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Chances at Manitoba Law School?

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Hey Everyone! I've been doing more research on law schools in Canada, and I think Manitoba would be the best option for me. A little quick backstory: Went through a lot of medical issues [....] Basically, I've been through a lot. I always felt like the rug kept getting pulled under my feet. But it all made me much stronger. Also, if anyone is wondering or cares, I'm definitely at a more healthier state currently :) 

But, by looking into more law schools, I saw that Manitoba actually will drop 30 of my worst credits! I had no idea that they do this! So, I calculated my AGPA and it's 3.32/4.0 (I have no idea what the 4.5 number would be, if anyone can help me with this, I would appreciate it - I can't calculate my index score without the conversion because Manitoba uses 4.5). Yes, it's still not great..

Anyways, my question is this: What LSAT score do I need to be a good contender for this school? To be honest, Manitoba is probably the only realistic shot I have. I'm trying to stay positive, but I also want to stay realistic.

Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.

Edited by whereverjustice
minor edits at poster's request

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Manitoba use a published formula, and normally available index score.

(((LSAT-120)/60)*50) + ((GPA/4.5)*50)

Index score this year was, apparently, 75.648.

 

So you can play around with the numbers, but you will need your GPA on a 4.5 point scale. Plugging it in 'raw' (ie 3.32) gives you 36.888 for the GPA section, so you'd need a 167 to be in in the first round of admissions. Should be lower than that once you convert the GPA.

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You can try UNB. It also allow you with one year courses with drop and adjusted gpa .  I might assume you want one year of course drop ,

you cgpa is after drop 3.32 or before drop is 3.32.

if your gpa is 3.32 before drop , you gpa might have the chance of bumping up to 3.6 or 3.65 at least

4.5 number is a couple of course that is above 90% , you will get a gpa of 4.5 courses on that particular course

http://law.robsonhall.com/future-students/juris-doctor-j-d/agpa-calculation/grading-scale/

 . .... I encourage to apply  UNB , Uwindor, or UManitoba, or a bunch of new opening law school and see how those turn out to be.

 

Edited by akulamasusu

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Try not to fall under the assumption that U of M is your best shot. Robson Hall only takes into account your GPA and LSAT score. No referees, not your extra curriculars, not your back story to indicate your ability to persevere. If you have a weak GPA and LSAT score, there are other schools where you may have a better shot at admitance. U of C, for example, takes a much more holistic approach to their assessment of applicants.

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Given your past personal circumstances, you may want to research and consider applying under the "Individual Consideration" category (http://umanitoba.ca/admissions/media/law_bulletin.pdfhttp://law.robsonhall.com/future-students/juris-doctor-j-d/admission-to-first-year/individual-consideration-category/), although with a sufficiently strong LSAT score, you may not need to. This isn't a backdoor into law school but rather an opportunity for you to explain some of the circumstances around your GPA, and how that has been a barrier to what would have otherwise been a more successful undergrad experience.

Otherwise, I would echo what ElevenUnderwood said above: do some more research on other law schools' admissions criteria. 

I would also gently add that getting into law school is one thing; competing for good grades once/if you're in is another. Yes, Robson Hall has generous drops. But quite a few students at RH attend because they actually want to be in Manitoba, not because it's a last resort for them. Some of their LSAT scores and GPAs would have been competitive at common law schools throughout the country. They didn't need those drops in the first place. They will be working just as hard as you for top grades and good jobs. I am not saying that you will do better or worse than them, but just keep in mind that acceptance into law school is only one piece of the puzzle. I know that that may seem abstract right now. But consider how doing average or below average at U of M may affect your other goals.

As well, FWIW, U of M is not a realistic option for you until you have an LSAT score with which to make that determination. As well, aspiring for the 95th percentile is laudable but not realistic for most people. At least I don't think it is. Maybe you will be one of the fortunate few. I mean, you can figure out what score you or someone like you would need to be a "good contender", but that doesn't speak to whether you will get that score. I would simply suggest to study hard and write the best LSAT that you can. Consider taking additional courses in areas that you like to improve your GPA, if possible. Do some more research on common law schools that interest you. Understand their admissions criteria. Maybe you have a stronger L2/B2, and applying to L2/B2 schools would be in your best interest. Again, as ElevenUnderwood pointed out, you might have a better go of the admissions process by applying to "holistic schools" that weight your resume. Give yourself time to do these things. Then start considering which law school is realistic. Apply broadly to schools in jurisdictions in which you would like to live or could tolerate living, in addition to schools that you think are realistic. Because it might be that you get off of a waitlist into a school you would prefer to attend. Now, to be clear, I am not saying the sky is the limit. I am saying do some more research and take more steps to give yourself the best chance you can rather than sticking all your eggs in the golden LSAT score basket.

Edited by rziegler
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