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BlockedQuebecois

Ask a 1L — 2018 Edition

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15 hours ago, harveyspecter993 said:

I'm thinking over whether I should sell my printer or bring it with me. As a law student, is there a lot of printing you have to do?

I got myself a black and white laser and I'm really glad I have it. A summary can be 120 pages+ and there's reprints etc if needed.

I went through 4000 pages since 1L (finishing 2L now). I'd keep it. 

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1 minute ago, Rascal2017 said:

Would there be any need for a colour laser printer or should I just stick to a black and white one?

 I use a coloured printer for my summaries because I use different colours to indicate different things. Ie: cases might be one colour, legislation might be another. I’m sure you could get away with black and white. I wouldn’t advise attempting to print large coloured documents at school though as it would be really costly. 

Alternatively you could get away with printing your notes in black and white and just use highlighters and pens to colour code things. That would be more than fine and would likely save you the extra money

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21 hours ago, Rascal2017 said:

Would there be any need for a colour laser printer or should I just stick to a black and white one?

 

21 hours ago, healthlaw said:

use a coloured printer for my summaries because I use different colours to indicate different things. Ie: cases might be one colour, legislation might be another. I’m sure you could get away with black and white. I wouldn’t advise attempting to print large coloured documents at school though as it would be really costly. 

Alternatively you could get away with printing your notes in black and white and just use highlighters and pens to colour code things. That would be more than fine and would likely save you the extra money

The YFS print shop in york lanes is crazy cheap for colour printing. I get my summaries printed in colour and bound with front and back cover for ~$8/50 pages. 

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31 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

 

The YFS print shop in york lanes is crazy cheap for colour printing. I get my summaries printed in colour and bound with front and back cover for ~$8/50 pages. 

WHAT!?!!!!!!! I’m so mad that I’m learning about this in my last week of 3L. I’m actually mad lol. That hurts 

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Just thought of a question. Considering the fact that most students get a “B”, in your opinion, what is it the “A” students do that results in them getting an “A” and not a “B”? Correct me if I am wrong but I assume most people would write somewhat similar ideas in the exam...? So is it a combination of things that the “A” papers have done differently (i.e., writing style, spotting more issues, actually answering the question) that results in the “A”? Thanks! :) 

Edited by LivePumpkin
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15 hours ago, LivePumpkin said:

Just thought of a question. Considering the fact that most students get a “B”, in your opinion, what is it the “A” students do that results in them getting an “A” and not a “B”? Correct me if I am wrong but I assume most people would write somewhat similar ideas in the exam...? So is it a combination of things that the “A” papers have done differently (i.e., writing style, spotting more issues, actually answering the question) that results in the “A”? Thanks! :) 

I’m travelling right now, but have a good answer to this. I’ll try to get a moment to respond in the next few days once I’m at a computer.  It’ll be more coherent that way :P 

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1 hour ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

I’m travelling right now, but have a good answer to this. I’ll try to get a moment to respond in the next few days once I’m at a computer.  It’ll be more coherent that way :P 

Take your time and enjoy yourself! :) 

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19 hours ago, LivePumpkin said:

Just thought of a question. Considering the fact that most students get a “B”, in your opinion, what is it the “A” students do that results in them getting an “A” and not a “B”? Correct me if I am wrong but I assume most people would write somewhat similar ideas in the exam...? So is it a combination of things that the “A” papers have done differently (i.e., writing style, spotting more issues, actually answering the question) that results in the “A”? Thanks! :) 

Of your list, writing style is the least important.  Most exams are garbage stream-of-consciousness writing due to time constraints and the lack of editing time.  Actually answering the question is occasionally a problem, but most people don't totally miss the boat in that way.  The most relevant on this list is issue spotting, but I would put it differently.  Most people spot all of the correct issues, with a possible exception being an issue spotting exam with tons of little issues (often characteristic of a class like torts, as compared to something like constitutional).  With a B exam, most people are spotting the relevant issues and stating the law correctly.  Where A exams tend to be distinguished is in the way that they apply the law to the facts.  They will engage very deeply with the facts and pull every possible relevant fact and use it is every relevant way.  The As also tend to be better at engaging with counter-arguments.  They also tend to not just pull the legal rules out of the cases that were read, but have a superior ability to draw factual parallels between the exam problem and the cases read for class.

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8 hours ago, ProfReader said:

Of your list, writing style is the least important.  Most exams are garbage stream-of-consciousness writing due to time constraints and the lack of editing time.  Actually answering the question is occasionally a problem, but most people don't totally miss the boat in that way.  The most relevant on this list is issue spotting, but I would put it differently.  Most people spot all of the correct issues, with a possible exception being an issue spotting exam with tons of little issues (often characteristic of a class like torts, as compared to something like constitutional).  With a B exam, most people are spotting the relevant issues and stating the law correctly.  Where A exams tend to be distinguished is in the way that they apply the law to the facts.  They will engage very deeply with the facts and pull every possible relevant fact and use it is every relevant way.  The As also tend to be better at engaging with counter-arguments.  They also tend to not just pull the legal rules out of the cases that were read, but have a superior ability to draw factual parallels between the exam problem and the cases read for class.

Thank you. This was very informative.

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Also, this certainly isn't a universal truth, but students often seem to become law people or fact people when they are rushed, panicked, or whatever.  That is, they gravitate towards talking about the law but leaving out the facts (i.e. describing the Oakes test at length but not really pulling in the facts to apply it) or talking about the facts but leaving out the law (i.e. talking about how someone's conduct is really annoying, persistent, of low value, etc. but then not really bringing in the law of nuisance).  Again, this isn't universally true, but after you get a set of exams back, see if you are one of these people and try to be aware of it.

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1 hour ago, ProfReader said:

Also, this certainly isn't a universal truth, but students often seem to become law people or fact people when they are rushed, panicked, or whatever.  That is, they gravitate towards talking about the law but leaving out the facts (i.e. describing the Oakes test at length but not really pulling in the facts to apply it) or talking about the facts but leaving out the law (i.e. talking about how someone's conduct is really annoying, persistent, of low value, etc. but then not really bringing in the law of nuisance).  Again, this isn't universally true, but after you get a set of exams back, see if you are one of these people and try to be aware of it.

It's so great to have profs on here. This is basically office hours.

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The answer above is really good comprehensive advice. 

I screenshot this page from a US law school forum back when I was in 1L and tried to stick with it as best as I could through all my exams (recognizing time constraints etc.), to decent effect. 

For further nuance, I think what really separates the "B+" answer from an "A" answer is (once you have already identified arguments on both sides) a thoughtful evaluation of the relative strength of each argument and what ultimately the issue should "turn" on. Is it indeed a narrower set of facts that tilts us in one direction? Or an important policy consideration? Or a more persuasive jurisdiction, more recent case etc - and explain why. 

2004 Mich. St. L. Rev. 1 wrote:
5 - precisely identified issue, argued from facts, precedent and policy as appropriate, examined BOTH SIDES of arguments, evaluated relative strength of argument, noted relationship of issue to other issues and overall outcome

4 - clearly identified issue, noted arguments for BOTH SIDES but presented well developed argument for one side only, drew conclusion with some relationship to overall outcome

3 - clearly identified issue, argued one side only, drew summary conclusion

2 - identified issue, articulated but did not apply legal standards for resolution of the issue, drew summary conclusion

1 - identified issue and drew summary conclusion

0 - missed issue, stated rules without identifying issue
Edited by OzStudent
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On 4/26/2018 at 11:31 PM, LivePumpkin said:

Wow, THANK YOU both for such thorough and insightful answers! 

And thank you for asking the question in the first place.

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Haven’t even begun courses yet but I can already tell Osgoode was the right decision and that there exist a stong supportive environment among the students.

Thank you to you all for your gracious answers and for giving us your time. 

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Less a question strictly for those in L1 but, could anyone shed some light on what the selection of Osgoode apparel is like at the Keele Bookstore East? 

I was hoping to grab a few things for the summer months prior to school but noticed the bookstore at Osgoode closed for the summer as of April 9th. Is the selection of sweaters and such decent at the Keele bookstore east? 

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1 hour ago, LeoandCharlie said:

Less a question strictly for those in L1 but, could anyone shed some light on what the selection of Osgoode apparel is like at the Keele Bookstore East? 

I was hoping to grab a few things for the summer months prior to school but noticed the bookstore at Osgoode closed for the summer as of April 9th. Is the selection of sweaters and such decent at the Keele bookstore east? 

I checked it out last week when I was passing by the campus. There wasn't much in terms of selection. Just a couple red hoodies with the school name on them!  Nothing special or even close to the variety available on the site at the moment. Your best bet is to place an order online IMO!

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