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Prospero

Is law school fun?

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My undergrad was very difficult and, at times, quite stressful, but overall I made some great friends, grew up and learned a great deal, and ultimately I would say it was a very exciting and fun experience. Would you law students/lawyers say that law school is "fun"? I'm not looking for fun in the "party every day" sense, but rather in the daily experience of law school - classes, interviews, meeting new people, law school assignments, being a student (again) on campus, going to bar nights, etc. If it makes a difference I'll be starting at U of T in August. 

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Yeah, it's alright. I'd say it was fun in 1L - you meet all new people, learn a ton, feel way smarter and more accomplished by the end of it, etc. - but now that I'm at the end of 2L it feels more like a grind. Especially if you're going straight from undergrad to law school with no break in between it feels like a lot of schooling with very little exposure to the practical working world. 

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I thought it was fun. I loved the new experiences, I met some of the best, amazing friends I’ve ever had and we had good times, I love the intellectual challenge of learning the material and I had great extra-curricular experiences like mooting (and I got to travel and see more of the country) and doing research for profs. I really miss those days. Don’t get me wrong, there were some tough times too, but overall, I loved it.

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Posted (edited)

My experience was similar to Grey's except the part about feeling way smarter and more accomplished by the end of 1L.

Edited by Edmontonlawyer
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I'm excited to be a student again. Though technically I'm a student in grad school right now, it feels more like a job in that I go in every day, put in my 9-5, then leave. I never thought I'd say this but I miss exams - late nights studying in the library, drinking gallons of coffee, the anxiety of waiting to receive grades. I feel nostalgic for those days. I'm sure I'll both love and hate some aspects, but I think it will be more fun than what I'm doing now.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Prospero said:

 Would you law students/lawyers say that law school is "fun"? 

Surely it's subjective, so you're going to get mixed reviews. Also, it will depend on where you go and with whom you have class and spend time. I sincerely loved law school. I was highly involved socially and academically, and made maximum use of my tuition--I made sure I always had something to do. I had incredible and passionate professors who were great at their jobs and whose passion was contagious. I had excellent classmates and friends who eased the pressure of performing, and who never really exacerbated any sort of overwhelming competition.

I get that not everyone has the same experience (or may even be capable of that same experience for a variety of reasons) but in my view the best way to approach law school is to go with the flow, allow yourself to be easily fascinated, and make and take opportunities wherever they arise. Unless you have to for some reason, don't just go to class and go home. Don't just read the readings and write the exam. Get into it, and you'll have a great time; that'll position you well to love practice, too.

Edited by FineCanadianFXs
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6 minutes ago, chaboywb said:

I'm excited to be a student again. Though technically I'm a student in grad school right now, it feels more like a job in that I go in every day, put in my 9-5, then leave. I never thought I'd say this but I miss exams - late nights studying in the library, drinking gallons of coffee, the anxiety of waiting to receive grades. I feel nostalgic for those days. I'm sure I'll both love and hate some aspects, but I think it will be more fun than what I'm doing now.

Law school is a lot more fund than grad school, I'll tell you that.  

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It could be worse, it could be better. It's what you make of it. 

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Did you go to U of T for your undergrad? If you did, you should know full well that "fun" is a forbidden word that may not be said within 500 meters of campus. EVER.

It's why Robarts has no windows: sunshine gives people hope, and hope is too pedestrian a concept.

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OP - with disclaimers my experience was long ago - make friends in law school, have fun with friends, etc., but many other people (not all) in law school may often be stressed-out and not all that fun, and who may at various times may bring you down. That said, I even found law school much more fun than engineering, both academically and extracurricularly (social/parties/drinking/athletics).
And sometimes non-law people can provide balance (even in 1L housemates, and 2L and 3L also university activities).

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Posted (edited)

Law school being fun depends on your expectations.

If you are a corporate gunner and need those marks, it won't at all. If undergrad was stressful for you, oh boy you're in for a treat. If you land the 1L job things are sweet, while those still looking in 3L probably didn't have the best time overall. Results may vary between different schools and different class years.

If you aren't planning on a hyper competitive field to practice in, and grades aren't a crushing demand on you constantly, you can have a lot of fun in law school. I think the people who have the most fun are the ones who were the most diligent in undergrad who didn't take full advantage of going out as much as they could have. Law school has a kind of high school feel to it, except the jocks aren't king, rather there isn't much of a hierarchy. As it was with high school, law school will be as fun as you make it. You need to met people of your own volition, and not expect friends to be handed to you.

I'll echo what the others have said, generally the new and likable things that happen are in 1L, but it is the most stressful time. If you can keep the stress separate from your social life you should be alright. After 1L its more of the same, which can be a good or bad thing depending on what you make it.

Edited by Kemair
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1 hour ago, epeeist said:

OP - with disclaimers my experience was long ago - make friends in law school, have fun with friends, etc., but many other people (not all) in law school may often be stressed-out and not all that fun, and who may at various times may bring you down. That said, I even found law school much more fun than engineering, both academically and extracurricularly (social/parties/drinking/athletics).
And sometimes non-law people can provide balance (even in 1L housemates, and 2L and 3L also university activities).

Oh! That reminds me. In first term of 1L, I made a bunch of really good friends in 3L and tried to stay out of all the jockeying and stressing of 1L. After 1L exams when people knew where they stood, accepted it and calmed down, I made a few friends in my year. The beginning of 2L was hard at first as a lot of my good friends were gone, but then I made more friends in my year and some in 3L, and also with some transfer students. I think not being too involved with my classmates at the beginning of law school was good for me. Definitely also try to have/keep non-law friends, which is harder if you're going to school in a new city, but you can do it through sports, clubs etc connected to the wider university community.

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4 hours ago, Kemair said:

Law school being fun depends on your expectations.

If you are a corporate gunner and need those marks, it won't at all. If undergrad was stressful for you, oh boy you're in for a treat. If you land the 1L job things are sweet, while those still looking in 3L probably didn't have the best time overall. Results may vary between different schools and different class years.

If you aren't planning on a hyper competitive field to practice in, and grades aren't a crushing demand on you constantly, you can have a lot of fun in law school. I think the people who have the most fun are the ones who were the most diligent in undergrad who didn't take full advantage of going out as much as they could have. Law school has a kind of high school feel to it, except the jocks aren't king, rather there isn't much of a hierarchy. As it was with high school, law school will be as fun as you make it. You need to met people of your own volition, and not expect friends to be handed to you.

I'll echo what the others have said, generally the new and likable things that happen are in 1L, but it is the most stressful time. If you can keep the stress separate from your social life you should be alright. After 1L its more of the same, which can be a good or bad thing depending on what you make it.

3

I would disagree specifically with the bolded. I've been pretty confident I wanted to do the Bay Street thing, and I haven't found my law school experience to be a "crushing demand on [me] constantly." 

I think law school is what you make of it, regardless of your career goals etc. 

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4 hours ago, Kemair said:

Law school being fun depends on your expectations.

If you are a corporate gunner and need those marks, it won't at all. If undergrad was stressful for you, oh boy you're in for a treat. If you land the 1L job things are sweet, while those still looking in 3L probably didn't have the best time overall. Results may vary between different schools and different class years.

If you aren't planning on a hyper competitive field to practice in, and grades aren't a crushing demand on you constantly, you can have a lot of fun in law school. I think the people who have the most fun are the ones who were the most diligent in undergrad who didn't take full advantage of going out as much as they could have. Law school has a kind of high school feel to it, except the jocks aren't king, rather there isn't much of a hierarchy. As it was with high school, law school will be as fun as you make it. You need to met people of your own volition, and not expect friends to be handed to you.

 

By that logic... Lakehead and Windsor are the "most fun" law schools in Ontario? 

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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, BayStreetOrBust said:

 

By that logic... Lakehead and Windsor are the "most fun" law schools in Ontario? 

Oooh, this is a golden opportunity for a ranking of law schools by "fun factor"

Someone contact University Magazine.

Edited by BlockedQuebecois
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Posted (edited)

As you can see, all sorts of opinions.

I enjoyed 1L. The material was new, there was a lot to learn but by no means too much, there was opportunity to do your own thing, a career to start figuring out, ... it's a big space to learn a cool new thing and start building your next steps.

I got lucky with an early job offer in 2L, but from the looks of it, 2L for most students at UT was about the stress of OCIs and the de-stressification afterward/ramped up stress for those with less fortune. I was bored in law school for 2L and 3L, but they provided enough free time to take up projects I was interested in entirely outside of school. Basically, I paid for 2 years for someone to babysit me a few hours a week against my will and give me a reading list. If I hadn't had to pay them for that, it would have been great. 

Edited by theycancallyouhoju
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The classes and academic stuff is too dependent on the person. I have no idea if you will like it. I thought it was ok. I had some fun classes and some where I had trouble staying awake for more than 10 minutes a lecture. Learning the 'law' was not as interesting as I thought it would be but it was still alright.

In general, theres periods of stress  (exams, big paper), especially in 1L when you're figuring some stuff out. But theres a lot of downtime, especially in upper years. You meet good people, and try to get involved without stressing yourself out. Do a mix of academic and fun activities - thats what really helped me. Like, I played sports and also did clinics so I felt like i got some practical knowledge but also had fun.  Try to go out to the social events. Stay on good/neutral terms with people and ignore any high school type bullshit. 

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1L was very fun for me. It was stressful, sure, but also fun. 2L has been an absolute grind. I got a job early but the stress from the build up to that process takes a while to go away. After that, there's nothing you're really working towards so all of the work feels much less important and tends to drag. I've heard 3L is a fun, especially if you go on exchange. Obviously can't comment on that yet but fingers crossed. 

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