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dritchi

Do law schools look at general bachelor of arts differently from honour bachelor of arts?

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I am thinking about maybe getting a three-year general degree instead of a four-year honours degree. My CGPA is a 3.8 at this point and I am going into my second semester of third year. My university allows me to change my bachelor of arts from an honours to a general degree. I was just wondering if this change would impact my ability for getting into law school. Do law schools look at general bachelor of arts different from honours bachelor of arts? 

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As far as I can tell they prefer 4 year degrees over 3 year degrees, but they do accept people with 3 year degrees (at least my school does), there just aren’t very many people around who have 3 year degrees. 

If it was me I’d do the 4 year degree. 

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[PSA to people who are not in Ontario: an “honour” degree means a 4 year degree. Not a specialized degree, as it does in other provinces.]

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4 minutes ago, Hegdis said:

[PSA to people who are not in Ontario: an “honour” degree means a 4 year degree. Not a specialized degree, as it does in other provinces.]

Ohhhhhhh. On U of T's brochure it said that 95% of their admitted students had completed an honours degree and I was flabbergasted, I had no idea that doing a senior thesis was so important. Now I see what all the hubbub was about...

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2 hours ago, Hegdis said:

[PSA to people who are not in Ontario: an “honour” degree means a 4 year degree. Not a specialized degree, as it does in other provinces.]

Yeah. For example for those from Ontario unfamiliar, at McGill, most Arts humanities honours majors versus the normal major (which is an 'honours' degree in Ontario) are near double the credits, and usually require about 10% of your degree at the graduate level.

Edited by BeltOfScotch

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21 hours ago, DenningsSkiTrip said:

As far as I can tell they prefer 4 year degrees over 3 year degrees, but they do accept people with 3 year degrees (at least my school does), there just aren’t very many people around who have 3 year degrees. 

If it was me I’d do the 4 year degree. 

I'm not sure it's an actual preference for four-year degrees. I think it's mainly the fact that most applicants don't have three year degrees, and the drop system (L2/B2) generally favours people who have more grades under their belt (so it might be harder for someone with only three years' worth of grades to meet the academic cutoffs, since it's more likely a lower grade won't be dropped). Note that admits with "3 year degrees" also likely encompasses people who chose to apply in the third year of a four-year degree, and there are fairly few people in that category.

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