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Associate Hiring Process

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I was recently informed that my firm is not hiring anyone this year, so I find myself on the job hunt. Looking for opinions here:

 

-Since I won't be called to the bar until June, should I mention this in the cover letter or can I include it in the CV?

-I was given an excellent letter of reference. Should I include it without being asked, or simply say it's available upon request?

-Should I send out resumes to firms that aren't advertising, or just go through employment agencies? 

-Is this a time when firms are hiring or does activity generally pick up later in the fall?

 

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A couple of thoughts.

 

Absolutely tell people.you expect to be called in June. You do and its relevant.

 

If it really is a stellar letter of reference, absolutely include it. Someone might glance at it when reading your cover letter, but wouldn't be bothered to ask for it.

 

There's no real downside to applying broadly, and recruiters (a) don't work for you, (b) are probably being bombarded with resumes, and © cover only a fraction of the job market. Don't rely on them.

 

Hiring generally does pick until in the fall and early winter. But there are firma looking for people now. Again, there's little downside to reaching out to them.

,

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I stand by the above advice, but am on vacation and a few rum punches in, so take everythng I say for the next week with a pinch of salt.

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Don' worry Bob, I have been doing that this whole time.

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What, taking everything I say with a grain of salt or imbibing rum punches? I suppose, either way, it's not a bad policy.

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-I was given an excellent letter of reference. Should I include it without being asked, or simply say it's available upon request?

 

 

Does your excellent reference know anyone / are they able to get you in touch with anyone who may be hiring in your area?   Work the network.

Edited by kurrika

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Many small firms hire associates now. I wouldn't wait even a second to start getting out there. You should be cold calling everyone you could even remotely be interested in working for.

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Agreed with Bob.

 

1. Include that you will be called in your CV for sure. This lets potential employers know you are ready to start pretty soon. 

2. Yes, include the letter of reference because it might help you get your foot in the door.

3. Yes, send out resumes to any and all firms you are interested in. Just look on the website and either email the general info line or a specific parter. This is how I have obtained 2 out of 3 of my law related jobs. Often, firms are just quietly looking until the right person comes along - if you don't contact them, you might never hear about it. And if not, they'll at least save your materials for the future when they are looking. Most employment agencies don't have junior positions, so it's almost a waste to even go through them.

4. You may be able to have success with a small firm. Large firms likely aren't hiring, but smaller firms will know their budgets. In addition, many firms that don't necessarily hire articling students like to poach those students once they're done articling - this is your shot.

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    • Alright.... let's all take a breath and stop the dogpile I can see coming. If anyone has anything constructive left to say please do. OP, you asked for advice and you're getting it. Take what you want and leave the rest but don't throw matches unless you want a flame war.
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