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kurian

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I am a new immigrant, did my engineering back home.. I am planning on attending law school, I have few questions as I am new in the country and not sure how the law scene here is. To begin with:

1) to practice law, I need to have a JD ? and I have to do a bachelors ?

2) when i look at U of Ottawa,  what should be the programs I should be looking at ? what i see on the website are bachelors of commerce + JD, Bachelors of political science + JD, certificate in law ,.. 

3) I dont have a masters degree, i would ideally want to do a LLM, but that will nt let me practice law unless I hav JD...so I have to re-do my bachelors in the form of LLB + JD ?

 

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well..in these 4 years, i moved to canada and got my permanent residency a month ago and hoping this would help in a lower fee..

 

now from my post 4 years ago, i know that i need a JD to practice law in canada, i m more keen on u of Ottawa,  for its in the  capitol is my reason..so when i m looking at the programs of U of ottawa, how do students take up here ? just do the JD or bachelors in political science/ commerce or even masters of arts/MBA + JD  for those who have done their under grad already and just need a JD 

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This is what you need to apply to the law school.

 

You apply through the Ontario Law School Application System.

 

Your engineering degree will count as the bachelors required for entry most likely - you just need to meet the standards for grades and hope you can get in. You need a JD to practice law in Canada (or LLB). It does not need to be from Canada, but if it is outside Canada you have to be accredited.

 

If you want to practice law in Canada, do not look at the LLM requirements. It does not allow you to become licensed, but there are some people who have JD's from other countries that use LLM programs as equivalencies for accreditation purposes. You don't have a law degree for that yet though, so don't worry about it.

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1) to practice law, I need to have a JD ? YES and I have to do a bachelors ?

You have foreign bachelor degree already, what's your gpa in that degree.

Even though a foreign degree may be less favorable, but re-doing a bachelor degree consume a lot of  time, I might say it's better to write your lsat asap. If you score decently , you can start to file application.

2) when i look at U of Ottawa,  what should be the programs I should be looking at ? what i see on the website are bachelors of commerce + JD, Bachelors of political science + JD, certificate in law ,.. 

Any Law school will do, any JD granting institution will do. You don't have to stick around with Ottawa.

3) I dont have a masters degree, i would ideally want to do a LLM, but that will nt let me practice law unless I hav JD...so I have to re-do my bachelors in the form of LLB + JD ?

You have bachelor degree already, write your lsat asap.

Edited by akulamasusu

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Most people just do the JD.

The JD/political science and JD/commerce joint degrees are only offered in French; how good is your French? (French immersion is possible for the political science/commerce part of the joint degree but as far as I know the law degree must be done in French.)

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my French is i should say almost level 1,  very basic , and my GPA from undergrad isnt that good either, i am preparing for LSAT...

to do JD and LLB is it the same ? because when i look at the university website they dont have anything specifically LLB, just JD.. or joint programs.. 

if i am doing just a JD, wont i be getting a bachelors degree as well ? as in LLB ?

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I don't want to be mean, but this is really basic information. Really you should be able to find this yourself. It's all there on the website, or through the respective Law Societies. 

As well, if English is your second language you might also want to consider upgrading before tackling law school admissions.

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I apologize, this is very basic .. but I know nobody who went to law school here. That is the only reason. I need help in picking the right program. I thank everybody who is kind and taking time to reply to my questions.

my back ground:

i did bachelors of electronics engineering and post graduate diploma in information technology with 6+ years of work experience in information technology. With that as my back ground my English is good enough for law school, so that is nt my concern. 

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 I just check online message, e bachelors of commerce + JD,  you need to maintain gpa 3.7 of first two year of commerce, in order to enroll that program of JD later (I cannot validate it's truthfulness but I would like to believe it's probably or more likely to be true. Because law is usually competitive program, there is often no direct entrance from high school in North America  ) In other words,  you are most likely not to be in the program yet if you are admitted Bcommerce+JD . You probably do not have to write LSAT through internal application because its french immersion program but you need to maintain certain gpa of first two year of undergraduate study (close to A average) to further advance to JD program through school internal application after two year of bachelor degree.

If that's the case, why bother French immersion law school? do you want to practice in Quebec ? or do you practice in the rest of Canada. which one appeal you the most.. Unless you really like French or have strong obsession to practice in certain limited jurisdiction, such as Quebec or Ottawa or wherever.  I really think I think it's  comparatively better for you to write a LSAT and apply LOTS of English common law school in Canada. This way, you are more likely to be boundless and you do not have learn French from level 1. If you choose French immersion program, you probably be likely to study "civil law program" instead of "common law program".  These two teaching are drastically different in a sense or in a certain degree. Jurisdiction can also be different.

One study more about statues, the other study mote about "precedents" and "judgment"

Edited by akulamasusu

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apologies for the delay, i m preparing for my LSAT ,  am i too late for the sept 2018 applications ? if i give my exam in dec 2017 ?

i work 44 hrs a week, i hav to ..

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9 hours ago, kurian said:

apologies for the delay, i m preparing for my LSAT ,  am i too late for the sept 2018 applications ? if i give my exam in dec 2017 ?

i work 44 hrs a week, i hav to ..

The December 2017 LSAT will not be too late for September 2018 entry - some schools will even accept a February 2018 LSAT. You will, however, have to submit your applications by November 1, 2017, and then I believe schools will just wait for your LSAT score to come before they consider your application. Best of luck

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