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Jamieson

High LSAT (173), abysmal gpa (2.0)

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I scored 173 on the LSAT, but my gpa is only a 2.0. Do I at least have a shot at some of these lower tier schools like Thompson River? For what it’s worth, I’d actually prefer to work at some small firm in flyover country (I imagine they’re less snobby about name brand).

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Posted (edited)

Is the 2.0 your cgpa? What are your l2? B2? L3? B3?

Edited by Meiteen7

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Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, Jamieson said:

I scored 173 on the LSAT, but my gpa is only a 2.0. Do I at least have a shot at some of these lower tier schools like Thompson River? For what it’s worth, I’d actually prefer to work at some small firm in flyover country (I imagine they’re less snobby about name brand).

Sure buddy, we'll see you applying for Bay Street jobs in a couple of years time! JK...sorta.

In any case, 2.0 is really low - what were you're last two years like? Best two years? There are schools that take those into account. Also, some schools just do a calculation based on GPA/LSAT, giving you an index score used for admission, and your LSAT may be high enough to offset the GPA, .

Do some research on the admissions pages of law school websites and find these schools. They aren't necessarily the "lower tier schools" (if there is such a thing in Canada).

Edited by conge
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Canada does not have a tiered system in terms of quality of education. It does have a number of schools that calculate GPA / LSAT / ECs along differing lines, and some that accept access or mature students under varying definitions. Look to each school. 

OP, you are what is termed a “splitter”. It may be helpful for you to search this forum using that term. Have you B2 and L2 in mind when you do. 

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Posted (edited)

I had a similar split though my cumulative GPA wasn't quite as low (though sub 3) and I was admitted broadly. I could also point to a couple of years of 3.5+ performance

Edited by Eeee

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Meiteen7 said:

Is the 2.0 your cgpa? What are your l2? B2? L3? B3?

Yes, 2.0 cgpa. Don’t remember exactly. All would be under 2.5 though.

2 hours ago, conge said:

Sure buddy, we'll see you applying for Bay Street jobs in a couple of years time! JK...sorta

😂

1 hour ago, Prospero said:

How did you manage a 2.0 but a 173? Also what's your B2/L2?

Personal issues combined with UofT’s brutal grading curve. Should’ve just done undergrad at Brock or something. 

As for the LSAT, I took a ton of practice tests at home over many months. I actually kind of enjoyed the process, unlike undergrad.

Edited by Jamieson
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Unfortunately, as for UVic's and UBC's index calculations, your 2.0 GPA brings you very far down and I don't think you can get accepted at either of those schools with your probably Index. 

Best of luck!

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Posted (edited)

Manitoba is a school that a) drops x amount of credits and b) uses a straight index to grant admission. They're probably gonna be one of your best bets. 

Edited by Inconspicuous

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2 hours ago, Jamieson said:

Personal issues combined with UofT’s brutal grading curve. Should’ve just done undergrad at Brock or something. 

As for the LSAT, I took a ton of practice tests at home over many months. I actually kind of enjoyed the process, unlike undergrad.

That's insane, is it really that bad? I've heard stories...

You honestly might want to consider the US with those stats, they care far more down there about LSAT than Canada does and you have a 99th percentile score. Your outcome down there may be better than in Canada even if you do get in to any of the law schools here. 

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Prospero said:

That's insane, is it really that bad? I've heard stories...

You honestly might want to consider the US with those stats, they care far more down there about LSAT than Canada does and you have a 99th percentile score. Your outcome down there may be better than in Canada even if you do get in to any of the law schools here. 

Unless you want to work in the US, I would not recommend going to a US school. I mean, if you get into the top US law schools (where there is a tier system), then it might be worth having that conversation, but I don't think that is a realistic prospect here.

OP: what was your program, and what were L2/B2? That could make a difference...

Edited by conge
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Posted (edited)

Is it a 170 or a 173? Did a mod edit the title?

Edited by chaboywb

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Hmm, I will make it 173 (if my phone lets me edit it).  Not sure what happened there. 

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18 hours ago, Jamieson said:

Yes, 2.0 cgpa. Don’t remember exactly. All would be under 2.5 though.

😂

Personal issues combined with UofT’s brutal grading curve. Should’ve just done undergrad at Brock or something. 

As for the LSAT, I took a ton of practice tests at home over many months. I actually kind of enjoyed the process, unlike undergrad.

I went to law school long enough ago that I can't give you any useful current advice (I mean, no better than what you'd find using Google!) but you have my sympathy and I wish you luck. I was in a similar situation to you  (including having gone to U of T) and I'm very happy to have gone to Queen's for law but was a waitlist admit (at several schools).

I can recall that my own faculty was encouraging me to go to grad school and essentially saying admission was guaranteed because I had very good marks (for engineering and my program), but the U of T law school's response to my application was something like, there's no possible way your final year's marks would be high enough for us to consider you, how dare you waste our time by applying and forcing us to use paper and postage to send you this rejection (well, I remember the first part, the second may be more my interpretation of the tone... :rolleyes:).

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25 minutes ago, chaboywb said:

Is it a 170 or a 173? Did a mod edit the title?

Good lawyer material

I am curious how many courses were below C-

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Some law schools like the University of Alberta exclusively look at your last 60 credits for admissions GPA. Have you considered maybe doing a two year after degree? 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, octoputin said:

Some law schools like the University of Alberta exclusively look at your last 60 credits for admissions GPA. Have you considered maybe doing a two year after degree? 

I think this would be a better option than going to a US school if OP wants to work in Canada. OP may not even need to do a full 60 credits, given their LSAT score (only write, I'm assuming?).

Edited by Psychometronic
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Psychometronic said:

I think this would be a better option than going to a US school if OP wants to work in Canada. OP may not even need to do a full 60 credits, given their LSAT score (only write, I'm assuming?).

Based on last year's profile of accepted applicants, a 3.3 GPA  based on the last 60 credits would be sufficient for someone with a 173 LSAT to secure admission. 

 

OP,  you should take this into consideration, you may only have to do part of an after degree to stand a decent chance of getting into Alberta law.....

Edited by octoputin

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On 4/12/2018 at 6:07 PM, Jamieson said:

Personal issues combined with UofT’s brutal grading curve. Should’ve just done undergrad at Brock or something. 

Ok let's play at that game.

 

Let's say u of t has a brutal curve. Even in a brutal curve people get As. Literally that's true unless u of t simply never gives out As. Which I don't believe, nor did you claim.

 

So some people get As. So how is the curve brutal? Well it still can be by assuming your classmates are all geniuses. Unless you're in a particular program like engineering science or the like, u of t simply doesn't have programs filled with geniuses to the extent that someone who can get a 173 on the lsat ended up sub median of the class (that's what it sounds like) for 4 years of schooling. 

 

So all that's left is you didn't try hard enough (unless you're part of the exception like engineering science and similar programs).

 

Congrats on the lsat. But don't be an asshole to other schools just because you likely didn't give a shit for 4 years.

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37 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Congrats on the lsat. But don't be an asshole to other schools just because you likely didn't give a shit for 4 years.

1

But surely if we're going to be assholes to a school, it should be Brock? I have to assume it's the only school in North America named after their first frat boy.

Just kidding. I don't know where Brock is, so I can't make fun of it. 

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