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bailiwick

Chances? 3.83 OLSAS / 155 LSAT

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Hey everyone, now that I have some choices of schools I want to know what my chances at Queen's are.

I have a 3.83 CGPA from OLSAS (about a 3.85 L2 I believe) and a 155 LSAT. I know that my GPA is decent enough but Queen's states that an LSAT of less than 157 is not competitive. Do you any of you think that my GPA would be able to compensate for those two points I'm missing on the LSAT and have any of you seen a student admitted with an LSAT lower than 157?

Thanks for taking the time to read and respond to this!

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I got in this cycle with 155,156 - 3.37 CGPA and 3.86 L2 

 

you can PM me if you'd like! Your stats are great - LSAT obviously can be improved if you're willing to put the time into it but could be well worth

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I have similar stats cGPA 3.94 and LSAT 158 and i'm still waiting to hear back as Queen's is my top choice - fingers crossed for us!

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16 minutes ago, HTGAWM said:

I have similar stats cGPA 3.94 and LSAT 158 and i'm still waiting to hear back as Queen's is my top choice - fingers crossed for us!

In the same boat as you guys, 3.78 CGPA B2/L2: 3.85, LSAT 158. Hopefully we hear soon. 

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1 hour ago, beaner2017 said:

I got in this cycle with 155,156 - 3.37 CGPA and 3.86 L2 

 

you can PM me if you'd like! Your stats are great - LSAT obviously can be improved if you're willing to put the time into it but could be well worth

Congrats on getting in! If you don't mind me asking, how much EC's did you have and do you think your PS's and references were great? I have similar stats and I have not recieved word yet for this round so I'm just wondering where I might stand, you give me a bit of hope!! :) Also, you applied general category, correct? 

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6 hours ago, bailiwick said:

Hey everyone, now that I have some choices of schools I want to know what my chances at Queen's are.

I have a 3.83 CGPA from OLSAS (about a 3.85 L2 I believe) and a 155 LSAT. I know that my GPA is decent enough but Queen's states that an LSAT of less than 157 is not competitive. Do you any of you think that my GPA would be able to compensate for those two points I'm missing on the LSAT and have any of you seen a student admitted with an LSAT lower than 157?

Thanks for taking the time to read and respond to this!

 

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Thanks for your reply folks. Just to clarify for anyone chiming in, I applied in the general category. Good luck to all of us!

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On 3/21/2018 at 1:45 PM, bailiwick said:

Hey everyone, now that I have some choices of schools I want to know what my chances at Queen's are.

I have a 3.83 CGPA from OLSAS (about a 3.85 L2 I believe) and a 155 LSAT. I know that my GPA is decent enough but Queen's states that an LSAT of less than 157 is not competitive. Do you any of you think that my GPA would be able to compensate for those two points I'm missing on the LSAT and have any of you seen a student admitted with an LSAT lower than 157?

Thanks for taking the time to read and respond to this!

Hello! I was just wondering what ended up happening with your application - my stats are almost identical. Thanks!

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On 9/6/2019 at 6:07 PM, Ladybug8712 said:

Hello! I was just wondering what ended up happening with your application - my stats are almost identical. Thanks!

If I were you I'd retake the lsat 155 is slim to none chances.

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This thread is a year and a half old and the OP has not visited the site in months. If you have a question about your chances, please start a new thread. Thanks.

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