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kitty77

What are my chance 3/3.88

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I did horribly my first year and a half of university and have improved quite a bit. I failed multiple classes and repeated some and by the end of my degree I should be a a 3.4, however I realized that GPA calculations would include all the original marks as well putting me down to a 3.0. My L2 is going to be around 3.88 and I'm just wondering whether it is possible and what are my chances? I wouldn't want to go outside of Ontario and also what kind of LSAT score do you think I would need to compensate?

Thanks!

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Can't say for sure, but if you focus on schools that look at L2/B2 (Western and I believe Queen's after they rank you based on CGPA), then you might have a chance with an LSAT score at around 165+.

Edited by dparkus
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Yeah a 3.0 cGPA is not doing you any favours. Is 3.8 your OLSAS L2? If not, use this thing to calculate it.

 

Almost immediately I'd rule out Osgoode, Toronto, and Ottawa. Queen's, Western, Windsor, and Lakehead are good options. Both Windsor and Lakehead tend to be a bit more holistic, depending on how you do on your LSAT. But note that Lakehead has a strong preference for people who have a connection to or want to stay in Northern Ontario, so it might not be a great option for you.

 

"The best LSAT you can get" is typically the advice we would give someone asking about what score they should get. The threshold for admission, though, is probably in the mid to upper 160s, given your GPA. 

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Yeah a 3.0 cGPA is not doing you any favours. Is 3.8 your OLSAS L2? If not, use this thing to calculate it.

 

Almost immediately I'd rule out Osgoode, Toronto, and Ottawa. Queen's, Western, Windsor, and Lakehead are good options. Both Windsor and Lakehead tend to be a bit more holistic, depending on how you do on your LSAT. But note that Lakehead has a strong preference for people who have a connection to or want to stay in Northern Ontario, so it might not be a great option for you.

 

"The best LSAT you can get" is typically the advice we would give someone asking about what score they should get. The threshold for admission, though, is probably in the mid to upper 160s, given your GPA. 

 

Yeah 3.88 is my OLSAS l2

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Yeah 3.88 is my OLSAS l2

 

Okay. That's a good sign and puts you in a decent position for Queen's and Western. Do well on the LSAT and you have a shot, I think.

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Realistically, we can hope all we want, but you cannot really control how well you can score in LSAT as it is such a painful beast.

 

IMHO, the bottom line really is trying to score as high as possible with as many tries as possible.

 

I will register to take all 4 LSAT tests. Practice and study like there is no tomorrow and score as high as you can in all 4 tries. You really have nothing to lose except some money and likely, having LSAT mental breakdown in the process. Nevertheless, if you have one good score, the world will totally open up for you.

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Realistically, we can hope all we want, but you cannot really control how well you can score in LSAT as it is such a painful beast.

 

IMHO, the bottom line really is trying to score as high as possible with as many tries as possible.

 

I will register to take all 4 LSAT tests. Practice and study like there is no tomorrow and score as high as you can in all 4 tries. You really have nothing to lose except some money and likely, having LSAT mental breakdown in the process. Nevertheless, if you have one good score, the world will totally open up for you.

 

This advice will be difficult to follow because:

 

1) It's a tremendous waste of money; and

 

2) You can only write the LSAT three times in a two year period. 

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This advice will be difficult to follow because:

 

1) It's a tremendous waste of money; and

 

2) You can only write the LSAT three times in a two year period. 

 

I agree. 3 times only. My fingers are too fat.

 

However, waste of money is a relative term.

 

If you are able to improve your scores just by a couple of points and succeed in your application, it is money well spent. Wait for another year or two and try again will really be a big waste of time and money.

 

If you look at the big picture, it really is a very small sum of insurance money. On exam day, you may drink too much milk and get sick, or you simply do not sleep well or too tired. Whatever the reasons, it can be either favourable or non favourable. No one will know.

 

There are post in here from students crying about making mistakes in their test (shift a questions, mark the wrong rows, etc...) and get a low score. Since they only took one test in December and have not registered for Feb, they have put themselves into a very bad situation.

 

It is really my personal opinion and not an advise hence IMHO. If it does not make sense to you, I do respect that. 

 

If it can give someone to think about the big picture and can help them avoid some pains in the future, then the message serves its purpose.

Edited by mccoy

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I agree. 3 times only. My fingers are too fat.

 

However, waste of money is a relative term.

 

If you are able to improve your scores just by a couple of points and succeed in your application, it is money well spent. Wait for another year or two and try again will really be a big waste of time and money.

 

If you look at the big picture, it really is a very small sum of insurance money. On exam day, you may drink too much milk and get sick, or you simply do not sleep well or too tired. Whatever the reasons, it can be either favourable or non favourable. No one will know.

 

There are post in here from students crying about making mistakes in their test (shift a questions, mark the wrong rows, etc...) and get a low score. Since they only took one test in December and have not registered for Feb, they have put themselves into a very bad situation.

 

It is really my personal opinion and not an advise hence IMHO. If it does not make sense to you, I do respect that. 

 

If it can give someone to think about the big picture and can help them avoid some pains in the future, then the message serves its purpose.

 

Alternatively, you go with the logical solution and study hard, write your test, see if you score high enough, evaluate what you did well and what you did poorly, then assess whether another attempt is warranted. 

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Alternatively, you go with the logical solution and study hard, write your test, see if you score high enough, evaluate what you did well and what you did poorly, then assess whether another attempt is warranted. 

 

Sure, that will work. There is always next year.

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