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I received a second email the next day mentioning entrance scholarships.

Would you mind sharing your GPA (after drops) and LSAT? Curious to see what stats garner scholarships :)

Edited by sunnyskies1992
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Status changed to offer! No email though. Does this mean I'm in?

Would you mind sharing your stats? 

Edited by islandperson

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Would you mind sharing your stats? 

I'm still not convinced I'm in though because I haven't received an email. But here are my stats anyways: 

 

GPA with drops: 3.98

LSAT: 161

 

EDIT: on a 4.0 scale, not sure about the whole 4.33 scale thing

Edited by parkyyy
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I'm still not convinced I'm in though because I haven't received an email. But here are my stats anyways: 

 

GPA with drops: 3.98

LSAT: 161

 

EDIT: on a 4.0 scale, not sure about the whole 4.33 scale thing

 

 

How long ago did you apply?

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Status changed to offer! No email though. Does this mean I'm in?

 

Yes, this means that you are in!!!! The official email should arrive in your inbox sometime during the next week. Congratulations on your admission!

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Called today to check on my estimated evaluation date (file was completed December 6th) and was told I should have an offer by the end of the week! Looks like there will be another round of offers going out by then.

 

GPA with drops: ~84% (from 4.0 scale)

LSAT: 168

Index: 92.46

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status changed to Conditional Offer on January 11th.

 

approximate CGPA with drops: 84.21 (i went to two schools and used the converter on this website so it's a little unclear if this is accurate - my four year degree I'm finishing now has a GPA of 4.05/4.33)

LSAT: 162

 

my personal statement touched on my strong extra currics, which include volunteering for my local courthouse, being in the last semester of a paralegal degree which includes a lot of substantive law such as contracts, torts, property and company law, and working as a legal administrative assistant for the past year and a half at a civil litigation firm in downtown Vancouver.

 

Good luck to everyone still waiting!

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JxAircraft you are an inspiration. Thank you for sharing your story.

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Hi everyone,

 

I received my offer email yesterday, January 20th, which I accepted as UBC has always been my first choice. For those for whom it is important, my stats are: 3.41/4.33 GPA without drops (this website's calculator suggests I have a UBC 78% with drops), and 172 LSAT. My index is 91.64.

 

TL; DR: I've been a long-time lurker on this website, and I made an account on this website just to say the following: Do not give up. Do not lose hope. Make a solid plan and keep going. Never stop loving yourself and never quit so long as you still want to work with the law. I had to write the LSAT 6 times before I got a yes; never be ashamed if you have to rewrite too. I hope those who are waiting get the best response possible.

I know that people who may not feel like they have a chance to get in this year also read this thread. I believe that reading a personal experience like the one I've written below would have helped me if I had read something like it in past years, because it would have meant I wasn't alone. So I wrote it for you guys. I'm not saying to do what I did; I'm saying that you're worthy of success.

 

I do not think that a low GPA necessarily reflects your intellect or ability to be a lawyer (or anything else). I got PTSD in undergrad and had to deal with it all the way past graduation, none of which I could prove as I had no corresponding paperwork (and so I did not apply through the discretionary categories of law schools). I believe I could have had a better GPA if I had not experienced PTSD, but I will never know for sure. I (naively) graduated as soon as I could, and thus I could not change my GPA in the years since. I have tried to get into law school every year since I first wrote the LSAT in 2012. I bombed the first LSAT with a cool 159. I wrote every opportunity I had since that first 2012 LSAT. I had volunteered heavily (hundreds of hours) and worked various (albeit casual) jobs throughout the years, and even mentioned PTSD when I first wrote personal statements, but I soon bitterly realised that in the "regular" category it didn't matter because I did not have the grades. It's not necessarily the school's fault; it's how law admissions work in this day and age, for better or for worse. As I studied and re-studied for the LSAT year after year in and around the law building of my ideal school, I'd overhear the same thing on the bus and in common areas: "I didn't really care about going to law school, I just applied to see what would happen. The LSAT was easy; I don't even remember what I got. I got As in school, obviously. You have to have an A average in order to get in, otherwise there is no hope." I am sure that most people at UBC are great; I intend to love my law school and the people in it. But these kinds of things are what I heard the loudest and most often. They never knew that someone wanting so desperately to go to law school was sitting nearby as they nonchalantly said they basically took a spot in law school that they didn't care about while I was dying trying to get one, because things that were killing me were "easy" to them. I knew the conversations were not meant for me, but I felt like I must be worthlessly unintelligent to not be able to do what these people said was easy for them. Of course that's not what that means, and it is NOT true for you either. I eventually started listening to the radio at full volume on the bus and studying in a silent study area in a different building and eating in the stairwell nearby in order to get away from overhearing these kinds of people. If you, reader, also can't seem to escape hearing this talk, you should also attempt to change your surroundings and never for a second believe what you overhear.

 

**People who have been accepted: DO NOT be like those people I kept overhearing. Have empathy and be mindful of what you say. You never know the impact of your words.**

 

As I got rejection letter after rejection letter, people began to tell me that there was no point in still trying. My family needed me to stay relatively local. I studied for so long that I started to prep well into the 170s and even got a bunch of 180s on my PTs, but the overwhelming anxiety and apparent importance of the actual exams resulted in scores like 165, 168, 167 on game day. Not enough for me to even get on the waitlist most years. I didn't want to do anything else but law as a career. I began to feel hopeless and like a failure. Eventually I had to choose life and self-love, which I did mercilessly. Over these years, purely in an effort to get over this anxiety and get into law school, I began exercising, eating better, dealing with my insomnia, making peace with and forgiving/letting go of my past, going to acupuncture to help deal with it all, and cutting off toxic friendships. I am still processing the fact that my persistence and genuine desire to practice law paid off. I hope everyone who wants to get into law school, UBC or another, gets in if that is good for you. I hope that you, reader, feel confident and happy as you move forward with your goals. But if you feel like applying to those low tier American law schools who relentlessly spam you about their admission fee waivers is your only option, do not lose hope. Ask yourself how much you want it, why you want it, and what it will mean for your future if you get it. Understand what being a lawyer actually entails. Make a plan that keeps you going and keeps you healthy, and then continue. Be empathetic to the people around you. If you are lucky enough to have a resource of help available to you, be it a friend or family member or a professional, take it.

 

Most all, never stop loving yourself. You are worthy.

Extremely inspiring post, thanks for sharing. I was getting impatient with UBC+Osgoode prior to reading this but your story really gave me some perspective.

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Hi everyone,

 

I received my offer email yesterday, January 20th, which I accepted as UBC has always been my first choice. For those for whom it is important, my stats are: 3.41/4.33 GPA without drops (this website's calculator suggests I have a UBC 78% with drops), and 172 LSAT. My index is 91.64.

 

TL; DR: I've been a long-time lurker on this website, and I made an account on this website just to say the following: Do not give up. Do not lose hope. Make a solid plan and keep going. Never stop loving yourself and never quit so long as you still want to work with the law. I had to write the LSAT 6 times before I got a yes; never be ashamed if you have to rewrite too. I hope those who are waiting get the best response possible.

I know that people who may not feel like they have a chance to get in this year also read this thread. I believe that reading a personal experience like the one I've written below would have helped me if I had read something like it in past years, because it would have meant I wasn't alone. So I wrote it for you guys. I'm not saying to do what I did; I'm saying that you're worthy of success.

 

I do not think that a low GPA necessarily reflects your intellect or ability to be a lawyer (or anything else). I got PTSD in undergrad and had to deal with it all the way past graduation, none of which I could prove as I had no corresponding paperwork (and so I did not apply through the discretionary categories of law schools). I believe I could have had a better GPA if I had not experienced PTSD, but I will never know for sure. I (naively) graduated as soon as I could, and thus I could not change my GPA in the years since. I have tried to get into law school every year since I first wrote the LSAT in 2012. I bombed the first LSAT with a cool 159. I wrote every opportunity I had since that first 2012 LSAT. I had volunteered heavily (hundreds of hours) and worked various (albeit casual) jobs throughout the years, and even mentioned PTSD when I first wrote personal statements, but I soon bitterly realised that in the "regular" category it didn't matter because I did not have the grades. It's not necessarily the school's fault; it's how law admissions work in this day and age, for better or for worse. As I studied and re-studied for the LSAT year after year in and around the law building of my ideal school, I'd overhear the same thing on the bus and in common areas: "I didn't really care about going to law school, I just applied to see what would happen. The LSAT was easy; I don't even remember what I got. I got As in school, obviously. You have to have an A average in order to get in, otherwise there is no hope." I am sure that most people at UBC are great; I intend to love my law school and the people in it. But these kinds of things are what I heard the loudest and most often. They never knew that someone wanting so desperately to go to law school was sitting nearby as they nonchalantly said they basically took a spot in law school that they didn't care about while I was dying trying to get one, because things that were killing me were "easy" to them. I knew the conversations were not meant for me, but I felt like I must be worthlessly unintelligent to not be able to do what these people said was easy for them. Of course that's not what that means, and it is NOT true for you either. I eventually started listening to the radio at full volume on the bus and studying in a silent study area in a different building and eating in the stairwell nearby in order to get away from overhearing these kinds of people. If you, reader, also can't seem to escape hearing this talk, you should also attempt to change your surroundings and never for a second believe what you overhear.

 

**People who have been accepted: DO NOT be like those people I kept overhearing. Have empathy and be mindful of what you say. You never know the impact of your words.**

 

As I got rejection letter after rejection letter, people began to tell me that there was no point in still trying. My family needed me to stay relatively local. I studied for so long that I started to prep well into the 170s and even got a bunch of 180s on my PTs, but the overwhelming anxiety and apparent importance of the actual exams resulted in scores like 165, 168, 167 on game day. Not enough for me to even get on the waitlist most years. I didn't want to do anything else but law as a career. I began to feel hopeless and like a failure. Eventually I had to choose life and self-love, which I did mercilessly. Over these years, purely in an effort to get over this anxiety and get into law school, I began exercising, eating better, dealing with my insomnia, making peace with and forgiving/letting go of my past, going to acupuncture to help deal with it all, and cutting off toxic friendships. I am still processing the fact that my persistence and genuine desire to practice law paid off. I hope everyone who wants to get into law school, UBC or another, gets in if that is good for you. I hope that you, reader, feel confident and happy as you move forward with your goals. But if you feel like applying to those low tier American law schools who relentlessly spam you about their admission fee waivers is your only option, do not lose hope. Ask yourself how much you want it, why you want it, and what it will mean for your future if you get it. Understand what being a lawyer actually entails. Make a plan that keeps you going and keeps you healthy, and then continue. Be empathetic to the people around you. If you are lucky enough to have a resource of help available to you, be it a friend or family member or a professional, take it.

 

Most all, never stop loving yourself. You are worthy.

Congratulations! You are an inspiration for us all!
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Hey Folks! I am a returning student coming back to finish the courses I did not finish in my first year. While playing with the law school's hockey team, I suffered a severe concussion in 2014-15 year, and stayed through the year. My recovery took almost a whole year and it was not until last fall that I stopped having post-concussion syndrome. I have had multiple concussions in my life from hockey at sports, and just some bad luck; the more concussions you have the longer it takes to recover.  Needless to say, I don't play hockey any more and no longer suffer from any symptoms, but I am taking care of my health as much as possible and excited for my chance to come back this fall. I have been working for my mother's First Nation in Saskatchewan as their community planner and governance officer (my background is in political studies at the U of S). Surprisingly, in my job I have had to use what knowledge that I do have of the law to help in our self-government process in drafting our own legislation like our Citizenship Act, Election Act, and our draft of our Constitution. Matrimonial Real Property is also part of our Lands Department's jurisdiction, so this has helped me stay somewhat sharp. I have still kept all of my books and articles which I still continue to read, so I hope the next 7-8 months can really do me some good. In every year there are always so many smart people, and I am sure this one will be no different. I have had to be very patient over the years wanting to pursue a legal education. My late father was a prominent lawyer in Saskatchewan, and it has been something I have been pursuing for about 7 years now. I chose UBC because of the Indigenous Legal Studies Program, and also for the chance to get experience away from home in another province and Indigenous Nations' territory. I hope to be able to make a lot of friends and meet you all in August! Also don't be afraid to message me if you have any questions about anything. I went through first year once already so I know what the year will be like. Cheers.

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I have a 92.5 index, but my grades are pulling up my LSAT (91 GPA and 160 LSAT). I saw that 92 is 'auto-admit' but will this distribution hurt my chances?

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