Jump to content
feblsatquestion

Potential Careers/Jobs for JD/MPP students?

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Hi everyone,

Just a bit of a back story: I was initially inclined to apply to law school around September of last year, but, over the course of several months have had a bit of a change in interests. I'm currently employed in the public sector and have really liked working here. In order to further my career interests within this sector, I chose to apply to the MPP program at U of T and recently secured admission. I will be attending the program this fall. I do, however, still hold an interest in attending law school at some point within the next 2-5 years.  

Here's my question: I've read previous threads on the combined JD/MGA program, and it was pretty clear to me that there are little to no employers that look for individuals who hold such degrees (or, rather, there are limited careers within the "international law" realm). I was wondering if it's a similar case for students holding a JD/MPP? As I understand it, positions at the MAG and Justice Department might tend to favor those who hold (or are pursuing) such degrees. Am I incorrect in understanding so?

Looking forward to your responses!

Edited by feblsatquestion

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think employers favour these degrees - they're cash grabs. MAG and Justice want strong students with good grades and demonstrated interest in the subject area. Your masters can't hurt and may help, but it's really your law school resume that is going to determine whether you get one of those jobs. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, providence said:

I don't think employers favour these degrees - they're cash grabs. MAG and Justice want strong students with good grades and demonstrated interest in the subject area. Your masters can't hurt and may help, but it's really your law school resume that is going to determine whether you get one of those jobs. 

Thanks for your reply, providence! As a follow-up, would you say a JD/MPP is a cash grab the way a JD/MGA might be? Additionally, and this might be naive of me, but wouldn't prior knowledge and experience in the public sector be attractive to employers for the aforementioned positions and/or showcase a demonstrated interest in the subject area? This is, of course, assuming one's grades aren't noncompetitive (which I understand is by no means a walk in the park). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • I don't think so! Esp. if you have significant jumps. 
    • Not to disagree on what probably isn't important at all, but I think the notion of burn out is often overstated and person-dependent. I spent far too long studying for the LSAT (about ~5 months total), and my progress went from a mid-150s to mid-160s pretty quickly, then a spotty performance with a wide range of low-160s to low-170s. It then took me a solid month of grinding it out daily (~8-10 hrs) to average ~177-178 (over a sample of ~20 PTs). 
    • Thank you for the positivity!! It is nice to know someone was on a similar boat as me. I am dedicated to putting in the time and effort for acing the LSAT. I know it is a very hard test, not something I can master in 3 months, more like a year. I am aware the courses will just help me understand concepts but if I want to master those concepts I have to put in a lot of time practicing. Do you teach classes in Toronto? Once again thanks for the positivity   It helps knowing I wont get it overnight, it will take time and effort to get it. Now I get why America believes the idea that a strong LSAT is a must for law school and luck with the bar. FYI, I read this in a law school blog, its someone's opinion do not bash me for it.  YEs very true, its something costly mentally and financially. For now, I am    
    • Hi everyone,  I've written both the September and November LSAT, and am wondering if it would look bad on my application that I've done the LSAT 3 times. I know most schools just look at your highest score but I'm sure they see that I've done it multiple times. I didn't have much time to study for these last two tests, although hopefully I did better on today's than September. I'll have much longer to study for the January and am hoping that will give me an advantage. Any advice is appreciated!
    • Congratulations!  Are you waiting on any other acceptances?   
×