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hellokitty123

SOS - Botched French Interview

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OOOOKay all, 

 

Here I am, in library, studying for an exam, after a pulling an all-nighter with my partner, when I get a call from McGill. 

 

I thought it was going to be "congrats u r in!!!" call. But nooooo, it is french interview and my heart sinks forever. I answered in awful franglais and basically ended with completely in English. I couldn't answer one question because I fully blanked out. Basically, it was a stuttering, incoherent, awful nightmare of an interview. 

 

How important is french test to admissions and should I basically give up on McGill now? 

 

(GPA 4.0/LSAT 165/Lots of extra-curriculars including interning at my province's law society)

 

 

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It's pretty important, but it also depends. First, you don't have to do well; you just have to pass. I had a French interview in which the cellphone reception was very very bad (I am in another country, and they called me with no notice). I answered all the questions in French, but I honestly couldn't hear 2/6 of the questions, so I couldn't pass. Later, when they admitted me, they did so with a "French condition" (meaning I have to complete certain French classes), which I can always test out when I go back to Canada. I think it just depends on how much they want you. They DO care about the French interview, but you only have to answer in English, and as long as you answer with comprehension, it's fine. Even if you do poorly on it, as long as you show some basic abilities, if they want you enough, they could always admit you with a French condition. 

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Hindsight 20/20 but you're allowed to tell them it's not a good time and ask to call back.

 

Answering in English is not necessarily a death sentence, but not understanding or being able to answer the questions (in either language) is not good.

 

That being said, you have good stats, hope for the best and that you are just stressed and did better than you think.

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It's pretty important, but it also depends. First, you don't have to do well; you just have to pass. I had a French interview in which the cellphone reception was very very bad (I am in another country, and they called me with no notice). I answered all the questions in French, but I honestly couldn't hear 2/6 of the questions, so I couldn't pass. Later, when they admitted me, they did so with a "French condition" (meaning I have to complete certain French classes), which I can always test out when I go back to Canada. I think it just depends on how much they want you. They DO care about the French interview, but you only have to answer in English, and as long as you answer with comprehension, it's fine. Even if you do poorly on it, as long as you show some basic abilities, if they want you enough, they could always admit you with a French condition. 

 

 

Hindsight 20/20 but you're allowed to tell them it's not a good time and ask to call back.

 

Answering in English is not necessarily a death sentence, but not understanding or being able to answer the questions (in either language) is not good.

 

That being said, you have good stats, hope for the best and that you are just stressed and did better than you think.

 

Thank you both for assuaging these damn nerves! I was able to answer all but one of the questions and I do think I understood them right! I asked her to repeat each question once or twice though. 

 

I'm hoping that getting a call this early on means they DO want me so fingers crossed I pass! I would be so okay with a french condition tho my french is pas bon. 

 

McGill's my top school but I already got into UofT and Osgoode so my life isn't over  :rolling:

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If it makes you feel better I just botched mine oh so badly. It was painful.

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I was rejected after botching the French interview a few years ago. However, I've heard that others have moved on despite not doing well. I wish you luck - but I think all you can do in this situation is sit and wait. 

Edited by BHC1

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