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Giovanni

Chances of getting into the McGill Law School?

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Hi, I am a student at the University of Leeds in England. I am studying English Literature and Film Studies, currently going into my third and final year. I previously also completed a freshman year at McGill, I left to some personal issues so I generally do not include it in my CV. 

Here the system works differently in terms of GPA, as the overall degree grade depends on the second and third year, while the third year counts for 60/100 of your overall grade. So you can actually end up getting a high ''GPA'' without having good grades on your second. 

I've estimated the accumulated classification of my degree, and it will be around 2:1 by the time of graduation (around 65%) which is a 3.4 GPA. My resume is quite big.I won't release details, due to privacy concerns, but it involves a lot of volunteer work with refugees, intercultural leadership, societies and work in promoting diversity and equal rights. 

Apart from that I hold two TEFL Certificates,an online certificate with Harvard in Justice, and an online certificate in FRENCH at the human rights of refugees, offered by Amnesty International.

I speak Italian, Greek, French and English (due to my multi cultural background). I am also a Canadian citizen. 

Finally, I am planning on taking the LSAT in September.

I was wondering what are my chances of getting to the McGill Law School? Also, my predicted equivalent GPA might be 3.4 but if McGill decides to count my first year grades too, in comparison to the UK system which excludes it from its calculation, then my GPA falls to 3.3. 

 

I really wanna do Law at McGill. The reason why I left was because I had identity problems, which caused me depression and suicidal behaviour. I did not want to mess up my grades at McGill because of my depression. I eventually managed to do all the things mentioned while still recovering from depression. I currently help students with mental problems,and assist them online with their struggles. 

 

Please, can someone let me know if by the description, I have any chance of getting in? Would be super appreciated. :) xx

 

 

Edited by Giovanni

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Welcome to the forums. Just an FYI that your post contains a lot of detailed information. Not that this is a problem, but many times people eventually wish they didn't post things that would make them identifiable. So if you want to edit it, you have one hour. After that, the post stays up forever

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It's hard to say without seeing your LSAT score. But your GPA is a bit on the low side for McGIll admissions so you have a bit of an uphill battle. Unless you can score a 165+ on your LSAT the chances for admission to McGill law school are pretty slim. Can I ask why you want to do law at McGill? is it because tuition is inexpensive? Have you looked into other schools?

Edited by Mario21
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Mario21

1 minute ago, Mario21 said:

It's hard to say without seeing your LSAT score. But your GPA is a bit on the low side for McGIll admissions so you have a bit of an uphill battle. So unless you can score a 165+ on your LSAT the chances for admission to McGill law school are pretty slim. Can I ask why you want to do law at McGill? is it because tuition is inexpensive? Have you looked into other schools?

Ugh, it's my dream school basically. I love the level of intellectual curiosity, and the campus and the city. I have a lot of family that leaves there, and I can get funding for my tuition fees, due to my Quebec residency. My tuition fees are quite low as well. 

 

I didnt know that. I thought hat because of a big resume, it would really help the GPA 

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To start with a note, Leeds may weight the degree 60/40 3yrd year/2nd, but 'UK system' doesn't necessarily do that (my undergrad overall grade is 50/50 last two years). To give you an idea of how 'off' things can get, I expected my 2.1 to be worth about a 3.3, one Canadian university told me they assessed it as a 3.0 (which was somewhat devastating), another told me they took %s at face value where available (which was, obviously, excruciating as UK universities basically grade 45-75, and Canadian ones use about 60-90 to cover the same standard). Others have assessed me as at least a 3.5. My point is that your idea of your degree can vary wildly, due to a combination of: Different Canadian schools doing the international conversion differently, and different schools looking at different things, be it entire GPA, best 2 years, last 2 years, removing your worst credits wherever they appear on the transcript, etc.

 

You will need to submit transcripts from McGill to anywhere you apply (McGill themselves may access internally your marks, but they will certainly see them), as (I believe) everywhere requires all university studies sent to them.

 

As others have said, assessing chances is a lot easier with an LSAT, as even though McGill don't require it (as it's only offered in English), it's a very useful way of demonstrating academic potential/competence with a relatively low GPA

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7 minutes ago, Giovanni said:

Mario21

Ugh, it's my dream school basically. I love the level of intellectual curiosity, and the campus and the city. I have a lot of family that leaves there, and I can get funding for my tuition fees, due to my Quebec residency. My tuition fees are quite low as well. 

 

I didnt know that. I thought hat because of a big resume, it would really help the GPA 

It's worth noting that virtually every law school in the country shares the attributes you described. Canada isn't like the US where you have a heavily-tiered system with many schools being questionable institutions for learning and a few being highly-rated. 

That being said, there's nothing wrong with choosing a school that appeals to you the most and focusing on getting in there, but it might make sense to broaden your search a bit if you find your chances at McGill low. 

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Unfortunately not at McGill. There are schools who have a 'holistic' admissions process such as Osgoode or Windsor where your resume would be a larger contributing factor in the process, but I haven't heard that McGill has such an admissions process. It's understandable that you would want to study there for those reasons, might as well do your LSAT and see how it goes, you might rock it. In terms of the level of intellectual curiosity, the campus, and the city, I think you would be pleasantly surprised by what you find outside of Montreal.

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8 minutes ago, lookingaround said:

To start with a note, Leeds may weight the degree 60/40 3yrd year/2nd, but 'UK system' doesn't necessarily do that (my undergrad overall grade is 50/50 last two years). To give you an idea of how 'off' things can get, I expected my 2.1 to be worth about a 3.3, one Canadian university told me they assessed it as a 3.0 (which was somewhat devastating), another told me they took %s at face value where available (which was, obviously, excruciating as UK universities basically grade 45-75, and Canadian ones use about 60-90 to cover the same standard). Others have assessed me as at least a 3.5. My point is that your idea of your degree can vary wildly, due to a combination of: Different Canadian schools doing the international conversion differently, and different schools looking at different things, be it entire GPA, best 2 years, last 2 years, removing your worst credits wherever they appear on the transcript, etc.

 

You will need to submit transcripts from McGill to anywhere you apply (McGill themselves may access internally your marks, but they will certainly see them), as (I believe) everywhere requires all university studies sent to them.

 

As others have said, assessing chances is a lot easier with an LSAT, as even though McGill don't require it (as it's only offered in English), it's a very useful way of demonstrating academic potential/competence with a relatively low GPA

Ugh that might actually lead my application to be thrown in the garbage. my gap at mcvill was 2.7 due to some mental illness issues, I did not do that well and that was one of the main reasons why I left.

I don't know how I can remove my worst credits to be honest. My grades are really good from the second term of second year onwards and I'm planing on rocking ky third and final year. I will also study as hard as I can this summer for my LSAT's

 

I am not sure how McGill will convert my UK grades. I hope I will fall to the 3.5 you did. 

Ive read their email, and they said to me that apart from a grade they are really looking for someone who is being involved to things, and for someone who can promote diversity and intercultural inclusiveness at the university, and my career at the university in the UK is basically based on that.

I'm not sure, but I might as well return to McGill with re admission (since I'm still registered) do a year of philosophy `(which I'm really interested at) and then apply again. 

Did you apply to McGill? and did you do law at which uni in Canada?

Edited by Giovanni

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4 minutes ago, Giovanni said:

Ugh that might actually lead my application to be thrown in the garbage. my gap at mcvill was 2.7 due to some mental illness issues, I did not do that well and that was one of the main reasons why I left.

I don't know how I can remove my worst credits to be honest. My grades are really good from the second term of second year onwards and I'm planing on rocking ky third and final year. I will also study as hard as I can this summer for my LSAT's

 

I am not sure how McGill will convert my UK grades. I hope I will fall to the 3.5 you did. 

Ive read their email, and they said to me that apart from a grade they are really looking for someone who is being involved to things, and for someone who can promote diversity and intercultural inclusiveness at the university, and my career at the university in the UK is basically based on that.

I'm not sure, but I might as well return to McGill with re admission (since I'm still registered) do a year of philosophy `(which I'm really interested at) and then apply again. 

Did you apply to McGill? and did you do law at which uni in Canada?

No, I figured there was no point applying at McGill. They seem to take entire GPA into account, so they'll use your freshman year, and your first UK year, and the two last years, all of them. If you do another year at McGill, that will be added on as well.

 

I'm starting this fall, currently choosing between a couple of offers. Get a good LSAT and you should have options somewhere even if McGill isn't promising, but be aware that international grade conversions add a bit more of a crapshoot to the whole thing.

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30 minutes ago, lookingaround said:

No, I figured there was no point applying at McGill. They seem to take entire GPA into account, so they'll use your freshman year, and your first UK year, and the two last years, all of them. If you do another year at McGill, that will be added on as well.

 

I'm starting this fall, currently choosing between a couple of offers. Get a good LSAT and you should have options somewhere even if McGill isn't promising, but be aware that international grade conversions add a bit more of a crapshoot to the whole thing.

Oh whoah it doesn't look that good for me then. But what if I finish a second BA at McGill in Philosophy? cause i have it as a plan B, I can finish it in2  years (instead of pursuing a masters) but will two BAs look bad on my CV?

 

 

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46 minutes ago, Giovanni said:

Oh whoah it doesn't look that good for me then. But what if I finish a second BA at McGill in Philosophy? cause i have it as a plan B, I can finish it in2  years (instead of pursuing a masters) but will two BAs look bad on my CV?

 

 

Also, when I apply and they ask for my transcript, my UK transcript will be around 3.1-3.2 GPA because it won't include my predicted final year. Although I will provide them with the final results. but can they reject me without wanting to see if i can upgrade the gpa. 

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Generally speaking, admissions people sort applications by GPA and begin reviewing them from best to worst. From my perspective, there's no point in applying if you'll have a GPA of 3.1-3.2 when you apply and wont be able to show your better grades until the cycle is basically over. If your better grades do materialize, consider applying the year after but even then your chances don't look too good.

 

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So I shouldn't apply then ? Cause if there's no point then I should spend money on the lsat! However on their email they told they consider all years of study which means also the last one 

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There's not no point - but my suggestions would depend on what it is you want. If you want to go to law school in English-speaking Canada, I'd suggest you write the LSAT, and continue with your degree. Depending what you get on the LSAT (and you can try the free practice test on lsac.org, under timed conditions, for a diagnostic to get an idea), broad applications could give you several options. (If you want to go to law school and would consider Quebec, I don't know - try the civil law schools section of the forum).

 

If what you want is to go to McGill above all else, then the LSAT isn't a necessity, but you will need to hit third year out of the park. Yes, they'll consider the last year, but they'll also consider the first year, and the freshman year. So if you want to do law at McGill, then a stellar LSAT could help you a lot, but if you simply want to study at McGill, you might have alternatives that are more likely to get you there.

 

It rather depends on specifically what you want.

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2 hours ago, Giovanni said:

So I shouldn't apply then ? Cause if there's no point then I should spend money on the lsat! However on their email they told they consider all years of study which means also the last one 

Why not give it a shot? GPA isn't high, but it isn't super low either. It sounds like you have interesting work experience and you speak French.  If you're rejected, write the LSAT, see how you do, and consider applying again and more broadly. If LSAT is good but GPA is too low, then consider trying to up GPA.

Edited by conge

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Let me clarify in case anyone thinks I'm being unsympathetic. I meant that your chances of being admitted to McGill are low if you apply at the start of your final year. I'd recommend waiting until the year after but feel free to apply earlier if you can spare the effort and money involved in making an application.

Best of luck.

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2 hours ago, msk2012 said:

Let me clarify in case anyone thinks I'm being unsympathetic. I meant that your chances of being admitted to McGill are low if you apply at the start of your final year. I'd recommend waiting until the year after but feel free to apply earlier if you can spare the effort and money involved in making an application.

Best of luck.

Hey! You need to be unsympathetic to be honest haha, that's life! So even if it is harsh it's always good to be honest in these cases. If I don't get in, I'll go to Mcgill as a re admitted student and do a year of philosophy and then re apply, and if I dont then Ill just finish a second degree in philosophy and that's it haha. Maybe sometime in the future ill do law! 

 

But I think I'll give it a shot. My resume is huge and it involves mostly human rights activities, and they told me on the email that your resume plays an important role, as students were previously accepted with a lower GPA than expected just because of their bio and their references and their LSAT. I'll study my ** off this summer and write a good score at the LSAT and then we will see how it goes from there. 

 

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On 5/11/2017 at 7:32 PM, Mario21 said:

Unfortunately not at McGill. There are schools who have a 'holistic' admissions process such as Osgoode or Windsor where your resume would be a larger contributing factor in the process, but I haven't heard that McGill has such an admissions process. It's understandable that you would want to study there for those reasons, might as well do your LSAT and see how it goes, you might rock it. In terms of the level of intellectual curiosity, the campus, and the city, I think you would be pleasantly surprised by what you find outside of Montreal.

This is incorrect. McGill is absolutely a holistic admissions school.

Edited by crownie
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4 hours ago, crownie said:

This is incorrect. McGill is absolutely a holistic admissions school.

Not really. I mean, it sort of is. But you still need a fairly stellar incoming GPA. Or LSAT to make up for the GPA. The average incoming is still like a 3.7-3.8 on a 4.0 scale.

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