Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
harveyspecter993

What's the Issue with North York?

Recommended Posts

Just a heads up for anyone considering Osgoode and who's interested in criminal law in Toronto. You will be going to 2201 Finch, and you will be going 1000 Finch regularly. They are up and down the street from Keele Campus respectively. Get used to being in the area. And it's really not that bad anyway. I actually like the York campus myself. Whatever. I think this is a silly way to pick a law school anyway. Unless we're also talking about Windsor. I draw the line at living in Windsor.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a heads up for anyone considering Osgoode and who's interested in criminal law in Toronto. You will be going to 2201 Finch, and you will be going 1000 Finch regularly. They are up and down the street from Keele Campus respectively. Get used to being in the area. And it's really not that bad anyway. I actually like the York campus myself. Whatever. I think this is a silly way to pick a law school anyway. Unless we're also talking about Windsor. I draw the line at living in Windsor.

 

If I may ask, what are your concerns regarding Windsor?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I visited Osgoode Law School for a conference once, 5 years ago. It took a long time to get there from the city of Toronto. The area the law school is located in isn't...very inspiring, at least when I was there; it felt like I was in suburbs. But the law school itself was very nice. It seemed like a commuter school, not many students hanging around chatting or whatnot. For some, that might be an ideal law school experience (e.g. you just want to attend campus for the essentials and GTFO), but it contrasted with Dal, which has a small building located in the South End of Halifax where ppl tended to just hang around in the common areas.  

Edited by conge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the new subway line is going to do wonders for the school (fingers crossed that it will be functioning by the end of this year?)

 

It will be so lovely to finally be able to sit on ONE train and head all the way downtown from campus (as opposed running for a bus, sitting in traffic on said bus, getting on the train). I'm actually quite envious of the incoming students who get to benefit from this

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once again, North York (including the area where Osgoode and York U are located) is in the city of Toronto. It's not the 905. Nor do you get there "from the city of Toronto".

 

Just because the area isn't as nice as Rosedale doesn't make it any less a part of Toronto. In fact, it adds to it. For example I consider Downsview to be an integral hub of the city what with hoop dome and the larger sports complex there.

 

I won't bring this up again. But just think of what your words are essentially doing - segregating a city built on the foundation of diversity, inclusion, and immigrants by excluding a part which isn't affluent, and is largely immigrant. That ain't toronto. That's anti-toronto.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once again, North York (including the area where Osgoode and York U are located) is in the city of Toronto. It's not the 905. Nor do you get there "from the city of Toronto".

 

Just because the area isn't as nice as Rosedale doesn't make it any less a part of Toronto. In fact, it adds to it. For example I consider Downsview to be an integral hub of the city what with hoop dome and the larger sports complex there.

 

I won't bring this up again. But just think of what your words are essentially doing - segregating a city built on the foundation of diversity, inclusion, and immigrants by excluding a part which isn't affluent, and is largely immigrant. That ain't toronto. That's anti-toronto.

 

To be fair though, it is literally situated on the city limits. I mean literally. The campus is bordered by Steeles Ave to the north, which is the border between Toronto and Vaughan/York Region. So while you are technically correct (which, after all, is the best kind of correct), you can see why people have this sentiment, and it's not entirely inaccurate. The bottom line is that it is a very suburby kind of area compared to U of T's location. I don't see why that should matter all that much, but there it is. I would still urge people to allow curriculum, cost of education, and so on and so forth play more of a role in picking a school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I may ask, what are your concerns regarding Windsor?

 

No concerns regarding the school. I am trolling the city and the people who live there. Apologies.... -ish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once again, North York (including the area where Osgoode and York U are located) is in the city of Toronto. It's not the 905. Nor do you get there "from the city of Toronto".

 

Just because the area isn't as nice as Rosedale doesn't make it any less a part of Toronto. In fact, it adds to it. For example I consider Downsview to be an integral hub of the city what with hoop dome and the larger sports complex there.

 

I won't bring this up again. But just think of what your words are essentially doing - segregating a city built on the foundation of diversity, inclusion, and immigrants by excluding a part which isn't affluent, and is largely immigrant. That ain't toronto. That's anti-toronto.

 

Well, you're right: I Googled "City of Toronto" and Osgoode Law School is literally at the very northern edge of what Google maps thinks is the city of Toronto.

 

In any case, I guess what I meant was "I was staying in the urban core, and it took me a long time to get to the school, which felt like the suburbs." (Remember, I'm not from TO.)

 

I apologize if I was being anti-Toronto, anti-diversity, anti-inclusion, and anti-immigrant with my hurtful words.

Edited by conge
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once again, North York (including the area where Osgoode and York U are located) is in the city of Toronto. It's not the 905. Nor do you get there "from the city of Toronto".

 

Just because the area isn't as nice as Rosedale doesn't make it any less a part of Toronto. In fact, it adds to it. For example I consider Downsview to be an integral hub of the city what with hoop dome and the larger sports complex there.

 

I won't bring this up again. But just think of what your words are essentially doing - segregating a city built on the foundation of diversity, inclusion, and immigrants by excluding a part which isn't affluent, and is largely immigrant. That ain't toronto. That's anti-toronto.

 

There are plenty of other parts of the city of Toronto that are inarguably in Toronto and are not affluent and are largely immigrant.  Immigrants aren't exclusive to North York.  They're everywhere in Toronto.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are plenty of other parts of the city of Toronto that are inarguably in Toronto and are not affluent and are largely immigrant. Immigrants aren't exclusive to North York. They're everywhere in Toronto.

Does it have to be an exclusive quality to North York for my point to hold? It's exclusion regardless, of an area which is immigrant.

 

And I acknowledge that it may not be the posters intentions or purpose to do this. It doesn't detract from the fact that in effect, it's doing this.

 

This is my last word on the topic; say what you will.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does it have to be an exclusive quality to North York for my point to hold? It's exclusion regardless, of an area which is immigrant.

 

And I acknowledge that it may not be the posters intentions or purpose to do this. It doesn't detract from the fact that in effect, it's doing this.

 

This is my last word on the topic; say what you will.

Why do people do this thing where they make a point and then say they no longer wish to discuss it? If you're above having the discussion, or just don't want to, then don't make the comment. If you're not above it, or want to make your point, you should be prepared and accepting of a rebuttal. The whole "This is my opinion now this conversation is over" thing makes me think your opinion is either invalid or you're incapable of defending it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why do people do this thing where they make a point and then say they no longer wish to discuss it? If you're above having the discussion, or just don't want to, then don't make the comment. If you're not above it, or want to make your point, you should be prepared and accepting of a rebuttal. The whole "This is my opinion now this conversation is over" thing makes me think your opinion is either invalid or you're incapable of defending it.

Neither, really. I made my last point, and don't want to continue going back and forth over something relatively trivial on the internet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neither, really. I made my last point, and don't want to continue going back and forth over something relatively trivial on the internet.

 

Then why make the point? As I said, if you're above the debate or don't want to debate then just don't comment. Otherwise the only two things I can think of are that your stance isn't defensible or you lack the skills to defend it. 

 

I guess the other option is just a childish desire to have the last word, but I don't want to accuse anyone of that. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does it have to be an exclusive quality to North York for my point to hold? It's exclusion regardless, of an area which is immigrant.

 

And I acknowledge that it may not be the posters intentions or purpose to do this. It doesn't detract from the fact that in effect, it's doing this.

 

This is my last word on the topic; say what you will.

 

But you assume that the reason people are disliking North York is because it's an immigrant area.  They may love other immigrant areas, just not that one.  They may even (gasp!) be immigrants themselves!  I don't think any of the concerns given have much to do with immigrants.  Fact is, it is a crappy commute from Toronto proper.  People can acknowledge this without being racist.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good lord. My only point was that I thought the area around Osgoode was ugly.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • I wrote the LSAT in October 2015 and scored in the top 10%. I started studying 3 months earlier, in July 2015. I started out by writing a diagnostic exam and used the results to figure out how to focus my studies. I found I naturally did well with reading comprehension, so instead of splitting my time into thirds (1/3 for each section). For every 10 hours of studying, it was about 2.5 hours on reading comprehension, 3.5 hours on analytical reasoning, and 4 hours on logic games. I took PowerScore's live online classes, which was 10 3-hour live online classes in which the instructor worked through problem questions with you and assigned you optional homework (the course came with a book that was separate from the PowerScore bibles). Then I finished the PowerScore bibles. Then for the last 2-3 weeks before the LSAT I just did as many practice exams as I could, using the LSAT practice exam booklets that come with 10 exams each. I might have over done it, because approaching that final week my practice scores started to trend downwards. That's when I decided I was done, and that I needed to take 3-4 days before the real exam to relax and clear my head. Then I wrote the exam and got my desired score. I didn't work or take any summer courses that year so I could focus on the LSAT. My life was basically eat, exercise, study, sleep. I found that your state of mind when you write the LSAT makes a significant impact on your final score. I know people who score 10+ points below their practice test range because they psyched themselves out during the real thing. I recommend breathing exercises and meditation to cope with the anxiety/stress. The exam is about being mentally sharp, and you can't be on your A-game if your physical health isn't taken care of as well.
    • I have yet to go through the application process myself, so I am open to being wrong here. However, if I am not mistaken, yield protection is primarily an American tactic, no? I have been browsing various forums for a while and do not recall any instances of a Canadian applicant with grades and an LSAT score well above a school's median being rejected. I think the sensible (and most time-efficient) thing to do is to construct a general PS that nevertheless allows you to make note of specific things that make a school attractive to you (e.g. a particular clinic, journal or institute/centre for a specialized area of law)--what you might call a cookie cutter approach. At least that is what I have been doing, but maybe it won't work!  Since schools are simply looking for the best applicants, my guess is that they are less interested in the area you hope to work in and more so the quality of your application relative to everybody else's, in which case, you might as well just write about what it is you truly want to do irrespective of where you are applying. Whether they are completely indifferent is a different question, I think. Though, once more, I've never been on an admissions committee, so...
    • The information that helped me the most writing my personal statement is that it’s a 2-way street. You need to talk about yourself and maybe a specific event that made you develop an interest in law. However, schools want to attain a good “yield” which is the amount of offers accepted vs the amount of offers given. As part of the process, the admissions committee will read the statement and ask themselves, “how likely are they to accept an offer from us?”. This is not necessarily advice so you know what to write about, but it helped me because it made me stress less about writing a perfectly crafted letter that I hope they will like and made me focus on how I can fit in and bring value.
    • Schools do tend to have those kinds of reputations, though their reputation isn't necessarily what they're looking to see reflected in application materials. For instance, U of T has a reputation for being "corporate" but the school itself likes the idea that it is a pathway for people who want to further access to justice and lots of people emphasize their interest in the schools' legal clinic opportunities and reputable International Human Rights Program in their personal statements.  It really depends on the story you're trying to tell about yourself. In my view, "tailoring" your personal statement just means connecting your past experiences together in a narrative, expressing your plan for the future, and making the school look like the next logical step in your path. There are probably a lot of other ways to think about the personal statement, but this was how I thought about mine when I wrote it (admittedly over three years ago). If you're looking to target your personal statements to the law schools you're applying to, I would suggest thinking about concrete and practical things that each school has to offer, and how those things relate to your reasons for wanting to be a lawyer. For instance, if you know that one school has a legal clinic which does bird law and you're interested in bird law, then you'd want to point out that clinic as part of why you're applying to the school/ why the school fits into the overall narrative you're trying to put forward in your personal statement. You can do the same sort of thing with profs (i.e., if school A has Canada's top 3 scholars in bird law, you can emphasize your interest in bird law and whatever bird law-specific courses School A offers in that area). You can get information about this from schools' websites and by asking current students about what they think of their schools' programs in your areas of interest. Hope this helps! To clarify, all the above are considerations on top of whatever requirement the school sets out for the personal statements' contents and structure. Also, if you're from out of province or from the other side of the province, you should give some location-related indication of why you want to go to a particular school. If you have one.

×
×
  • Create New...