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Blondlaw

Is 161 a good score?

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I was worried about a 161, but my friend who has gotten into law school and is now practicing told me it's a good score, and forums like these skew opinion. I decided to crunch some numbers and was surprised with my results. I161 is definitely a good score, i'll lay out my math below, any input and/or corrections would be appreciated!

Assumptions: 2000 applicants per school, each applicant applies to 4 schools , average class size = 130 students

2000 X 18 (law schools in Canada pertaining to this forum) = 36000 applications

36000 applications/ 4 (because each person applies 4 times) = 9000 applicants

161 = 83 percentile, ergo scored better than 83% of applicants ( I understand that people who score very low may not apply)

.83 x 9000 = 7470 ( your score beats this many applicants)

9000-7470= 1530 (the amount of applicants with your score or above)

130 (average class size) x 18 = 2340

Therefore, a 161  is better than 810 students admitted and definitely gives one a good shot at law school. It may not give you the pick of the litter, but it will get you in. 

 

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The main problem with this approach is that you're assuming people who scored 120-140 are going to apply and is a consistent part of that applicant pool. A 161 is in the 83rd percentile of LSAT takers for a particular test. It doesn't mean you're the 83rd percentile of the 9,000 (or so) applicants.

Not to say a 161 isn't a good score. It's just an erroneous perspective to be looking at things.

Edited by iReminisce
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For most Canadian schools. the line for competitive LSAT scores is ~160, so on a loose definition, then 161 is indeed a "good score:. At the same time, LSAT score isn't everything, and everyone has different definitions of "good".

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Yeah your math is entirely wrong for the reason @iReminisce stated. 161 is right around the median LSAT accepted for most of the big schools, so it's (definitionally) better than or equal to the score of 50% of the accepted applicants. 

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39 minutes ago, Blondlaw said:

I was worried about a 161, but my friend who has gotten into law school and is now practicing told me it's a good score, and forums like these skew opinion. I decided to crunch some numbers and was surprised with my results. I161 is definitely a good score, i'll lay out my math below, any input and/or corrections would be appreciated!

Assumptions: 2000 applicants per school, each applicant applies to 4 schools , average class size = 130 students

2000 X 18 (law schools in Canada pertaining to this forum) = 36000 applications

36000 applications/ 4 (because each person applies 4 times) = 9000 applicants

161 = 83 percentile, ergo scored better than 83% of applicants ( I understand that people who score very low may not apply)

.83 x 9000 = 7470 ( your score beats this many applicants)

9000-7470= 1530 (the amount of applicants with your score or above)

130 (average class size) x 18 = 2340

Therefore, a 161  is better than 810 students admitted and definitely gives one a good shot at law school. It may not give you the pick of the litter, but it will get you in. 

 

 

A 161 is a perfectly reasonable score based on the profile of people taking the LSAT. It's a score around most of the medians for Canadian law schools, so getting in depends on your GPA. It isn't a near auto-admit (not many people will be refused anywhere with a 180) or an auto-reject (GPA doesn't matter much for someone with 120). Plenty of people will be accepted or rejected with that, depending on other parts of their applications.

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55 minutes ago, Blondlaw said:

I was worried about a 161, but my friend who has gotten into law school and is now practicing told me it's a good score, and forums like these skew opinion. I decided to crunch some numbers and was surprised with my results. I161 is definitely a good score, i'll lay out my math below, any input and/or corrections would be appreciated!

Assumptions: 2000 applicants per school, each applicant applies to 4 schools , average class size = 130 students

2000 X 18 (law schools in Canada pertaining to this forum) = 36000 applications

36000 applications/ 4 (because each person applies 4 times) = 9000 applicants

161 = 83 percentile, ergo scored better than 83% of applicants ( I understand that people who score very low may not apply)

.83 x 9000 = 7470 ( your score beats this many applicants)

9000-7470= 1530 (the amount of applicants with your score or above)

130 (average class size) x 18 = 2340

Therefore, a 161  is better than 810 students admitted and definitely gives one a good shot at law school. It may not give you the pick of the litter, but it will get you in. 

 

I deliberately haven't read any of the posts. Just the title. Yes...161 is a good score. Period end of story. 

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