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dothebird

Licensing Exam Questions

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Started studying for the exams beginning of May.   I predict that I should have read through all the materials (except for real estate) by the end of next week.  I have some questions re: strategy from here on out.   

I should preface this with some information re: my learning style as I think people will be able to offer better advice.  I am not particularly adept to learning through reading materials (facepalm), though i have been reading the materials closely and with a purpose, i feel as though i haven't retained anything other than general principles i have learned in law school respecting the particular subject matter.  Instead, I am most conducive to learning through application.  For example, in law school, my approach typically followed: 1) take great class notes; 2) take time to condense those class notes into short summaries; and 3) by the end of classes, bust out practice exam after practice exam.  This proved to be a useful strategy for me in law school, as i did pretty well overall. But studying for the licensing exams has me a bit worried given that the suggested study method does not align with my strengths when it comes to learning. 

Keeping the above in mind, here are my questions:

1) should i read through the materials a second time? 

Note that i have not found reading through the material thus far to be particularly useful as it relates to actually memorizing it.  I understand i need to become familiar with where everything is.  I am inclined to not actually read through the materials word for word again, but rather, go through each section and basically flip through the pages to understand how everything is organized. in other words, look at the headings, subheadings etc. and just ask myself "what material is covered here".  I supsect this would be a more useful expenditure of my time. curious to hear what other people think about this approach. 

2) i have done some practice questions after i have finished certain sections just because am eager and i always want to try and apply what ive just learned, cause we all know you never actually know anything until you are able to apply it. doing these practice questions has lead to a bit of worry. I didnt do very well overall, not to mention that i was no where near within the appropriate time range (recall that - and i dont say this to brag, rather to provide context for advice- i was a well above average student in law school).  as such, how should i treat these results?  

3) I go to an ontario law school and i am fortunate enough to have an abundance of materials from upper years (questions, indices, quicksheets, charts etc.). with so much material at my fingertips however, i am concerned with what i actually need for the exam. i would prefer to confine my resources to the DTOC, index and bar materials, but would thaat be silly?  I dont want to have too many resources at the exam because it will only lead to an irrational anxiety where i will waste time thinking about all the materials i have and which one to look through instead of following a strict pattern for each question. 

 

So in short:

1) what should i do after reading materials once keeping in mind my learning style;

2) how should i treat practice tests that i do, is therre anything that will indicate to me that i am ready for the exam?

3) what kind of resources should i bring to the exam.  

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The bar exam materials are not very accessible, regardless of whether or not you prefer learning through reading. I hope that alleviates some of your worries. The fact that you feel like you haven't retained anything other than general principles is normal. All my friends felt the same way. The key to this exam is knowing where to find the answers in the materials, which means having a good index, which ultimately means you need to be very familiar with your index and how it works. If you prefer not to use an index, you must come up with some method for quickly and efficiently finding the answers to the questions in the materials. To answer your questions:

1) No, you do not need to read the materials a second time. I'm not saying you shouldn't read the materials. I know some people who did and some people who didn't. Both passed.

2) To squish your two questions into one answer, the fact that you cannot answer the questions within the allotted time means it's absolutely crucial that you focus on developing a strategy for finding the answers quickly in the materials. Time is a key factor in the bar exam. When I studied for the bar exam, I had around five or six practice exams. I went through two practice exams untimed. I wanted to use that opportunity to familiarize myself with my index. Then I timed the other exams.

3) It depends on what works best for your brain. I only used the index, bar materials, and my own table of contents that I created. Other people brought in charts with them because they found it helped them find the answers faster.

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On 2018-05-20 at 10:51 PM, Turkeytime said:

The bar exam materials are not very accessible, regardless of whether or not you prefer learning through reading. I hope that alleviates some of your worries. The fact that you feel like you haven't retained anything other than general principles is normal. All my friends felt the same way. The key to this exam is knowing where to find the answers in the materials, which means having a good index, which ultimately means you need to be very familiar with your index and how it works. If you prefer not to use an index, you must come up with some method for quickly and efficiently finding the answers to the questions in the materials. To answer your questions:

1) No, you do not need to read the materials a second time. I'm not saying you shouldn't read the materials. I know some people who did and some people who didn't. Both passed.

2) To squish your two questions into one answer, the fact that you cannot answer the questions within the allotted time means it's absolutely crucial that you focus on developing a strategy for finding the answers quickly in the materials. Time is a key factor in the bar exam. When I studied for the bar exam, I had around five or six practice exams. I went through two practice exams untimed. I wanted to use that opportunity to familiarize myself with my index. Then I timed the other exams.

3) It depends on what works best for your brain. I only used the index, bar materials, and my own table of contents that I created. Other people brought in charts with them because they found it helped them find the answers faster.

Where did you find five or six practice exams? Ontario Law Exam only offers one practice for each exam.

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On 5/23/2018 at 10:17 PM, jmac123 said:

Where did you find five or six practice exams? Ontario Law Exam only offers one practice for each exam.

http://www.ontariolawexam.com/

https://www.emondexamprep.ca/

https://barpreppal.ca/

https://barexamcrackers.com/

http://lawexams.ca/

 

The only thing that matters is doing the practice exams. You can pass without reading the materials. Feel free to disagree.

Edited by chirico
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Everyone is different, but I spent the last few days closely studying the table of contents and the headings/subheadings. I found that more helpful than anything else and it was the resource that I used the most. I hardly even looked at my index during the exam as I found it much too cumbersome. You want to be able to skim a question and realize exactly what section it will be in, then immediately locate that binder and answer the question. 

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I didn't use an index at all - I read all the materials, did some practice exams, and used just the table of contents provided. I found it more than sufficient and I finished both exams with plenty of time to spare. A major key is to simply not get stressed out or anxious - that just takes up a lot of your time.

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