you know the vibe of your current workplace and what might be appropriate.

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