Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
adosal

Law School Application - GPA for Osgoode

Recommended Posts

I am currently in the process of completing my third year at Ryerson University. My school's grade scale is as follows: 

 

http://www.ryerson.ca/currentstudents/essr/gradescales_ugrad/

 

Unfortunately, my first two years were not the greatest. I believe my average was a B- or 2.67, perhaps marginally better but not by much. 

 

However, in my current year I have drastically improved. Last semester I achieved a 3.86 and this semester I expect it to be a 3.58. Assuming I keep up the trend in my fourth/final year and maintain a 3.6/3.7, what are my chances of getting into Osgoode with a reasonable LSAT score?

 

Do you think it would be beneficial for me to raise my CGPA by retaking first/second year courses after I graduate, and then applying?

 

Or can I bank on a 3.7 GPA in my final two, combined with a competitive LSAT score and extra-curriculars? 

 

I am trying to get an idea of what steps are necessary going forward.. Thank you

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's your cumulative so far? Also, convert your grades to the OLSAS scale so we can give you better feedback.

Based on that conversion, my 3.86 equates to a 3.78

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you consider a "reasonable" LSAT score? 

I guess a competitive figure would be 167? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is your overall GPA based on that conversion? Osgoode cares about cGPA, not L2, so if your cGPA is closer to 3 than 3.5 you're likely going to need more than a 167. And what is your idea of "competitive extra curriculars".

 

Keep in mind a 167 already means you're doing better than 95% of test takers - that's a high target many law students could hit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cGPA right now is 3.25 (OLSAS).

 

I have about 15 courses left to take, and if necessary, was thinking about taking a minor (6 courses) after my 4th year to further boost my GPA. This is because I heard that re-taking first year courses to boost GPA does not go as far as you would think.. 

 

As for work experience, I've been working at a family law firm full time for the past two years (enrolled in night classes) and I have two summers worth of volunteering at the Court of Appeal. Hoping to get more involved in school clubs/law-business association at my school in my 4th year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People get into law school all the time with GPAs around yours. I'd argue the LSAT matters more, from trends on these boards, than does one's GPA. People rarely get into law school with shitty LSATs (yes, the odd ones do, but it's rare), but frequently get in with lower GPAs. Mind you, they have great LSATs. My point is that your GPA is not a complete, absolute detriment, assuming you at least score 165+.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People get into law school all the time with GPAs around yours. I'd argue the LSAT matters more, from trends on these boards, than does one's GPA. People rarely get into law school with shitty LSATs (yes, the odd ones do, but it's rare), but frequently get in with lower GPAs. Mind you, they have great LSATs. My point is that your GPA is not a complete, absolute detriment, assuming you at least score 165+.

Thanks for this.. What's a great LSAT?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for this.. What's a great LSAT?

Like I said, I personally think you can get accepted to at least one Ontario school with a 165+, especially if your L2 is 3.7+. Ontario law schools appear to love those LSATs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cGPA right now is 3.25 (OLSAS).

 

I have about 15 courses left to take, and if necessary, was thinking about taking a minor (6 courses) after my 4th year to further boost my GPA. This is because I heard that re-taking first year courses to boost GPA does not go as far as you would think.. 

 

As for work experience, I've been working at a family law firm full time for the past two years (enrolled in night classes) and I have two summers worth of volunteering at the Court of Appeal. Hoping to get more involved in school clubs/law-business association at my school in my 4th year.

 

The fact that you have had a strong year this year and you plan on keeping it up moving into next year is a good thing. Bear in mind, though, that Osgoode very much cares about cumulative average, so the closer you can get it to a 3.7 (the median for admitted students) the better. A high LSAT to offset a sluggish first two years is recommended (something in the high 160s is probably the safest bet). In any event, a strong L2 is going to bolster your application, so keep it up.

 

Plugging in a 3.5 and 167 into my predictor gives you "moderate" chances, which isn't horrible. Best of luck!

 

ETA: That said, apply broadly. Osgoode isn't the end-all-be-all (though I focused on it because that's what you were asking about). Law school is law school, and your L2, if high enough, along with a good LSAT, will give you access to a law school in Ontario, even if it's not Osgoode.

Edited by Ryn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fact that you have had a strong year this year and you plan on keeping it up moving into next year is a good thing. Bear in mind, though, that Osgoode very much cares about cumulative average, so the closer you can get it to a 3.7 (the median for admitted students) the better. A high LSAT to offset a sluggish first two years is recommended (something in the high 160s is probably the safest bet). In any event, a strong L2 is going to bolster your application, so keep it up.

 

Plugging in a 3.5 and 167 into my predictor gives you "moderate" chances, which isn't horrible. Best of luck!

 

ETA: That said, apply broadly. Osgoode isn't the end-all-be-all (though I focused on it because that's what you were asking about). Law school is law school, and your L2, if high enough, along with a good LSAT, will give you access to a law school in Ontario, even if it's not Osgoode.

 

 

Thanks a lot Ryn. I really do appreciate the feedback I've been receiving from everyone on this site. I've been lurking for a while and I'm glad I've finally signed up.

 

Do you have any suggestions on taking additional courses to offset the first 2 years? I see two potential options:

 

1. Retaking the exact same courses (would my 1st marks be "replaced" by the new ones?)

 

2. Selecting a minor, consisting of 6 courses, and taking an extra semester after completing my 4th year to hopefully boost my cGPA 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No your new marks wouldn't replace the old ones. They're treated as just additional marks, so it really doesn't matter what courses you get those additional marks in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Retaking the exact same courses (would my 1st marks be "replaced" by the new ones?)

 

2. Selecting a minor, consisting of 6 courses, and taking an extra semester after completing my 4th year to hopefully boost my cGPA 

 

1. As pzabby mentioned, retaking the courses would not delete the old ones. Your institution may have a practice of removing retaken courses from your GPA calculation, but OLSAS and law schools will always include your original grade. If you don't particularly see the topic of the course as a strength of yours, I would not retake it because you just risk getting another poor mark. Focus on classes you can do well in.

 

2. More courses mean more grades to be included in your cGPA, so I would say go for it if you feel like it makes sense for you. Schools will not generally have a problem with extra terms tacked on to the end of your degree, so long as you don't apply for graduation until you're done with the extra courses. Taking classes after graduating will not have the desired effect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. As pzabby mentioned, retaking the courses would not delete the old ones. Your institution may have a practice of removing retaken courses from your GPA calculation, but OLSAS and law schools will always include your original grade. If you don't particularly see the topic of the course as a strength of yours, I would not retake it because you just risk getting another poor mark. Focus on classes you can do well in.

 

2. More courses mean more grades to be included in your cGPA, so I would say go for it if you feel like it makes sense for you. Schools will not generally have a problem with extra terms tacked on to the end of your degree, so long as you don't apply for graduation until you're done with the extra courses. Taking classes after graduating will not have the desired effect.

 

Ahh, that sucks.. especially considering Ryerson is actually one of the schools that do replace with your second attempt 

 

"You may choose to repeat a course for the sake of improving on an earlier unsatisfactory grade. The grade earned for the repeated course is substituted for the earlier grade in calculating your grade point average even if the newer grade is lower. We record all attempts on your transcript."

 

http://www.ryerson.ca/studentguide/academics/grades--gpa--academic-standing/

 

I guess a minor is probably my best bet if I end up having to boost my GPA at the end of the next school year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh, that sucks.. especially considering Ryerson is actually one of the schools that do replace with your second attempt 

 

"You may choose to repeat a course for the sake of improving on an earlier unsatisfactory grade. The grade earned for the repeated course is substituted for the earlier grade in calculating your grade point average even if the newer grade is lower. We record all attempts on your transcript."

 

http://www.ryerson.ca/studentguide/academics/grades--gpa--academic-standing/

 

I guess a minor is probably my best bet if I end up having to boost my GPA at the end of the next school year.

 

Re-take courses that you got A in and either get another A or improve it to A+. Find courses that do not require a lot of time. Do not bother re-taking old courses that you did bad in, you did bad in them for a reason and no one other than your school will replace the grade. Pretty much re-do courses you enjoyed that require the least amount of time! Good Luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^I would not recommend following this advice . What school would allow you to retake classes where you already have an A grade?

 

Admissions committees aren't stupid. Even if you could do that, do you honestly think that is going to impress anyone?

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the purposes of initial review, they're only checking OLSAS numbers, For second review, I doubt they'll look into 40 courses to see if 2 are the same. It worked for me! I re did an A- to A+.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...