Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
beyonceslawyer

Chances of getting into McGill law (3.2 GPA)

Recommended Posts

Hi guys.

Beyonce's future lawyer here (by any means necessary)

I want to get into McGill and only McGill. I am OK with facing the truth so please be honest with me.

I'm applying with a 3.2 GPA, (6.5/10 CGPA from Ottawa U). I drastically improved it from 4.5 to 6.5, L2 years full of A's and a few B's, study abroad term is also all A's with one B. 

Lots of EC's in music, exchange program and a lot of women-related EC's as well (girl-power!)

Currently working on a killer personal statement

Still debating on doing the LSAT (I figured if I didn't get in this time around, I would do it next time around).

I was born and raised in Montreal and so I'm fully bilingual, so are 100% of the jobs on my CV.

I know McGill has a hollistic approach, but I also know they care about grades to a certain degree. Friend of mine who is already in the law program told me to just focus on increasing my extracurriculars and really being original/authentic with my personal statement. Any insight would help, thank you x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

You should write the LSAT.  With such a low GPA, you will likely have to score very high on the LSAT (90th percentile or so). 

See below from McGill's website. https://www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/undergraduates/admissions/faq

Should I take the LSAT?

While it is not required, it may nevertheless be advisable for many candidates to consider writing the LSAT. Admission to McGill’s Law program is highly competitive: there are roughly seven to eight times as many applicants as there are available places in the first year class. Accordingly, candidates are strongly encouraged to apply for admission to a number of faculties of law. Almost all faculties of law outside Quebec require the LSAT.

The quality of McGill’s applicant pool is exceptionally strong. Among admitted students, the average entering GPA is a 3.7 on a 4.0 scale (about an 84% average). Applicants with academic records below this average GPA or percentile are encouraged to consider writing the LSAT.

What are the cut-offs for CRC, GPA and LSAT scores?

There are no fixed cut-offs, and while the numerical aspects of the applicant's file are not decisive, students offered admission at McGill generally have outstanding academic records in addition to their other qualities. Accordingly, it is not possible to predict the probability of admissions using numerical indices.

University and Mature Categories:
Here are the statistics for the university and mature students entering the first year of the program in September 2016:

  Percentile Scale 4.0 Scale
Class average 85% 3.8
Lowest 74% 3.0
Median 84% 3.7
Highest 95% 4.0

 

  Score Percentile
Average LSAT 162 84.9
Lowest 150 45.2
Median 163 86.8
Highest 170 97.3
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They look at your cumulative GPA. 3.2 is well below average for them. Competitive cGPA for McGill law is 3.7+. You are unlikely to get in unless there is something remarkable in your personal statement that blows them away, or if you score very highly on the LSAT (easier said than done). If your goal is to be a lawyer or go to a Canadian law school, then you need to be fine with going to another school. 3.2 GPA is not competitive for any Canadian law school, though I'm guessing your last two years is higher. 

Edit: You're essentially competing with students who have high GPAs AND good ECs. McGill attracts a lot of bilingual applicants as well. 

Edited by Simbaa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the reason for your GPA being low attributable to something that is documented?

The admissions process is very GPA-focused. Its the #1 assessment criteria.

ECs and a well crafted personal statement can help but don't fall into the trap of thinking that they'll get you admitted on their own. Also, bilingualism is an admissions requirement but not something that is weighed competitively (they wont admit you if you dont meet the standard but they also wont admit you because you do meet the standard). 

What are you doing now? If you're not taking courses to raise your GPA, writing the LSAT is the only realistic option you have to help make your application competitive.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm currently working full time at a bank and doing lots of volunteer work. I have been studying for the LSAT but I was iffy about getting in. A friend of mine just got in with a 3.4, strong ECs and no LSAT. So I guess I thought I would give it a shot. Last two years are 3.5/6. Also went abroad for a year and got a recommendation letter from law professors there after scoring first class in an intro to law course. My first year and a half was crap because I thought I wanted to go to med  school and realized I didn't. Ideally interested in IP or entertainment law (very much into music/entertainment industry, artist rights & etc).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, beyonceslawyer said:

I'm currently working full time at a bank and doing lots of volunteer work. I have been studying for the LSAT but I was iffy about getting in. A friend of mine just got in with a 3.4, strong ECs and no LSAT. So I guess I thought I would give it a shot. Last two years are 3.5/6. Also went abroad for a year and got a recommendation letter from law professors there after scoring first class in an intro to law course. My first year and a half was crap because I thought I wanted to go to med  school and realized I didn't. Ideally interested in IP or entertainment law (very much into music/entertainment industry, artist rights & etc).

Obviously, the only way of acceptance is to try. I would suggest the LSAT to maximize your chances. You've heard what the others said. Your grades will likely be the feature that holds you back and that can be remedied with the LSAT.

Good luck!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

 

I have a higher cGPA, speak 4 languages, have an amazing CV and personal statement, and still got rejected this session. I am going to re-apply with the LSAT completed. I strongly suggest that, with that GPA, you do the same.

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In regards to this topic, 

What if the GPA of the undergraduate studies was 3.2 however I received my masters in clinical mental health and received an 3.9 GPA at the university? Would they put more emphasis on my masters or undergraduate GPA at Mcgill? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Penelope0108 said:

In regards to this topic, 

What if the GPA of the undergraduate studies was 3.2 however I received my masters in clinical mental health and received an 3.9 GPA at the university? Would they put more emphasis on my masters or undergraduate GPA at Mcgill? 

From McGill's website:

"Because the learning curve of legal studies is more similar to the learning curve of undergraduate studies, the emphasis in the assessment is on the applicant's undergraduate marks. However, graduate work will also be considered."

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Penelope0108 said:

In regards to this topic, 

What if the GPA of the undergraduate studies was 3.2 however I received my masters in clinical mental health and received an 3.9 GPA at the university? Would they put more emphasis on my masters or undergraduate GPA at Mcgill? 

Masters is a soft. Your undergrad GPA is what matters. Masters grades are curved to like an A-/A or something. It's just not comparable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/7/2017 at 5:07 PM, beyonceslawyer said:

Thank you. I think I will just do the LSAT to increase my competitiveness. 

Hi, I'm in the same boat. Did you end up writing your LSAT?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • As someone previously stated, it is not always easy to find a correlation between when you are put in queue to being accepted. Sometimes people go into queue in November and don't hear until April, or go into queue in January and hear back 1 week later. Keep in mind - there are other applicants and a majority are not on this forum, therefore the 'big picture' is not always being reflected. Good luck in this cycle! 
    • I respect the fact that this advice is based on your particular experience but I want to make clear to anyone who is reading this that there is enough time to diligently answer all the questions. I don't think the exam is supposed to be a massive time crunch. I had enough time to look up the answer for nearly every question on both the barrister and solicitor exam. I also had time to go back and ponder for 5-10 minutes the few questions I still wasn't sure about.  I do agree that diligently answering the questions is important for success--I completely fucked up the practice exams because I was too brief in my answers. Also: I hand-wrote both exams and was a bit anxious about it slowing me down but it turned out to be a non-issue, so I don't think people should be dissuaded from that if they are more comfortable with hand-writing.
    • Following. I did not receive any acknowledgement of funding with my acceptance letter to UBC, but I believe applications for bursaries/scholarships start in June? (someone please correct me if I'm wrong)
    • The hardest courses to get into are the January intensive ones. A lot of students just took what they could get.  But a lot more open up during the Fall term that require applications. They're fairly easy to get accepted into.  You're not going to graduate without having a chance to do the required courses. 2Ls are guaranteed to get in Con Law II, and 3Ls get reserved spots in civ pro, admin, and biz org. Not every student gets their perfect schedule but if you're quick on the trigger when course registration opens, you'll end up with at least one semester being decent. Specializations are meaningless but... What do you expect? They're just an extra line on your resume or firm bio and indicate interest. Its pretty easy to fulfil the necessary courses so it's not a huge time expense.
    • I didn't  I didn't go to U of O but I can tell you that students at many schools complain about the facilities, including U of T when I was there. I don't think that's anything unique to Ottawa. I know lots and lots of U of O grads and I don't see that they complain any more than any other school's students.  As for specializations, I've never seen that they are very beneficial to anyone. When you're being interviewed, we can see from your transcript the courses you took and if you had a particular focus area in your course selection. It doesn't need to be a specialization as the schools describe them.  Getting to take the courses you want is always going to be an imperfect experience. I don't know of any school that offers every single course in every year. I know that I had to make some changes to my plan when I was in law school because of changes to the offerings. One thing that may be more likely to cause that now is that more schools have a greater number of required courses after 1L than they did when I was in law school. I think it varies school to school as to which courses are required to be taken by all but that may be one thing you might want to explore at the schools on your list.

×
×
  • Create New...