Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
ZAC028

Graduation date on LSAT application

Recommended Posts

I am writing my lsat in September 2018 but I am graduating in winter 2020. What month do I write for graduation, would I write April, may or June. The ceremony is held in June but my exams end in April. Also I think I will fast track and end in December but I would still need to attend the June ceremony. Can anyone help me and tell me what month and year to write. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe your scores are valid for 5 years.  I have to double check that...so u can write now if you wanted to...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, ZAC028 said:

I am writing my lsat in September 2018 but I am graduating in winter 2020. What month do I write for graduation, would I write April, may or June. The ceremony is held in June but my exams end in April. Also I think I will fast track and end in December but I would still need to attend the June ceremony. Can anyone help me and tell me what month and year to 

 

Just now, ZAC028 said:

Thank you, also what month should I say I graduate, is it June 2020?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah. That's what I put I believe. April or June ..that part isn't going to matter too much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, ZAC028 said:

I am writing my lsat in September 2018 but I am graduating in winter 2020. What month do I write for graduation, would I write April, may or June. The ceremony is held in June but my exams end in April. Also I think I will fast track and end in December but I would still need to attend the June ceremony. Can anyone help me and tell me what month and year to write. 

Why are you writing it so early? I would write it closer to or even after you graduate - no rush. Having a bit more education and life experience will likely help with the test. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, OldOne said:

Yeah. That's what I put I believe. April or June ..that part isn't going to matter too much.

Thanks, is it also possible for me to add additional GPA information after submitting may application

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, providence said:

Why are you writing it so early? I would write it closer to or even after you graduate - no rush. Having a bit more education and life experience will likely help with the test. 

Testing the waters, I want to try it out to see if it is something that I am capable of doing before committing to law school. I would have the option to apply to more master degree programs and post-grad programs earlier if I find out law school isn't for me sooner. Get what I am saying? I don't know if it the right decision though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, ZAC028 said:

Testing the waters, I want to try it out to see if it is something that I am capable of doing before committing to law school. I would have the option to apply to more master degree programs and post-grad programs earlier if I find out law school isn't for me sooner. Get what I am saying? I don't know if it the right decision though. 

I don't think it makes sense to pay for a formal test to do that. Just get a practice test, do it honestly under test conditions and timing, and score it yourself.

You're not "seeing it's something you're capable of doing before committing to law school." You can't commit to law school unless you get an LSAT score sufficient to get in. You're trying to see if you can get an LSAT good enough to get in. Part of the ability to do well on the LSAT comes from the skills you develop during your undergraduate experience. If you only have a year or two of that under your belt, you may or may not be ready. If you want to see how close you are, just do a practice test. 

Also, getting a good LSAT score doesn't mean that "law school is for you." It just means that you have the reasoning skills to get a good LSAT score which suggests you have part of the pre-requisites for law school and are demonstrating that you may have the skills to succeed academically in law school. Great, but do you want to be a lawyer? Do you have a realistic sense of what you would do as a lawyer?  I think these are more important questions to answer in the early days of undergrad rather than spending money to write the LSAT. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To add, GPA is also as important as LSAT and it is so early you don't know what that is going to be. If you maintain good grades now, you are leaving the door to law school open and are ahead of all the people screwing around who will start panicking about their bad grades in their last year and "aiming for 170" on the LSAT and having to write it multiple times. If you have a strong GPA, you won't need an elite LSAT score to get accepted to law schools. The LSAT should be the last piece of the puzzle when everything else is already coming together. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, providence said:

Why are you writing it so early? I would write it closer to or even after you graduate - no rush. Having a bit more education and life experience will likely help with the test. 

I know lots of people who wrote the LSAT in September of third year. There's nothing wrong with doing so as long as you are properly prepared.  In my opinion, too many students wait until the last minute and then have no score prior to applying. Having a valid score can be useful to assess where they may be a competitive candidate and what schools may just be a waste of time and money.

I think a timed diagnostic practice test can be used to 'test the waters' but that's a separate issue. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, erinl2 said:

I know lots of people who wrote the LSAT in September of third year. There's nothing wrong with doing so as long as you are properly prepared.  In my opinion, too many students wait until the last minute and then have no score prior to applying. Having a valid score can be useful to assess where they may be a competitive candidate and what schools may just be a waste of time and money.

I think a timed diagnostic practice test can be used to 'test the waters' but that's a separate issue. 

Agreed. I wrote in September of 3rd year, didn't do as well as I needed to, and rewrote in June right after 3rd year ended. That way when 4th year came, I was able to apply ASAP with my June LSAT score. I can't imagine juggling school, applications, and the LSAT in Sept or Dec of 4th year. Not to mention if you bomb Sept or Dec of 4th year, you're gonna have to wait for the next admissions cycle. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, erinl2 said:

I know lots of people who wrote the LSAT in September of third year. There's nothing wrong with doing so as long as you are properly prepared.  In my opinion, too many students wait until the last minute and then have no score prior to applying. Having a valid score can be useful to assess where they may be a competitive candidate and what schools may just be a waste of time and money.

I think a timed diagnostic practice test can be used to 'test the waters' but that's a separate issue. 

 

6 minutes ago, Inconspicuous said:

Agreed. I wrote in September of 3rd year, didn't do as well as I needed to, and rewrote in June right after 3rd year ended. That way when 4th year came, I was able to apply ASAP with my June LSAT score. I can't imagine juggling school, applications, and the LSAT in Sept or Dec of 4th year. Not to mention if you bomb Sept or Dec of 4th year, you're gonna have to wait for the next admissions cycle. 

Oh, OK. I see that this is fall of 3rd year for the OP. For some reason, it seemed like it was only their 2nd year. Maybe "winter 2020" threw me off. I guess that's not as crazy as it sounded to me initially. :) Now I think of it, I wrote the MCAT in third year when I was planning on med school, now I think of it, and that was recommended because most of the material on it had been more recently covered in class. It does seem that it would be more practicable to apply for law schools knowing your score. I stand corrected. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...