Jump to content
PassingTime

School Rankings by Admission Standards?

Recommended Posts

I know law school rankings in Canada can usually be dismissed, but there's obviously a difference in admission standards between schools.

Given that, what do you think are the 'easiest' schools to get into? The most difficult?

From hardest to easiest, I think:

Top: Toronto, Osgoode, McGill, Queen's & Dalhousie

Bottom: Windsor, Thompson River, UVic... maybe New Brunswick and Manitoba?

What do you think?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A user with the first post bringing up a school ranking debate not the best look.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, kurrika said:

Why do you care?

Research. My LSAT score is not competitive enough for the top brass. So I'm looking elsewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, PassingTime said:

Research. My LSAT score is not competitive enough for the top brass. So I'm looking elsewhere.

Then asses your application and look at the schools admissions criteria and find the schools that best fit your application.

How are your grades distributed, how were your ECs, does the school weigh LSAT or GPA more.

They mostly do it differently so work within what you have, find your fit(s) and apply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Bure10 said:

Then asses your application and look at the schools admissions criteria and find the schools that best fit your application.

That's what I'm doing now - and why I'm here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, PassingTime said:

That's what I'm doing now - and why I'm here.

I think you're missing Bure's point. There isn't some sort of established spectrum of easy to hard. Each school prioritizes different aspects during admission to the point that a post like this has absolutely no value. For example, somebody with crap stats but amazing softs wouldn't be prioritized at U of A as it's predominantly a numbers based school. That previous example wouldn't be true at U of C as they're more holistic in their admissions. Perhaps it is wise to spend some time in each school's forum and as Bure mentioned to do some research on what school fit(s) your application best. You would have had a completely different response if you simply asked a general question involving what schools have historically prioritized during admissions instead of trying establish this completely subjective ranking based on "ease" of entry. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Atlas said:

I think you're missing Bure's point. There isn't some sort of established spectrum of easy to hard. Each school prioritizes different aspects during admission to the point that a post like this has absolutely no value. For example, somebody with crap stats but amazing softs wouldn't be prioritized at U of A as it's predominantly a numbers based school. That previous example wouldn't be true at U of C as they're more holistic in their admissions. Perhaps it is wise to spend some time in each school's forum and as Bure mentioned to do some research on what school fit(s) your application best. You would have had a completely different response if you simply asked a general question involving what schools have historically prioritized during admissions instead of trying establish this completely subjective ranking based on "ease" of entry. 

Thanks for the response, you're right.

What the school prioritizes is what I'm trying to ascertain with this thread. I should have given more thought to my main question.

Essentially, I am looking for schools that adopt a holistic admission model.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, PassingTime said:

Thanks for the response, you're right.

What the school prioritizes is what I'm trying to ascertain with this thread. I should have given more thought to my main question.

Essentially, I am looking for schools that adopt a holistic admission model.

Calgary, TRU, Windsor and Lakehead.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, PassingTime said:

I know law school rankings in Canada can usually be dismissed, but there's obviously a difference in admission standards between schools.

Given that, what do you think are the 'easiest' schools to get into? The most difficult?

From hardest to easiest, I think:

Top: Toronto, Osgoode, McGill, Queen's & Dalhousie

Bottom: Windsor, Thompson River, UVic... maybe New Brunswick and Manitoba?

What do you think?

 

I agree that this is all a bit silly but I don't agree with your order in terms of difficulty if you're just talking about numbers.

 

"Top": Toronto, Osgoode, McGill, UBC, UVic


They all use slightly different criteria though, as other have mentioned so it really depends on the candidate.

 

I got into UBC but probably wouldn't get into Windsor because I have basically no volunteering or social justice experience.

Edited by Starling
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Starling said:

I agree that this is all a bit silly but I don't agree with your order in terms of difficulty if you're just talking about numbers.

 

"Top": Toronto, Osgoode, McGill, UBC, UVic


They all use slightly different criteria though, as other have mentioned so it really depends on the candidate.

 

I got into UBC but probably wouldn't get into Windsor because I have basically no volunteering or social justice experience.

Yup this is really true. UBC and U of T have pretty similar numbers, but UBC is purely a numbers school (just GPA and LSAT are considered) where U of T is more holistic in their selection by awarding 1/3 of the weight in admissions to the personal statement. 

So difficulty is really relative. If you just have good stats and a blank resume you'll cruise into the index schools like UBC or Alberta. If you have have a mix of stats and ECs places like U of T, Osgoode, or McGill might wind up being relatively "easier" than UBC if your numbers don't quite meet UBCs cutoff. 

There is a really interesting YouTube video that's about two hours long by a University if Virginia law Dean about law school applications. He talks about how there is room for most candidates in law schools but that many students misapply, eg if you have a 3.3 and a 155 it doesn't make much sense to apply to UVA where you need a 3.75 and a 169. Food for thought I guess. 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, DenningsSkiTrip said:

There is a really interesting YouTube video that's about two hours long by a University if Virginia law Dean about law school applications. He talks about how there is room for most candidates in law schools but that many students misapply, eg if you have a 3.3 and a 155 it doesn't make much sense to apply to UVA where you need a 3.75 and a 169. Food for thought I guess. 

 

Maybe adopting the 'Oprah-Winfrey-Approach' to law school admissions is the reason so many graduates are having a hard time finding jobs down there.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, FunnyLawName said:

Maybe adopting the 'Oprah-Winfrey-Approach' to law school admissions is the reason so many graduates are having a hard time finding jobs down there.

You get an application! You get an application!

Everybody gets an application!!!

*audience screams*

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/14/2017 at 0:22 PM, PassingTime said:

Research. My LSAT score is not competitive enough for the top brass. So I'm looking elsewhere.

Maybe you should stop caring so much about researching which schools you might get into to and more time studying for the LSAT if you're concerned that your score is hindering your chances to get into law school.

It really bothers me when people waste their time obsessing over which schools they think they'll get into based on their stats compared to previous cycles of admissions. You're putting unnecessary stress on yourself by "researching" what schools are "easier" to get into and it's neither productive nor helpful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Plinko said:

Maybe you should stop caring so much about researching which schools you might get into to and more time studying for the LSAT if you're concerned that your score is hindering your chances to get into law school.

It really bothers me when people waste their time obsessing over which schools they think they'll get into based on their stats compared to previous cycles of admissions. You're putting unnecessary stress on yourself by "researching" what schools are "easier" to get into and it's neither productive nor helpful.

When you aren't made of money, it's not a waste of time to save the money. If you're a fringe canadian law applicant, sure, you can apply to all of them. But if you don't have the 3 grand or so, it's good to research chances and eliminate the schools you can't get into.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your original classification of schools from hardest to easiest is correct.

Don't listen to people who say things like "Well that's not accurate because Windsor/Lakehead are more holistic."
In this case, as in every case, "holistic" is just a euphemism for "has lower standards because its a worse school" - and if its not being used in that context - aka U of T - its basically the school posturing that they care about more than just grades (*cough* they really only care about grades). 

If you don't have the grades for a school, you're throwing up a hail mary. Some times hail marys get caught, sometimes they don't. Just take a reasonable look at previous years lsat/gpa medians and you'll see what schools you're competitive for. 

People love to think that their school just has a more rainbow-y, holistic approach to admissions because they got in and, after all, they're special. They don't. There's good schools and there's not so good ones. People with good grades tend to go to the good ones. That's life. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Plinko said:

Maybe you should stop caring so much about researching which schools you might get into to and more time studying for the LSAT if you're concerned that your score is hindering your chances to get into law school.

It really bothers me when people waste their time obsessing over which schools they think they'll get into based on their stats compared to previous cycles of admissions. You're putting unnecessary stress on yourself by "researching" what schools are "easier" to get into and it's neither productive nor helpful.

I agree with pzabby, I think it's important to research which schools you can/can't realistically get into before you apply. Not only do you save money by not wasting it on schools you're too far off to get into, you can avoid wasting time on apps for those schools, and better craft your materials for the schools you have a better chance at. 

As far as stress goes, applying to law school is a stressful experience no matter what, you can't avoid it it's just something you have to deal with. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, DenningsSkiTrip said:

I agree with pzabby, I think it's important to research which schools you can/can't realistically get into before you apply. Not only do you save money by not wasting it on schools you're too far off to get into, you can avoid wasting time on apps for those schools, and better craft your materials for the schools you have a better chance at. 

As far as stress goes, applying to law school is a stressful experience no matter what, you can't avoid it it's just something you have to deal with. 

If you get into law school and become a lawyer this will be true for the rest of your life - it just doesn't end. It starts with the LSAT, then law school applications, then applying for moots, or clinics or special courses that require applications, then summer student jobs, then BEING A SUMMER STUDENT (I'll never forget receiving my first small claims file and being scared sh*tless because I knew nothing and was meeting with the client), getting an articling spot, getting hired back, finding a job as a lawyer, and then doing lawyer work where you really just feel like a big liability all the time. 

Get used to it my friend - stress is the name of the game. 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2017-08-15 at 9:20 PM, BillyBishop said:

Your original classification of schools from hardest to easiest is correct.

Don't listen to people who say things like "Well that's not accurate because Windsor/Lakehead are more holistic."
In this case, as in every case, "holistic" is just a euphemism for "has lower standards because its a worse school" - and if its not being used in that context - aka U of T - its basically the school posturing that they care about more than just grades (*cough* they really only care about grades). 

If you don't have the grades for a school, you're throwing up a hail mary. Some times hail marys get caught, sometimes they don't. Just take a reasonable look at previous years lsat/gpa medians and you'll see what schools you're competitive for. 

People love to think that their school just has a more rainbow-y, holistic approach to admissions because they got in and, after all, they're special. They don't. There's good schools and there's not so good ones. People with good grades tend to go to the good ones. That's life. 

wrong

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^Completely wrong. But this is ls.ca. Some of us are incredibly insecure and need to shit on others to feel good about ourselves. Even if the feeling only lasts a couple of minutes.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • I did this a long time ago, but DOJ interviews are way different from private firm interviews. The DOJ had a very scripted interview with structured questions - they wanted to know "what would you do if..." in a bunch of situations, to which you would respond with examples of similar situations you've been in and what you did. There were also questions about substantive law and if I recall, "what is the most interesting recent SCC case you have read?" They were writing down the answers I gave so there was not as much eye contact and it was a little harder to establish rapport (but can and should still be done.) They had time for me to ask questions at the end and that was a good time to build the personal connection that the structured questions made difficult. There was also a written assignment that I had to do. 
    • I am more of an ambivert - I can be either introverted or extroverted, depending on the situation. For job interviews, I would generally be on the extroverted side of the spectrum. I also had the maximum number of interviews, and I was cautioned against it by people who thought it would be too much. This was some years ago, but from what I remember, it was unnecessary to do that many. It wasn't very exhausting for me, but I realize that the law school view of what is "hard" or "too much" or "tiring" is completely different from my experience. I had been through things in life much more intense and difficult than making small talk at a bunch of interviews and dinners, so it was fine. Some people found it hard to be "on" for so long, but that's where the extroverted tendencies help - that part was kind of fun when it wasn't terrifying or alienating. It does get complicated when you start getting into second and third interviews and dinners and so on because you can't do all of those and have to pick and choose.  So my issue wasn't so much the pace of the interviews, but just that it became apparent that there were only a few firms I had an interest in and a bunch of them where I really could not see myself working at all, but then I felt committed to keep selling myself to them having gone that far in the process. And of course you get caught up in everyone else's anxiety, so while it wasn't too demanding physically, it was emotionally - the extroverted side of you likely has lots of friends from law school going through the process and lots of 3L friends rooting for you and so my phone was constantly going off with people wanting to know how it was going, offering advice, complaining about their situation, etc.  As it turned out, I was able to predict which offers I would and wouldn't get and they lined up more or less with the firms where I had more of an interest, so there were a bunch of useless interviews where it was obvious I wasn't interested in them or them in me.  I would think 10 or 12 interviews are plenty and you should be able to narrow them down, but 20 will not be impossible, it's just silly.  I assume if you got 20, you have very good grades and an interesting resume, and if you're saying you're more of an extrovert, you're likely decent in interviews. I wouldn't think you have to worry about 20 interviews to maximize your chances of getting hired - that seems overly cautious to me. 
    • Just an FYI for whomever may be reading this, more than one account isn't allowed. If you have a reason for setting up a throwaway, it should be cleared with the mod team first. We can't be having every student who goes through the OCI process having duplicate accounts.  To the OP: you can continue this thread with the new account but for this thread only.  Once you receive answers to your questions, the second account will be suspended.
    • 1. I was referring to the difficulty of going from, say, Osgoode to a job in New York. Every year some students are hired by firms down south. (At U of T it can be as much as 10% of the class.) But these positions are highly competitive and firms are very grade selective. With respect to American law schools, conventional wisdom is that NY Big Law is the easiest market to get to. No one cares about ‘local ties’ in NY—and, more importantly, there are a ton of jobs. (The most competitive market is probably Washington, DC.) However! It’s still hard in the sense that you can quite easily go to a T14 law school and fail to secure a position.  2. It doesn’t really matter. You will have one year of work experience baked in to your student visa. Then, once you have a job, you apply for an H1-B through your prospective employer. If that doesn’t work out, you can fall back on NAFTAs TN status (knock on wood). You may be at a disadvantage with smaller firms, but the big shops hire foreign nationals all the time.
×