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mootqueenJD69

What should I do after I get my rejection?

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Fellow patrons of lawstudents.ca come to me in my time of need! It is I, mootqueenJD69, and I find myself sorely in need of advice.

As I refreshed Minerva for the 97th time today I realized that my life is much like a movie in which the viewer has lost all interest. Upon watching for 25 minutes I am no longer concerned with the anxieties of the main character. When had my life become a b rated horror film? Absorbed in my nihilism, I have taken to contemplating what I should do, not if but when I am rejected from McGill law. Netizens of lawstudents.ca please aid me in deciding how to move forward with my life, as in my current state I am too weak to decide for myself. 

I do not want to hear "but mootqueenJD69, your beauty and intelligence are unsurpassed! It's only the beginning of the acceptance cycle, give it some more time and you'll get in!" I have already resigned myself to my imminent failure and I am here for steadfast and stoic wisdom, not your consolation or pity lawstudents.ca. Do not look down on me with those piercing eyes filled with disappointment and disgust. 

Before I lay out my options moving forward into the dismal abyss that is my future, I would like to briefly appease any moderators who would question the substance of my plea. You may be thinking "this poor soul should get some professional help" or "this query is better suited to the general discussion thread" or "how does this differ from a standard rejected thread, what makes you so unique, mootqueenJD69?" I will address each of these concerns, in reverse ascending order. Fret not compatriots for I am of sound mind. This is but the manifestation of the anxieties of acceptance, a rite of passage bringing all self-doubting undergrads to the brink of sanity. But it is only on the brink that true genius is born. You will soon see, dear moderators, that the substance of my philosophical exploration is predicated on the specificity of the rejection: I do not ask "what should I do when I get rejected" but rather "what should I do when I get rejected from McGill". Mod Gods, I submit to you that this is not your average rejection thread. It has taken four paragraphs to circumscribe the parameters of the question and justify the inquiry. There will be intimate depth and detail contrasted with disconcerting ubiquity: bringing to the fore the inescapable notion that no one is mootqueenJD69, but in a far greater sense, we are all mootqueenJD69  

The first, and most straightforward answer to the question "what should I do when I get rejected by McGill Law" is move to Montreal and study French intensively. The reasons for this are threefold: 1. My French is relatively weak and this is a great way to improve for reapplication. 2. What better way to fulfill my masochistic cravings than to watch all the joyous 1L's trance their way through my dream world, oblivious to my suffering? 3. I can get a job cleaning the law school classrooms in the evenings and complete unfinished moot court problems that have been left on the chalkboard. A professor will eventually recognize my genius and invite me to work with them as their equal. I will be forced to reevaluate my relationship with everyone in my life and confront my past while thinking about my future.

My second option is to pursue a 1-year master's degree while I wait to relive the mental health meat grinder that is the law school application process. I have applied to two such programs. One in the heartland of southern Ontario and another in a tropic locale where the rainy season is short and they serve pina coladas on the beach. Both involve studying law in some capacity. My concern here is that I will get swallowed in the vacuum of academia and never emerge to claim my rightful place as a hollow and soulless 1L. 

As my third option, I could escape into the wilderness for a period of 6-12 months. I believe this is what my generation calls “finding myself”. I would take a page from Cheryl Strayed and hop on one of those big long hikes in the US. But would I be able to bolster my French while I did this? How would it improve my application for the next cycle?

I eagerly await your response in my time of need lawstudents.ca all all creative suggestions and advice accepted. Until then I will continue to ride the RfR train into oblivion.

XOXO, 
mootqueenJD69
 

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If it is alright to ask, what is your financial situation? Your second and third option relies on money that might be better applied going to law school for the year after, depending either on the cost of studying or travel. If you have more than enough funds, then either of them seem like good choices. If I were you, I would be more inclined for the Masters, since it might come in handy when it's time for OCIs. You might also not have the energy or time for doing a masters after completing your law degree, if you were inclined to do that as well.

Moving to Montreal will help with French, and is more affordable than most major Canadian cities at this point, but don't forget to look into more French options in your home location. Every province has a Francophone population, and with that means tutoring or schools you can attend to practice without needing to make the permanent move or if you are travelling/ studying your Masters elsewhere. 

Finally, as much as you said you do not want reassurances - the odds are still in your favour. There is still a month to go, stop checking Minerva and just make sure your email is set up on your phone. The waiting game is the hardest part, but its hard because of what you get out of it. 

If you just posted this to come up with good back up plans though, I apologize, and will refrain from attempting to reassure :P 

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I'd take a deep breath and not condemn yourself until you hear back. I was in the same boat as you - a month ago I convinced myself that I was never going to hear back from any schools and that my dreams were up in smoke (yes, in December, barely a month after applying). I'm now in at three schools and feel like an idiot for ever acting that way.

With that being said, of your three options I'd go with A. I'd never recommend anyone pay out of pocket for a Masters degree, and you may travel all around the States only to find that yourself was in Montreal the whole time. I'd say kill two birds with one stone.

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I am a little confused? has the peak of the admission releases been done AND if we have not heard yet it means that rejection is more likely?

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1 hour ago, dentlaw said:

I am a little confused? has the peak of the admission releases been done AND if we have not heard yet it means that rejection is more likely?

I would be interested in knowing this as well. When exactly are the majority of acceptances released? Jan? Feb?

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Well, if all else fails, I think you definitely have a career in writing so there's that.

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If you look back at the last 3 years, most acceptances were sent out in February - so if pattern follows, it has not yet peaked. Rejections come in March as McGill talks to mature and CEGEP students. If you don't hear back by March, it means you are somewhere between being accepted and not accepted - competitive, but depending on how the mature and CEGEP students do in their applications. 

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why don't you apply more law school rather than Mcgill law ? people generally apply multiple  law schools,  4 is not a lot .  7 schools is probably average.  Applying all the law school in Canada is probably costly. 

Edited by akulamasusu

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If you're going to Quebec to study French (and the rest of your application is sound), I'd recommend against acquiring full time student status at a public institution. You'll qualify for the Quebec tuition rate after a year and can apply that to the B.C.L./LL.B. program.

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15 hours ago, msk2012 said:

If you're going to Quebec to study French (and the rest of your application is sound), I'd recommend against acquiring full time student status at a public institution. You'll qualify for the Quebec tuition rate after a year and can apply that to the B.C.L./LL.B. program.

100 percent this. Please, save yourself the 15 grand and hassles that come with living in Quebec without being a Quebec resident (health care, etc) if you can.

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lawstudents of the web, near and far, thank you for heeding my call of distress. It gladdens me to know that you are willing to impart your sobering wisdom even upon the likes of a lowly applicant such as I. Alas, all my planning was for naught, I am doomed to enter the halls of McGill as a pale and hollow 1L, devoid of any meaning beyond that which will be imparted to me through McGill's uniquely bilingual and comparative program of legal studies. I suppose I will never feel the heat of the tropical sun upon my brow as I research the finer points of international relations, nor will I work the cramps from my feet as I finish the final summit of the Appalachian trail, I am doomed to claim the destiny of my namesake, to be the mootqueen of McGill Law. For your excellent and well thought out advice I have rewarded you with numerous upvotes; may your prestige continue to grow as you counsel the other lost souls of lawstudents.ca! 

Yours in satire,

XOXO

mootqueenJD69

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3 minutes ago, mootqueenJD69 said:

lawstudents of the web, near and far, thank you for heeding my call of distress. It gladdens me to know that you are willing to impart your sobering wisdom even upon the likes of a lowly applicant such as I. Alas, all my planning was for naught, I am doomed to enter the halls of McGill as a pale and hollow 1L, devoid of any meaning beyond that which will be imparted to me through McGill's uniquely bilingual and comparative program of legal studies. I suppose I will never feel the heat of the tropical sun upon my brow as I research the finer points of international relations, nor will I work the cramps from my feet as I finish the final summit of the Appalachian trail, I am doomed to claim the destiny of my namesake, to be the mootqueen of McGill Law. For your excellent and well thought out advice I have rewarded you with numerous upvotes; may your prestige continue to grow as you counsel the other lost souls of lawstudents.ca! 

Yours in satire,

XOXO

mootqueenJD69

Congrats :)!

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Also.. It's a bit unfortunate that your username is JD and you're going to McGill Law - you now have a false identity!

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On 3/25/2018 at 1:12 PM, mootqueenJD69 said:

lawstudents of the web, near and far, thank you for heeding my call of distress. It gladdens me to know that you are willing to impart your sobering wisdom even upon the likes of a lowly applicant such as I. Alas, all my planning was for naught, I am doomed to enter the halls of McGill as a pale and hollow 1L, devoid of any meaning beyond that which will be imparted to me through McGill's uniquely bilingual and comparative program of legal studies. I suppose I will never feel the heat of the tropical sun upon my brow as I research the finer points of international relations, nor will I work the cramps from my feet as I finish the final summit of the Appalachian trail, I am doomed to claim the destiny of my namesake, to be the mootqueen of McGill Law. For your excellent and well thought out advice I have rewarded you with numerous upvotes; may your prestige continue to grow as you counsel the other lost souls of lawstudents.ca! 

Yours in satire,

XOXO

mootqueenJD69

Seriously, you should really consider a career in writing -- at least on the side or something.

 

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Posted (edited)

I think the only question is: What is your dream? If you have a dream (if you actually have one, not if you think/say you do), then you pursue it no matter how long it takes.

If your dream is to go to McGill or become a lawyer, and you get rejected, I think you should feel zen. Because you should know, deep inside you, that no matter how long it takes, you will keep doing everything you can until you do finally get it.

I wouldn't worry about it at all if it was me. Here are 10 things you can do:

  • Learn French
  • Write a paper about law (I think it's easy to research some areas of the law, for example a narrow issue)
  • Get better letters of recommendation
  • Do research for professors
  • Get legal experience doing research for lawyers (e.g. on non-law issues, such as policy, etc)
  • Work for free part-time at a NGO related to law
  • Get involved in community
  • Volunteer at McGill events
  • Attend events at McGill law school
  • Meet McGill law students and learn more about the actual experience
  • etc, etc, etc.

Good luck, don't give up on your dreams!

Edited by chirico

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1) The first step is to look at your financial situation. Do you have any money saved up, are you running into money soon, etc...? Because life is really about cash. If you have nothing saved up then begin working and saving money.
NB: Keep saving until one day you have enough to invest and 'live off the fat of the land'. This is a life lesson, but something you should get on immediately. You'll find that afters taxes it's difficult to make money and keep it as gold, so starting to save at an early age is most important.

2) Assess whether you really like law. Law requires certain attributes: Are you liked by colleagues? Are you also aggressive? Are you organized and persuasive? If you have sufficient money and fit this mold, then go the low rent route without earning much until you finally get in. In Canada - and this is vital - it is utterly irrelevant which law school you go to, and you should get into one decent one. If you don't have money, work and apply.

3) If you feel law isn't your cup of tea and you don't need money, do math. It'll show you to condense everything into pure understanding and bliss. If you don't have money, work and take professional exams or something, or go into scientific academia.

 

 

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I agree. If you can be happy another way than being a lawyer and it's not your dream, keep an open eye for the many options that there are. You would be surprised how "regular" people can make a lot of money in a "normal" job with many weeks of vacations and many quick promotions.

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While @mootqueenJD69 was accepted (and there is no denying their talent for descriptive writing abilities), I was rejected a few months ago like hundreds of others who applied.  I feel that @mootqueenJD69 wrote this January 30, 2018 message for those who are still recuperating from their refusal (I know there are a few of us). 

This is just a small message to wish @mootqueenJD69 et al. the very best living the dreams of all of us who were refused.  On behalf of us who applied for 2018 admission, we wish the 2018 acceptances the very best and we now have to carry on and make the best of our own talents. 

All the best to the 2019 applicants. I'd suggest anyone to not just apply to McGill, especially if you're a French speaker (many other law schools in the province of Quebec). It's a very long journey and you are not alone when you start feeling anxiety in March, April, and in May and beyond.
  
 

Edited by WaitingOnTheHorizon

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10 hours ago, WaitingOnTheHorizon said:

While @mootqueenJD69 was accepted (and there is no denying their talent for descriptive writing abilities), I was rejected a few months ago like hundreds of others who applied.  I feel that @mootqueenJD69 wrote this January 30, 2018 message for those who are still recuperating from their refusal (I know there are a few of us). 

This is just a small message to wish @mootqueenJD69 et al. the very best living the dreams of all of us who were refused.  On behalf of us who applied for 2018 admission, we wish the 2018 acceptances the very best and we now have to carry on and make the best of our own talents. 

All the best to the 2019 applicants. I'd suggest anyone to not just apply to McGill, especially if you're a French speaker (many other law schools in the province of Quebec). It's a very long journey and you are not alone when you start feeling anxiety in March, April, and in May and beyond.
  
 

I'm sorry to hear that. I'm not sure if you did apply to other schools, but if you didn't - I recommend you re-apply (if you want) and broadly too. Call the admissions office to see what weaknesses (if any) your application had. If you didn't write the lsat - see how you do on a diagnostic and consider writing it to up your chances. 

All the best.

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