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2018 2L Recruitment

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2 minutes ago, DorianGray said:

Do the following ITC: Steiber, BTZ, Polley Faith, McCague?

Someone posted here about an ITC from McCague, if I'm not mistaken. Don't recall seeing the rest/or know about whether they ITC or not.

Edited by WellsFargo

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26 minutes ago, DorianGray said:

Do the following ITC: Steiber, BTZ, Polley Faith, McCague?

ITC today at McCague

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Have Gowling, NRF, DLA sent PFOs? If they have, and you have not received that (or an ITC), is it at all worth holding out hope to hear from them? I know anecdotal stories are out there about people getting lucky on call day, but how many people do firms really keep on their waiting list? 

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3 minutes ago, DorianGray said:

Have Gowling, NRF, DLA sent PFOs? If they have, and you have not received that (or an ITC), is it at all worth holding out hope to hear from them? I know anecdotal stories are out there about people getting lucky on call day, but how many people do firms really keep on their waiting list? 

I got a surprise call from two of the three you mentioned last year so there is hope. Even if others have gotten ITCs and you haven't you may still be in the running as people reject in-firms and firms move down their lists. I don't think anyone will be able to quantify how much hope you have.. but there's hope.

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I've got a question about handling "surprise" calls -- at the moment I've got a full slate of in-firms, but there are some government offices which haven't called, and I would prefer to interview with some of them. I take it that it's poor form to accept an interview and then cancel it upon receiving a surprise call, but the alternative seems to be that I risk cutting down my options unnecessarily if I don't receive any additional calls. Does anybody have any insight? Thanks.

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So I had a handful of OCI's, but I take that I am not very good at interviews because every firm except 3 have sent me PFO's.

Pretty down on the process because a couple firms that seemed impressed with me and I had established solid rapport with both sent me PFO's the day after OCI's.

I recently got an ITC from a non-OCI firm which I guess is alright.

 

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52 minutes ago, Caff said:

I've got a question about handling "surprise" calls -- at the moment I've got a full slate of in-firms, but there are some government offices which haven't called, and I would prefer to interview with some of them. I take it that it's poor form to accept an interview and then cancel it upon receiving a surprise call, but the alternative seems to be that I risk cutting down my options unnecessarily if I don't receive any additional calls. Does anybody have any insight? Thanks.

IMO it’s fine to cancel interviews. Just give them as much notice as possible and be polite.

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41 minutes ago, Lawstudent3210 said:

So I had a handful of OCI's, but I take that I am not very good at interviews because every firm except 3 have sent me PFO's.

Pretty down on the process because a couple firms that seemed impressed with me and I had established solid rapport with both sent me PFO's the day after OCI's.

I recently got an ITC from a non-OCI firm which I guess is alright.

 

A few notes that are informed by both experience and what I had to tell myself while going through the same process:

  • not getting in-firms does not mean you're not very good at interviews, or that there's anything specifically wrong with you;
  • it's always cold comfort to say that many people don't get in-firms/offers, but it's true;
  • "many people" includes very qualified, intelligent candidates who interview well;
  • the process is oblique and the numbers are not in your favour, confirmation bias will make it seem like every single other student is doing better than you are, but that's not true;
  • even if you slip through the cracks, it's not the end of the world - sometimes you just straight up won't get what you want, but the good news is that the legal profession, like the law itself, is malleable.
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1 hour ago, Lawstudent3210 said:

So I had a handful of OCI's, but I take that I am not very good at interviews because every firm except 3 have sent me PFO's.

Pretty down on the process because a couple firms that seemed impressed with me and I had established solid rapport with both sent me PFO's the day after OCI's.

I recently got an ITC from a non-OCI firm which I guess is alright.

 

OCIs are arbitrary. if you discount the time getting in and out and for asking questions, 15 mins to make an impression on someone is difficult -  no matter who you are. Sometimes arbitrary works in your favor, other times it doesn't. Kind of like life. 

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2 hours ago, Lawstudent3210 said:

So I had a handful of OCI's, but I take that I am not very good at interviews because every firm except 3 have sent me PFO's.

Pretty down on the process because a couple firms that seemed impressed with me and I had established solid rapport with both sent me PFO's the day after OCI's.

I recently got an ITC from a non-OCI firm which I guess is alright.

I was told before I started the process that an "average" conversion rate for OCIs to in-firms is 25%.  Same for in-firms to offers.  This proved to be accurate for me and a number of my friends.

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3 hours ago, Lawstudent3210 said:

So I had a handful of OCI's, but I take that I am not very good at interviews because every firm except 3 have sent me PFO's.

Pretty down on the process because a couple firms that seemed impressed with me and I had established solid rapport with both sent me PFO's the day after OCI's.

I recently got an ITC from a non-OCI firm which I guess is alright.

 

All you need is one offer though :). Speak with students who worked at those firms and learn everything you can about the work they do there. For instance, work with certain clients (if it's public, careful here) or how involved students are. Use that information to demonstrate interest in the firm. Having more than just general knowledge goes a LONG way. Also make sure you send an e-mail to your top choice near the end of in-firm week and be explicit. "I had a great time, if you make me an offer I would gladly move forward". Best of luck!

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44 minutes ago, GreysAnatomy said:

Has anyone at Ottawa received ITCs from Gowling, Dentons, Gardiner Roberts, Norton Rose, or DLA Piper?

I got one from DLA Piper. Nothing from the others. 

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Anyone hear from McCarthy (U of Ottawa)?

I heard that someone heard from Gowlings btw.

Edited by GameOfHumour

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