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Sio

Will I ever go to law school ? (2.12)

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On 4/22/2018 at 9:29 AM, Sio said:

Hi everyone, I have a bit of a situation and I’m hoping you guys can help me out. I apologize in advance for the long story!

I applied to law school for September admissions and so far have been rejected from everywhere except Ottawa but I’m not holding my breath at all for that. I want to apply for the next cycle but I want to do that with confidence.

Due to medical reasons the first two years of my undergrad were real crappy and my overall GPA is extremely low 2.12. I know. It’s awful. I got an LSAT of 152 but am planning to rewrite in September and I want to shoot for the 170s to sort of compensate for my shitty GPA. I was practice testing in the 160s when I was studying and test day was just a bunch of nerves and I ended up with 152 but anyways I know I can achieve a way higher LSAT if I put a lot of work and effort in. 

 

Even if I manage to achieve a high LSAT score my GPA is way too low and my question is, what can I do to raise my GPA? I’ve looked into pursuing a masters but of course don’t meet the admission requirements. I also looked into going back to university to complete an extra year but all the deadlines have long passed and I would have to apply in 2019 and that will push my law school applications for entry in 2020. 

I would really like to spend this year doing things to improve my application and increase my competitiveness. I’ve asked some of the law school admissions on what I can do to improve my app and they said I had great volunteering/LORs and PS but the stats don’t prove my ability to handle law school. So they said if I could take some extra courses and raise my GPA I could have a shot for next year. 

So, do you guys have any advice for me? Is there anything I can do degree-wise that would raise my GPA or overall just improve my application? Or do you think that I can’t overcome my GPA and I should just consider another path all together? 

Any help you guys can provide would be much appreciated! Thank you! 

and please, no negative comments! 

I had a 2.84 gpa, I returned to university and took a full course load + an extra 0.5 credit. When I applied with a 2.84 I got rejected from every school I applied to. But now after maintaining a 3.9 for this year. I got into Calgary Law and have yet to receive any rejections because they are waiting for my current second semester grades. So just because you take an extra year and start in 2018 September, you can still apply and wait and see if you will get in after your grades are submitted by professors in May. There may be a smaller chance of acceptance because of rolling admissions but that doesn't mean that you have to waste a year. I didn't get in and decided to go back to university for a year. Not ideal. But you have to do what it takes, because there are people on these forums who did not mess up their first years of schools and that's the nature of life. it is competitive. I would say your only option is to go back and improve on your GPA if that option is available to you. 

Edited by aaronl
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On April 23, 2018 at 12:39 PM, aaronl said:

I had a 2.84 gpa, I returned to university and took a full course load + an extra 0.5 credit. When I applied with a 2.84 I got rejected from every school I applied to. But now after maintaining a 3.9 for this year. I got into Calgary Law and have yet to receive any rejections because they are waiting for my current second semester grades. So just because you take an extra year and start in 2018 September, you can still apply and wait and see if you will get in after your grades are submitted by professors in May. There may be a smaller chance of acceptance because of rolling admissions but that doesn't mean that you have to waste a year. I didn't get in and decided to go back to university for a year. Not ideal. But you have to do what it takes, because there are people on these forums who did not mess up their first years of schools and that's the nature of life. it is competitive. I would say your only option is to go back and improve on your GPA if that option is available to you. 

2.84 is 0.72 higher than 2.12. That is a huge difference in GPA.

There are too many if(s) that make it hard to make any prediction. 

I was hoping to get 180 when I wrote the third time and didn't get anything near that.

With a 2.12, I doubt even 170 would help. 

There are a few thousands law school applicants each year and many with a lot better stats than 2.12 and 152 or 170 get rejected. Unless there are something unique in your application.

Do you have a plan B? 

 

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On 22/04/2018 at 10:29 AM, Sio said:

Hi everyone, I have a bit of a situation and I’m hoping you guys can help me out. I apologize in advance for the long story!

I applied to law school for September admissions and so far have been rejected from everywhere except Ottawa but I’m not holding my breath at all for that. I want to apply for the next cycle but I want to do that with confidence.

Due to medical reasons the first two years of my undergrad were real crappy and my overall GPA is extremely low 2.12. I know. It’s awful. I got an LSAT of 152 but am planning to rewrite in September and I want to shoot for the 170s to sort of compensate for my shitty GPA. I was practice testing in the 160s when I was studying and test day was just a bunch of nerves and I ended up with 152 but anyways I know I can achieve a way higher LSAT if I put a lot of work and effort in. 

 

Even if I manage to achieve a high LSAT score my GPA is way too low and my question is, what can I do to raise my GPA? I’ve looked into pursuing a masters but of course don’t meet the admission requirements. I also looked into going back to university to complete an extra year but all the deadlines have long passed and I would have to apply in 2019 and that will push my law school applications for entry in 2020. 

I would really like to spend this year doing things to improve my application and increase my competitiveness. I’ve asked some of the law school admissions on what I can do to improve my app and they said I had great volunteering/LORs and PS but the stats don’t prove my ability to handle law school. So they said if I could take some extra courses and raise my GPA I could have a shot for next year. 

So, do you guys have any advice for me? Is there anything I can do degree-wise that would raise my GPA or overall just improve my application? Or do you think that I can’t overcome my GPA and I should just consider another path all together? 

Any help you guys can provide would be much appreciated! Thank you! 

and please, no negative comments! 

What is your L2/B2? If you improve your LSAT by 8 point or more, and have a decent L2/B2 (3.5+), it's possible to get admissions at a school that accepts L2/B2.

However, this is a long shot in my personal opinion. I don't know how much more time and money you want to invest in trying to achieve a long shot. 

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36 minutes ago, conge said:

What is your L2/B2? If you improve your LSAT by 8 point or more, and have a decent L2/B2 (3.5+), it's possible to get admissions at a school that accepts L2/B2.

However, this is a long shot in my personal opinion. I don't know how much more time and money you want to invest in trying to achieve a long shot. 

My math is not really good

2.12 GPA x 4 years             = 8.48

with 3.5 L2 =               3.5 x 2 =7.00

that means year 1&% 2          =1.48/2 = .74

That will be a lot of Ds and Fs for year 1 and 2

 

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On ‎28‎/‎04‎/‎2018 at 10:54 AM, Luckycharm said:

My math is not really good

2.12 GPA x 4 years             = 8.48

with 3.5 L2 =               3.5 x 2 =7.00

that means year 1&% 2          =1.48/2 = .74

That will be a lot of Ds and Fs for year 1 and 2

 

So L2/B2 is a 3.5 average? That's a big jump from first 2 years being a 1.48 average. I think that will be looked upon favourably by admissions. If I were you, I'd concentrate on improving your LSAT. Set a study schedule and do lots of practice exams, like a couple a week or more. If you can achieve a 160+ score, you could get in somewhere.

 

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4 hours ago, conge said:

So L2/B2 is a 3.5 average? That's a big jump from first 2 years being a 1.48 average. I think that will be looked upon favourably by admissions. If I were you, I'd concentrate on improving your LSAT. Set a study schedule and do lots of practice exams, like a couple a week or more. If you can achieve a 160+ score, you could get in somewhere.

 

first and second year will be 0.74. That will be academic suspension in many universities

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