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Firm-hosted receptions for admitted students

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I know a couple of schools have these in the next month or so. Are they like a mock wine & cheese or more casual a la welcome day? The one I'm referring to doesn't have a dress code listed. Does that mean I should find myself a proper suit? It's a few weeks away, so there's time, but a little more direction would've been nice. 

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I just attended Osgoode's reception this week, and the attendees were dressed in business formal clothing. In the invitation, they indicated that the dress code was business casual, but the majority of people wore suits. The reception was still pretty casual, but comparable to a wine & cheese event.

 

Hope this helps!

A

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I know a couple of schools have these in the next month or so. Are they like a mock wine & cheese or more casual a la welcome day? The one I'm referring to doesn't have a dress code listed. Does that mean I should find myself a proper suit? It's a few weeks away, so there's time, but a little more direction would've been nice. 

You should probably find yourself a proper suit because, hey, you're going to need one eventually. 

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I just attended Osgoode's reception this week, and the attendees were dressed in business formal clothing. In the invitation, they indicated that the dress code was business casual, but the majority of people wore suits. The reception was still pretty casual, but comparable to a wine & cheese event.

 

Hope this helps!

A

 

I was there too! Hope I managed to say hello! 

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I know a couple of schools have these in the next month or so. Are they like a mock wine & cheese or more casual a la welcome day? The one I'm referring to doesn't have a dress code listed. Does that mean I should find myself a proper suit? It's a few weeks away, so there's time, but a little more direction would've been nice. 

 

I went with dress pants/button up/tie/cardigan.  There were a few students in suits but I didn't feel under-dressed at all

Edited by ChrisSquats
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You should probably find yourself a proper suit because, hey, you're going to need one eventually. 

 

I'm going to the Osgoode event in Vancouver on Tuesday, was planning on wearing dress pants, dress shirt and cashmere V neck sweater, would this be inappropriate? I've lost about 60 lbs since the last event I had to wear a suit for, so I unfortunately don't have one I can pull out of the closet. I'd rather cancel my attendance than show up and make a bad impression. 

 

(I'll be getting at least one suit for law school, just hoping to lose the last 5 lbs for my goal before then)

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Hmm, I'll see if I can make do with what I have in my closet. I am planning to get a proper suit but I was hoping to wait until my trip to Asia. 

 

Is there anything else I should be doing? Binge-reading The Economist? Stocking up on Starbucks gift cards like the cool kids? http://lawstudents.ca/forums/topic/43806-most-embarrassing-moment-student-edition/ 

Do not quote me on this, but you could probably get by with any kind of outfit as long as you wear a fedora or trilby and make a point of regularly tipping it in the direction of any observers.

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The Western ones are usually at McCarthys and Torys. You could get away with business casual but all the lawyers will be in suits. Wear a suit.

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I'm going to the Osgoode event in Vancouver on Tuesday, was planning on wearing dress pants, dress shirt and cashmere V neck sweater, would this be inappropriate? I've lost about 60 lbs since the last event I had to wear a suit for, so I unfortunately don't have one I can pull out of the closet. I'd rather cancel my attendance than show up and make a bad impression. 

 

(I'll be getting at least one suit for law school, just hoping to lose the last 5 lbs for my goal before then)

 

You will be more than fine in that.  I found the atmosphere to be very casual and welcoming.  Everyone was so excited to be there that I doubt anyone was paying attention to what others were wearing.  

 

Enjoy the night and don't be afraid to eat the food! 

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I'm going to the Osgoode event in Vancouver on Tuesday, was planning on wearing dress pants, dress shirt and cashmere V neck sweater, would this be inappropriate? I've lost about 60 lbs since the last event I had to wear a suit for, so I unfortunately don't have one I can pull out of the closet. I'd rather cancel my attendance than show up and make a bad impression. 

 

(I'll be getting at least one suit for law school, just hoping to lose the last 5 lbs for my goal before then)

That should be fine - don't worry about making a bad impression, so long as you're not spectacularly misguided - e.g. Showing up with an "I hate Jesus" t-shirt and a "Fuck Capitalism" button - no one will care or remember what you're wearing.

 

(bTW, congrats on the weight loss, that's impressive)

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Hmm, I'll see if I can make do with what I have in my closet. I am planning to get a proper suit but I was hoping to wait until my trip to Asia. 

 

Is there anything else I should be doing? Binge-reading The Economist? Stocking up on Starbucks gift cards like the cool kids? http://lawstudents.ca/forums/topic/43806-most-embarrassing-moment-student-edition/ 

Read the Globe and the Post - including the business sections. You want to be able to talk intelligently (or at least regurgitate received wisdom) about the issues of the day. No fashionable reception is complete without a discussion of real estate prices in Toronto and Vancouver, the importance of NAFTA, and the follies of the current administration in Washington.

 

If you don't do that anyhow, you should get into the habit.

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Hmm, I'll see if I can make do with what I have in my closet. I am planning to get a proper suit but I was hoping to wait until my trip to Asia. 

 

Is there anything else I should be doing? Binge-reading The Economist? Stocking up on Starbucks gift cards like the cool kids? http://lawstudents.ca/forums/topic/43806-most-embarrassing-moment-student-edition/ 

 

Update from the Osgoode event in Vancouver:

 

I'd say about half the students were wearing suits without ties, some were wearing dress shirts sans jackets, and some more were wearing dress shirts with sweaters. I wore the outfit I described above and felt appropriately dressed. All the women were wearing nice dresses (knee length) or pants and a blouse (jacket optional). 

 

The event was very casual, with lots of small discussion between students and Osgoode reps (Dean, dean of students, alumni) prior to dinner, then a four course meal with continued conversations. There was a quick speech from a partner at a large firm to introduce the dean, then a slightly longer speech by the dean to close out the meal. All of the reps were lovely and worked hard to include everyone in conversation. The dean in particular made an effort to speak to each student, sometimes one on one. I'd say there were about 20-25 students and around 10 Osgoode reps. 

 

As maximumbob mentioned, knowledge of current events is useful. I only brought 10 starbucks gift cards, so unfortunately I had to herd the attendee's into groups of three to give them the cards. I would suggest purchasing around 15 for your event. Alternatively, you can promptly send them an e-gift card immediately after getting their card. 

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I only brought 10 starbucks gift cards, so unfortunately I had to herd the attendee's into groups of three to give them the cards. I would suggest purchasing around 15 for your event. Alternatively, you can promptly send them an e-gift card immediately after getting their card. 

 

Is this something you're supposed to do?

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Is this something you're supposed to do?

 

Well. Not necessarily. I mean, you could make it Timmys. It's just there's a certain Je ne sais quoi from Starbucks. You want them to remember you, right?

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I think I'm getting too old to know when you guys are joking but no, no one expects you to be handing out gift cards. If a student did that at one of my firm's events, it would not make a good impression.

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Apologies for the doubt, was referencing the post linked above where Hegdis did that, and regretted it.

 

993 - dear god no, unless you actively want to make a similar post in years to come.

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Is this something you're supposed to do?

No god no! I was just referencing the post above!

 

Really my advice boils down to go, have a good time, be well behaved, and drink the nice wine. No gifts required :)

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Read the Globe and the Post - including the business sections. You want to be able to talk intelligently (or at least regurgitate received wisdom) about the issues of the day. No fashionable reception is complete without a discussion of real estate prices in Toronto and Vancouver, the importance of NAFTA, and the follies of the current administration in Washington.

 

Question: Is the opinion of Trump's administration generally negative? Even on Bay Street (just considering class and political orientation)? And is this topic talked about a lot? 

 

I'm not the type to go around trashing anyone's political beliefs, but I do disagree with almost everything Trump does and would probably say so if asked. In fact, on my last LSAT (taken after he descended the escalator but before he won any primaries), I had extra time during my essay section and finished my question, and kept writing out of boredom something like "I hope Trump doesn't win the elections". I was joking because at the time even the possibility was ludicrous but, well, here we are. Still, shouldn't delicate topics be better avoided altogether? If it's brought up in casual conversation, how bad would it be to express a thoughtful opinion that might go against someone else's beliefs? Honestly I'd rather not do politics discussions in general with strangers, but Trump's making himself really hard to ignore. 

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Question: Is the opinion of Trump's administration generally negative? Even on Bay Street (just considering class and political orientation)? And is this topic talked about a lot? 

 

I'm not the type to go around trashing anyone's political beliefs, but I do disagree with almost everything Trump does and would probably say so if asked. In fact, on my last LSAT (taken after he descended the escalator but before he won any primaries), I had extra time during my essay section and finished my question, and kept writing out of boredom something like "I hope Trump doesn't win the elections". I was joking because at the time even the possibility was ludicrous but, well, here we are. Still, shouldn't delicate topics be better avoided altogether? If it's brought up in casual conversation, how bad would it be to express a thoughtful opinion that might go against someone else's beliefs? Honestly I'd rather not do politics discussions in general with strangers, but Trump's making himself really hard to ignore.

 

It's old advice about not talking about religion and politics. And it's good advice.

 

That said, lawyers in general, including Bay Street lawyers, tend to be political creatures. Even if they're not politically active, they're at least politically interested. So politics is a frequent topic of discussion (and the sort of thing that you will be expected to have a view on). And the reality is, the antics of the US president are the biggest news story of the day - to have a discussion about current events without talking about him isn't possible.

 

My approach is simple: take an analytical approach to political topics. I have, as you may have noticed, a particular political,perspective, but I tone it down when I'm meeting people I don't know particularly well. Don't go on about how Stephen Harper is the devil or Justin Trudeau is a blow-dried imbecile - the former is false, and while the latter is true, there's a good chance you're talking to a member of his campaign team. Instead talk about policies, what people are saying about them, how people are responding them, what the experts say, and what the implications are. In short, talk about them as if you're a neutral observer of the shenanigans of the government of the day, It keeps your actual politics neutral - you might be playing devils advocate - and at least suggests you're moderately well informed and smart. Moreover, if you run into some partisan hack, he can enlighten you about why all the experts are wrong without awkwardness.

 

Now, there aren't a lot of Trumpites on Bay Street, but there are some, so you probably don't want to start a discussion about the golden-haired racist ourangatan occupying the White House. You might talk about the implications of "Buy American" policies or changes to NAFTA for Canada. Or the implications of deregulation and tax reform for the stock market. Or whether Trump will be able to keep the Republican senators on side.

 

In truth, Bay Street is pretty politically ecumenical - there are even a few dippers running around. No one really cares about your political view. They do worry about people who are so partisan that they can't play nice with others - if you show up with "con-servative", "fiberal" or "death to capitalism" button, that's likely to turn people off (as is the fact that your political views can be expressed in the space of a button). But, so long as people can turn-off the partisanship, no one cares about your beliefs.

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