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buttercupflyaway

Is anyone else really exhausted and burnt out?

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I guess any law students reading this are going to have a good laugh. I'm still in the application stages-- spent my whole summer studying nonstop for the September LSAT, spent all of September-- October 31 working on applications, and from then until now I've spent all of my time studying for the December 2 LSAT. And I'm just exhausted.

I can't work up the motivation to take any of this seriously anymore and I'll just sit in front of the book and stare at it and think about other things.

How do I fight this? The December LSAT is two weeks away and all I feel is apathy toward it. Is anyone else going through something similar? How are you dealing with it?

Edited by buttercupflyaway
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18 minutes ago, buttercupflyaway said:

I guess any law students reading this are going to have a good laugh. I'm still in the application stages-- spent my whole summer studying nonstop for the September LSAT, spent all of September-- October 31 working on applications, and from then until now I've spent all of my time studying for the December 2 LSAT. And I'm just exhausted.

I can't work up the motivation to take any of this seriously anymore and I'll just sit in front of the book and stare at it and think about other things.

How do I fight this? The December LSAT is two weeks away and all I feel is apathy toward it. Is anyone else going through something similar? How are you dealing with it?

TAKE A BREAK, if necessary until December 2. And, give yourself permission to take a break as long as you need without guilt.

I mean you spent the whole summer prepping for the LSAT, and again a few weeks now, I think better by far to do nothing before the December LSAT and be rested and relaxed, than to push yourself to stare at the book and be stressed and burned out.

Caveat, I wrote the LSAT many, many years ago, no current experience.

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Trust me when I say that you will miss these weeks. A lot. 

Also, you probably won't make any strides with two weeks left on the LSAT if you've been studying for months straight. You'll only make it worse for yourself. The one thing that would have improve my LSAT score, in retrospect, would be not being so damn tired and burned out when I was taking it. 

Take the next two weeks off. Maybe review a couple of PTs right before the test day, just to jog your memory. You're not going to forget anything in two weeks. 

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I'm just curious. How is it possible to study for the LSAT all summer and during "all of your time?" What exactly do you study? It is not like, say, law school, where studying = reading cases, reading your class notes and making sure you understand what the cases stand for, preparing CANs, etc.  There's no actual material to learn for the LSAT.  Are you just doing hundreds of practice tests or what? I can't see a benefit to that.

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11 minutes ago, providence said:

I'm just curious. How is it possible to study for the LSAT all summer and during "all of your time?" What exactly do you study? It is not like, say, law school, where studying = reading cases, reading your class notes and making sure you understand what the cases stand for, preparing CANs, etc.  There's no actual material to learn for the LSAT.  Are you just doing hundreds of practice tests or what? I can't see a benefit to that.

People do it :rolleyes: 

Reading through books. Doing practice tests in the slowest manner possible. Trying to learn how each game and LR question is formatted and how best to diagram them and and and. 

Never understimate peoples ability to waste their own time.

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14 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

People do it :rolleyes: 

Reading through books. Doing practice tests in the slowest manner possible. Trying to learn how each game and LR question is formatted and how best to diagram them and and and. 

Never understimate peoples ability to waste their own time.

And burn themselves out.  

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27 minutes ago, providence said:

I'm just curious. How is it possible to study for the LSAT all summer and during "all of your time?" What exactly do you study? It is not like, say, law school, where studying = reading cases, reading your class notes and making sure you understand what the cases stand for, preparing CANs, etc.  There's no actual material to learn for the LSAT.  Are you just doing hundreds of practice tests or what? I can't see a benefit to that.

Presumably they mean they're using their time after work/school.

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25 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

People do it :rolleyes: 

Reading through books. Doing practice tests in the slowest manner possible. Trying to learn how each game and LR question is formatted and how best to diagram them and and and. 

Never understimate peoples ability to waste their own time.

I'll sometimes read a post by someone talking about how they diagram the vectors of the permutations of the verifiers of the logical indicators or whatever the f--- the lingo is, and while I can clearly see the answer to the question itself, if I try to understand the process they've been taught for how to get there I risk going as insane as a character in a Lovecraftian Cthulhu mythos story :blink: (side note, if in Toronto see the del Toro exhibit at the AGO, it's great).

Aside from techniques, it is definitely possible to work on skills that will improve one's LSAT score, but I would assume that after a few months the return on additional time and effort is marginal unless one has much more time and can work on reading ability generally or something (e.g. personally and anecdotally I read very quickly and had since I was in elementary school done logic puzzles for fun, so I was very well-prepared for the LSAT, but in a sense I'd spent years, decades even, improving my skills albeit without at the time having had any such purpose).

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It might be time to work on the life skills required to be a law student or lawyer - time management, the ability to prioritize tasks and the benefit/risk analysis, determination, hard work, and the ability to deal with stress. As others have mentioned, I would also take time off (perhaps, depending on your comfort level, waiting until 2018 to rewrite), but in that time, look at what you have done so far and how you could do it better. Learning how you learn/work best is crucial, in my opinion, to "having a life" and using your time effectively.  It only gets harder from here (I have been repeating two mantras to myself when struggling: "The only easy day was yesterday" (I found BUD/S videos to be incredibly inspirational before the Bar exams) and "This too shall pass"), so if you are serious about being in the profession for a long time, start adapting and figuring out how YOU get to be successful, which I define as achieving the goals you set before yourself.

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41 minutes ago, drankcoffee said:

Presumably they mean they're using their time after work/school.

Still - what are they doing with that time? What is the benefit to writing 10O practice tests? Don’t one or two give you enough of a taste for what it is like?

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7 minutes ago, providence said:

Still - what are they doing with that time? What is the benefit to writing 10O practice tests? Don’t one or two give you enough of a taste for what it is like?

I always have the same sense of bafflement that people do that as you do.  I guess not everyone is a intuitively clever as you and I, Providence. :)

 

 

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48 minutes ago, providence said:

Still - what are they doing with that time? What is the benefit to writing 10O practice tests? Don’t one or two give you enough of a taste for what it is like?

I don't know, personally I didn't improve between my first test and my last test, I got the same score. Granted, I only did like ten. But I know some people who significantly improved their score over time, so there's that. 

I think most of it stems from peer pressure, honestly. You hear and see people stressing and ranting about how much they're studying and how many tests they are doing and you end up doing the same out of paranoia or insecurity or something. If you're doing something for the first time, you don't know how much effort you have to put in to get the score you want.

It is a lot like law school, actually. Spending two weeks writing a memo that could be written in day or even a couple of hours. But people will spend that whole two weeks... for various reasons. It's the same reason why people read all of the cases in fine, nitcomb depth and refuse to skim. You get diminishing returns, but by the time you realize it, it's too late.

Eventually you learn, and you learn what is necessary to skip and where you can cut corners and where you need to channel your energy. But for the first time, it's scary and mysterious and you've never done it before, so you don't know if you're doing it the right way, and you have all of these people shouting into your ear about "the right way" to do it, and that's basically it. 

@Lamps8 - good post. 

Edited by drankcoffee
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1 hour ago, providence said:

Still - what are they doing with that time? What is the benefit to writing 10O practice tests? Don’t one or two give you enough of a taste for what it is like?

A lot of the users on TLS do this because they feel the need to get into t14. A lot of them do every practice test, usually drilled sections for older ones and full tests for the newer ones. A lot of them also will redo individual logic games multiple times with a few days break in between until they get it done in 5-6 minutes without error, to get a better sense of the general mechanics asked upon during that section.

While I think the volume some of the guys are working with is a bit unnecessary, especially for those in Canada hoping to break 160, I think the methods they use are pretty helpful.

 

Also, to the OP, I would recommend slowing down your practice as you approach the test. Unless you know it doesn't personally work for you otherwise, having free time to do whatever on the days before the test can help your nerves on testday.

Edited by MinnesotaTwins

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2 hours ago, providence said:

Still - what are they doing with that time? What is the benefit to writing 10O practice tests? Don’t one or two give you enough of a taste for what it is like?

I definitely took more than 1 or 2. After a while of doing questions, you begin to get a feel for them and can even anticipate them. At least that's how it worked for me.

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5 hours ago, providence said:

Still - what are they doing with that time? What is the benefit to writing 10O practice tests? Don’t one or two give you enough of a taste for what it is like?

I normally do not post on here; however, you have irritated me enough that I must. Now, I agree with you that people can achieve an excellent score on the LSAT without studying for months. But, put your self-loathing attitude aside and realize that the LSAT, just like any other exam, can be studied for. I know numerous people who have gotten high 170s by studying for the test through learning how to diagram logic games, learning common traps/logical flaws for logical reasoning, and diagramming reading comprehension. So, please stop thinking that just because YOU did not have to study for the LSAT, everyone else should not have to either. And to the OP, take a couple days off and start studying again, you will be better off for it.

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10 hours ago, buttercupflyaway said:

I guess any law students reading this are going to have a good laugh. I'm still in the application stages-- spent my whole summer studying nonstop for the September LSAT, spent all of September-- October 31 working on applications, and from then until now I've spent all of my time studying for the December 2 LSAT. And I'm just exhausted.

I can't work up the motivation to take any of this seriously anymore and I'll just sit in front of the book and stare at it and think about other things.

How do I fight this? The December LSAT is two weeks away and all I feel is apathy toward it. Is anyone else going through something similar? How are you dealing with it?

I feel exactly the same way! I've been working full-time and studying for the LSAT. At this point, I'm just disappointed. I know, that while I did the best I could under the circumstances, I'm not even close to my goal score.

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9 hours ago, providence said:

Still - what are they doing with that time? What is the benefit to writing 10O practice tests? Don’t one or two give you enough of a taste for what it is like?

Maybe I shouldn't have spent so much time reading LSAT advice intended for those hoping to go to T14 law schools in the States, but people have definitely increased their score drastically (150s to 170+) by taking more practice tests and studying over a prolonged period of time.

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All things in moderation my friends. You are going to burn out. 

We have had this discussion on the forum over the years and I have to say that the number of people who are devoting full time hours over weeks or even months seems to go up every year. A lot of them are posting on the TLS forum and hearing a lot of stories (some of which are undoubtedly exaggerated or outright false) about absolutely insane LSAT study schedules that they then feel they have to emulate. This is not how everyone does it, so if you are feeling peer pressure to do it, consider this your formal permission to stop. At a certain point it’s just posturing and you need to recognize that for your own mental health.

This crazy volume of hours spent prepping is only worth it if it is helpful to you. And burnout is not helpful. If you can’t turn your brain off you should step back to let yourself recover. And if you are scoring well, don’t feel like you have to finish 100 prep tests exactly before you can compete. That is not how this works. 

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1 hour ago, hopefulawyer said:

Maybe I shouldn't have spent so much time reading LSAT advice intended for those hoping to go to T14 law schools in the States, but people have definitely increased their score drastically (150s to 170+) by taking more practice tests and studying over a prolonged period of time.

Yeah, people have. It's not normal. The mean repeat test taker increases their score by 2.8 points, and the distribution is a near perfect normal distribution, so you're as likely to drop 4 points as you are to gain 7.

And sure, there's a guy or gal out there who went from 150 to 175+, but statistically, they're less than 0.05% of repeat test takers. About 20k people wrote for the second+ time in 2012, which means that a grand total of 10 people did that. 

If you're feeling lucky...

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