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0joe

ON Paralegal

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I am a US Attorney considering doing work in CA and noticed that ON Paralegals can practice law, and even become prosecutors. There are restrictions of course but far more ability that I assumed that they could. Do you think that an ABA accredited JD would count as the educational requirements to sit the paralegal exam? I am considering living on one side of the bridge and working since I have worked with a few document review people who do the opposite living in Canada and driving to work on the US side. Its all just brainstorming, and I know that there are other factors beyond just academic,  but from a purely academic perspective, do you think that would meet the minimum educational requirements to sit the exam?

 

As for those already in Canada, since you can do so much with it, is it almost worth it (or totally worth it maybe even) just skipping the rest of schooling and doing that as an alternative?

 

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ok, just brainstorming at this point. I appreciate the feedback on it. I'll get ahold of them and see what they say. I suspect I might have to get it run through a third party since its a foreign degree, but hopefully there is some rule or precedence as an exception to it. If I remember to do so, I will post what I find out (in case some other person can benefit from it in the future) Thanks again.

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I second asking the Law Society, but if you can't just go ahead and sit the paralegal exam without getting a college diploma in Ontario, I would suggest accreditation instead. The cost isn't that much more than college tuition + LSUC fees - all in all, more bang for your buck.

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I talked to them, asked SPECIFICALLY if an ABA JD would count as the equivalent and got the following:

Hello,

The Law Society accredits paralegal education programs in Ontario, approved by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.  All paralegal applicants who apply for a paralegal licence with the Law Society must have graduated from an accredited legal services program. Graduates of accredited paralegal education programs are eligible to apply to write the Paralegal Licensing Examination that, in addition to other requirements, must be completed to qualify for a licence to practise as a paralegal in Ontario.

The list of accredited colleges providing the accredited paralegal education programs can be found on our website at this link along with other information with respect to the paralegal licensing process.

 

http://www.lsuc.on.ca/licensingprocessparalegal/

 

If an applicant has paralegal certification from another jurisdiction or professional experience, they may contact one of the accredited colleges in order to request a possible advanced status with respect to obtaining the accreditation to apply to the Paralegal licensing process.

 

Edited by 0joe

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1 hour ago, 0joe said:

I talked to them, asked SPECIFICALLY if an ABA JD would count as the equivalent and got the following:

Hello,

The Law Society accredits paralegal education programs in Ontario, approved by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.  All paralegal applicants who apply for a paralegal licence with the Law Society must have graduated from an accredited legal services program. Graduates of accredited paralegal education programs are eligible to apply to write the Paralegal Licensing Examination that, in addition to other requirements, must be completed to qualify for a licence to practise as a paralegal in Ontario.

The list of accredited colleges providing the accredited paralegal education programs can be found on our website at this link along with other information with respect to the paralegal licensing process.

 

http://www.lsuc.on.ca/licensingprocessparalegal/

 

If an applicant has paralegal certification from another jurisdiction or professional experience, they may contact one of the accredited colleges in order to request a possible advanced status with respect to obtaining the accreditation to apply to the Paralegal licensing process.

 

So you got your answer? 

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yeah, just not what I thought it would be nor in the detail I thought it would be.

At least it wasn't just a "refer to our website that you clearly already were at to contact us from", but still felt form letter ish.

But yeah, looks like it would take extra schooling, albeit maybe still worth doing.

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On 6/27/2017 at 10:56 AM, 0joe said:

yeah, just not what I thought it would be nor in the detail I thought it would be.

At least it wasn't just a "refer to our website that you clearly already were at to contact us from", but still felt form letter ish.

But yeah, looks like it would take extra schooling, albeit maybe still worth doing.

I am not sure if you are still looking into this, but I would caution you that in Ontario paralegals do not practice law, they provide legal services. Read By Law 4 of the Law Society Act, that is available on the Law Society website. This will outline the scope of practice for paralegals. 

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Paralegal prosecutors do things like traffic tickets, and those jobs are not plentiful, but ate very competitive to get. Why not try to get your licence to actually practice law if you want to come to Canada? As had been noted, paralegals are not allowed to practice law. They have a limited scope of oeg services that they are permitted to provide.

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