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Potential Vancouver Salary Bump?

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Given the recent talks about Toronto associate salary bumps, is there any chance those talks might trickle over and impact the Vancouver market? I've noticed that, unlike Toronto, there seems to be less of a consistent starting salary for associates at large Vancouver firms (ranging from $87k to $110k). Anybody have any insight whether associate salaries in Vancouver might receive a bump of its own or if we're looking at the salary to remain fairly static for the next few years?

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I don't think the Vancouver market is connected to the Toronto market. The salary discrepancies are already so large that I would think most who would move for money already have. That being said, I have noticed an uptick in the number of new job postings in Vancouver this year. That could lead to higher salaries. 

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According to NALP Stikeman's 1st year salary is 101 now (up from 98). 

Edited by Hesse

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On December 14, 2017 at 11:57 PM, Hesse said:

According to NALP Stikeman's 1st year salary is 101 now (up from 98). 

On that note...a number of Vancouver firms that had starting salaries of 94k moved up to 98k

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Posted (edited)

I've heard that firms in Vancouver are moving to 55K for articling. Can anyone confirm this? Would all major firms be going to this, or just a select few so far?

Edit: Definitely confirmed for some - Blakes website is updated to 55K.

Edited by PJFry

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2 hours ago, PJFry said:

I've heard that firms in Vancouver are moving to 55K for articling. Can anyone confirm this? Would all major firms be going to this, or just a select few so far?

Edit: Definitely confirmed for some - Blakes website is updated to 55K.

Can confirm that Blakes and 3 other large downtown firms have bumped articling salaries to $55,000. 

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Jesus, it was less than 55 before? Is that for the 10 months or per annum? 

 

Given Vancouver cost of living, you basically have to go further into debt to article - even at a big firm (slightly exaggerating for effect).

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21 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Jesus, it was less than 55 before? Is that for the 10 months or per annum? 

 

Given Vancouver cost of living, you basically have to go further into debt to article - even at a big firm (slightly exaggerating for effect).

Vancouver's salaries were a significant reason I could justify the extra tuition of Osgoode. 

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2 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

Vancouver's salaries were a significant reason I could justify the extra tuition of Osgoode. 

Associate salaries seem to be fine. I'm just confused why there's such a bigger gap between their associated and articling students than other cities' big law firms. I thought Toronto pays something like 70-80 per annum to articling students..

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4 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Associate salaries seem to be fine. I'm just confused why there's such a bigger gap between their associated and articling students than other cities' big law firms. I thought Toronto pays something like 70-80 per annum to articling students..

As part of the articling period in Vancouver, students have to do a 10 week course called PLTC before writing the bar exam. Students do not work at the firm during PLTC, but most firms will still pay their salary during this time (as well as the course tuition). Firms are basically getting 9 months of work from their students, and paying $50,000 or $55,000 for the year.

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37 minutes ago, hitman9172 said:

Can confirm that Blakes and 3 other large downtown firms have bumped articling salaries to $55,000. 

Thanks. Are you willing to state which 3 and whether you know if they are the only others so far?

Can anyone confirm if they know of large firms which have not given this bump?

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On 2018-03-21 at 2:53 PM, PJFry said:

Thanks. Are you willing to state which 3 and whether you know if they are the only others so far?

Can anyone confirm if they know of large firms which have not given this bump?

The 4 that have definitely raised articling salaries to $55,000 are Blakes, Stikeman Elliot, Fasken, and McCarthy Tetrault. Unsure of other firms.

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On 3/23/2018 at 9:41 PM, hitman9172 said:

The 4 that have definitely raised articling salaries to $55,000 are Blakes, Stikeman Elliot, Fasken, and McCarthy Tetrault. Unsure of other firms.

Can confirm DLA Piper and Norton Rose have as well.

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Most of the large firms also offer bonuses to summer students that return to article with them. These vary from $5000-$7000. Though the bonuses go towards tuition and books, I think it's still fair to consider them a part of articling students' compensation. 

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1 hour ago, Hesse said:

Most of the large firms also offer bonuses to summer students that return to article with them. These vary from $5000-$7000. Though the bonuses go towards tuition and books, I think it's still fair to consider them a part of articling students' compensation. 

You can, however you can't take the tax credit for that tuition, so it works out to a somewhat smaller bonus in the longrun. 

On the other hand, yoy get it in the summer, so it comes earlier. 

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On 4/1/2018 at 1:21 PM, Hesse said:

Most of the large firms also offer bonuses to summer students that return to article with them. These vary from $5000-$7000. Though the bonuses go towards tuition and books, I think it's still fair to consider them a part of articling students' compensation. 

That's a bonus for summer students. Students who did not summer are not given this bonus. I'd say they are distinct. on that basis.

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There’s data publically available for articling and first year salaries in Vancouver. Does anyone have any insight on what a typical salary scale for years 2 onwards look like at a large downtown Vancouver corporate firm?

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Coming out of the woodwork to give people a confirmed salary chart update for Vancouver. Essentially 6-8 of the downtown firms have done a slight bump of their comp table:

1yr) 101

2yr) 111

3yr) 121

4yr) 132

5yr) 145

6yr) 155

7yr) 170

Some others are approximately 3-5 grand below on each amount above. Also note that the later year salaries will often be negotiable and vary more than the early year ones.

Also also I missed these forums. If there is anyone interested I may do an "ama" as an early years associate solicitor in a big firm downtown vanvouver.

Ok cool bye

 

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, reasonable_person said:

Coming out of the woodwork to give people a confirmed salary chart update for Vancouver. Essentially 6-8 of the downtown firms have done a slight bump of their comp table:

1yr) 101

2yr) 111

3yr) 121

4yr) 132

5yr) 145

6yr) 155

7yr) 170

Some others are approximately 3-5 grand below on each amount above. Also note that the later year salaries will often be negotiable and vary more than the early year ones.

Also also I missed these forums. If there is anyone interested I may do an "ama" as an early years associate solicitor in a big firm downtown vanvouver.

Ok cool bye

 

I thought most Van firms started near 80,000? Does this mean they bumped compensation by ~20k?

Edited by BlockedQuebecois

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