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Judgeship - if you aren't a litigator, is it still possible?

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4 minutes ago, TrqTTs said:

They don't prep for cases like you or the Crown do though, they literally show up on a case by case basis to see what they're dealing with at hand.  Maybe it depends on the court (all provincial courts here) and the judge I am most familiar with is nearing retirement, but this individual definitely enjoys the quantity and quality of vacation days and it does not seem to be anything new.

Well especially in superior or appellate courts, they do have to read motion materials, casebooks, Charter arguments etc before court, which can be a lot of material.There is less of that in provincial court for sure. They also have to research and write judgments after. 

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Posted (edited)

What was that quote in Letters to a Young Lawyer by Alan Dershowitz?  Something along the lines of a defense attorney calls their client excitedly and tells them "Justice has prevailed! "  The client responds, "Appeal, immediately!"

Edited by TrqTTs
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They also have to research and write judgments after.



Or look over what their clerks have done. ;) I thought you did a clerkship, you should know that!

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Posted (edited)

I know that as a defence lawyer I have definitely been filing more stuff and been asked to file more stuff over the past couple of  years and add to that the pressure and timelines of Jordan and I think all of us in the criminal justice system, judges included, are working harder, have more paperwork, and are more stressed.

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1 minute ago, erinl2 said:



Or look over what their clerks have done. ;) I thought you did a clerkship, you should know that!

Well that’s included in “writing” a judgment of course!:)

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On 5/16/2018 at 8:09 AM, TrqTTs said:

This particular judge had quite a bit of soliciting experience themselves in private practice prior to joining the crown's office, and subsequently getting called to the bench.  So though soliciting experience is not a detriment of course, some litigation experience (on either or preferably both sides of criminal) along with continuing legal education and community involvement seem more or less crucial to making it.

 

Teehee.

Bedford has changed my interpretation of this word forever.

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The only lawyers I know who have soliciting experience are litigators fwiw

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