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Current TRU law student answering questions.

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Hi everyone,

 

I am a current TRU law student who just finished second year.

I was kind of bored finishing my last paper of the semester and cruised back over here. I figured I would offer to answer and questions people might have about the school, admission, the faculty, job prospects, or anything. So post here and I will do my best to help out.

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Hey ,

 

 

Since very little information exists (if any at all) about the entrance stats of this year or previous years , I was wondering if you as a student had any idea as to what those admission stats might look like?

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Hey ,

 

 

Since very little information exists (if any at all) about the entrance stats of this year or previous years , I was wondering if you as a student had any idea as to what those admission stats might look like?

No idea. If they ever are actually released then we will all be aware of them together I assume.

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What is it like living in Kamloops? I am still hoping to get into my home province (Alberta), but BC has such an appeal in terms of their weather. However, I know Kamloops is a smaller city, so I was wondering what it's like for weather, activities, ect.

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Also! What is your schedule typically like in terms of classes? How often/much would you say you study a week? Do you have a part time job? Would you recommend it?

Is the school gym a good gym in your opinion?

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What is it like living in Kamloops? I am still hoping to get into my home province (Alberta), but BC has such an appeal in terms of their weather. However, I know Kamloops is a smaller city, so I was wondering what it's like for weather, activities, ect.

 

I know I didn't start this thread, but I'm happy to offer my opinion if it helps. It's been about 30 degrees all week here in Kamloops so that's definitely a plus in comparison to the typical AB spring weather. Plus my experience with Edmonton winters involved chipping layers of ice from my car after some freezing rain whereas the past winter in Kamloops had little snow and more often than not, it melted after a few days each time it did snow. There's also a ton of stuff to do around here in the summer and winter. Hiking, skiing, golf, etc. etc. pretty much all the things you can find within or near any major city. And there's artsy stuff too like theatres and museums.

 

In regards to your second post above, this year's 1L schedule was...easy? It's Monday to Friday - classes start as early as 8:30 and go as late as 5:30pm. There are two sections though and they have different schedules so there is a variation on start time and breaks but it's basically like an office job schedule. However, depending on the availability of 1L profs, this could be different for the next class.

 

Also, the school doesn't technically have its own gym. The city-run Tournament Capital Centre is on campus and has good facilities including an indoor and outdoor track, a pool, fitness centre, etc. The pool can be used by students for free. However, they do have to pay the student rate (currently $28/month or $9 for drop in) to use the indoor track and/or fitness centre. 

 

Anyway, good luck on your applications and I hope this info helps!

Edited by MissJE

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I know I didn't start this thread, but I'm happy to offer my opinion if it helps. It's been about 30 degrees all week here in Kamloops so that's definitely a plus in comparison to the typical AB spring weather. Plus my experience with Edmonton winters involved chipping layers of ice from my car after some freezing rain whereas the past winter in Kamloops had little snow and more often than not, it melted after a few days each time it did snow. There's also a ton of stuff to do around here in the summer and winter. Hiking, skiing, golf, etc. etc. pretty much all the things you can find within or near any major city. And there's artsy stuff too like theatres and museums.

 

In regards to your second post above, this year's 1L schedule was...easy? It's Monday to Friday - classes start as early as 8:30 and go as late as 5:30pm. There are two sections though and they have different schedules so there is a variation on start time and breaks but it's basically like an office job schedule. However, depending on the availability of 1L profs, this could be different for the next class.

 

Also, the school doesn't technically have its own gym. The city-run Tournament Capital Centre is on campus and has good facilities including an indoor and outdoor track, a pool, fitness centre, etc. The pool can be used by students for free. However, they do have to pay the student rate (currently $28/month or $9 for drop in) to use the indoor track and/or fitness centre. 

 

Anyway, good luck on your applications and I hope this info helps!

The only things I would add is that 1l is not too tough, but it is the hardest year by far. First years have 7 classes and 6 exams. Upper years usually do not take more than 5, and often have a paper class (you need to do at least one). For me personally this semester I had 4 exams and a paper and I also never had 5 days a week of classes. If you are going to put lots of work in one year, do it in your first year!

 

Also I really like the TCC. But if you want to save the monthly fee. The school gym offers some free workout classes for students, and you can use the pool for free. However if you do any weightlifting it is basically your main option. Although I hear the Y downtown is pretty good and cheap 

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Regarding job prospects: is it difficult competing with students from the other BC schools, or is this just an overblown concern by people claiming school prestige is important in Canada?

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Hello, 

 

I would love to know what the roundabout cost is for tuition and books for each year.  I've heard that tuition for one year at TRU is over $18,000, which boggles my mind because UBC and UVic are only $11,000 and I think $9,000, respectively (just for tuition, mind).  Clarification on that would be fantastic!  

 

Thank you!

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Regarding job prospects: is it difficult competing with students from the other BC schools, or is this just an overblown concern by people claiming school prestige is important in Canada?

 

No. If you do well and are not socially awkward you will do fine. TRU is establishing a great reputation in Vancouver from what I hear. The last two graduating classes had stellar articling placement numbers. I'm sure this year's graduating class will be the same.

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Hello,

 

I would love to know what the roundabout cost is for tuition and books for each year. I've heard that tuition for one year at TRU is over $18,000, which boggles my mind because UBC and UVic are only $11,000 and I think $9,000, respectively (just for tuition, mind). Clarification on that would be fantastic!

 

Thank you!

http://www.tru.ca/law/prospective-students/faq.html

 

If you look under the accepted tab it includes info on tuition. One of the reasons for the difference on tuition is the fact that TRU law does not currently receive government subsidies. Hope this helps!

Edited by MissJE
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Can you give some advice on where to live, and how to connect with roommates (either in law or young professionals?) 

 

Thank you! 

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Can you give some advice on where to live, and how to connect with roommates (either in law or young professionals?) 

 

Thank you! 

 

This forum, and the class of 2019 Facebook group are probably the most common ways to connect with potential roommates in law. There are also craigslist and kijiji pages for Kamloops if you may be interested in a non-student roomie. I have included the link for the FB group below though. As far as places to live goes, I may not be the best advisor since I live on the dreaded North Shore and love where I am :)

 

Lower Sahali is close to school and popular with students. Aberdeen is a very nice area that's also popular with students, but a bit farther from school. There are lots of students living downtown too. Best to keep in mind that Kamloops is fairly small though so nothing is really that far from campus. However, I would suggest using google maps to check out how close a potential apartment/house is from campus just to get an idea of the commute (based on your preferred mode of transport of course).

 

Hope this helps! :)

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/216188255417185/

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Can you give some advice on where to live, and how to connect with roommates (either in law or young professionals?) 

 

Thank you! 

 

I lived in res for my first year and downtown for the other two.  As JE said, it really depends on your mode of transportation.  I didn't have a car when I was in law school so I relied on public transit.  I found downtown very convenient for that because there was a bus stop a block from my house with 3 different buses going to TRU so I never even had to check a schedule of bus times.  Living downtown was obviously convenient for nights out as well.

 

There are a lot of great areas in Kamloops though and if you have a car you can go just about anywhere and the drive won't be bad.  

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At this point I have a practical question.

 

Does TRU actually have functional legal volunteering opportunities?

I saw on the website that TRU has a legal information centre, which I think just gives out information (ala an in-person Google) but I'm not so sure if one learns all that much from doing it.

I also heard that they are planning on starting a legal clinic next year but information is pretty scarce. Does anyone know anything about this?

Also I lived in Kamloops for a long time, and I think that this is going to come up a few times.

 

What is it like living in Kamloops? I am still hoping to get into my home province (Alberta), but BC has such an appeal in terms of their weather. However, I know Kamloops is a smaller city, so I was wondering what it's like for weather, activities, ect.

 

 

It's a stretch to call Kamloops a city at all. If you like to do big city stuff (go to trendy restaurants, flashy concerts, etc.) than you are going to be disappointed. It does have a bit of a music and arts scene but Vancouver it is not.
However, if you like to do outdoors stuff, I think it's pretty great (two ski hills nearby, hiking and biking in town, fishing nearby etc.) You don't even really need a car to access a lot of outdoors stuff.

The climate is one of the most mellow in Canada, at least during the school year (Summers are really hot). Winter is really cloudy, but often above freezing and with very little precipitation.

Also, traffic is pretty much a non-factor. At least in comparison to Edmonton where I live now, Kamloops traffic never amounts to much.

Finally... this last bit is really straying into extreme personal opinion territory.

In comparison to a lot of the places I've lived in, I think Kamloops is pretty down to earth. It's a really blue-collar town with a lot of mines and mills, and I think it shows in the people who live there. There is way less focus on trendy things than some of the other places I've lived, I think it makes people a little friendlier, but I guess that probably depends on what scene your into. If you really like indie rock and vegan restaurants (for ex.), than there are municipalities you'll like more I think. 

Edited by AntelopeofZeus

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At this point I have a practical question.

 

Does TRU actually have functional legal volunteering opportunities?

 

I saw on the website that TRU has a legal information centre, which I think just gives out information (ala an in-person Google) but I'm not so sure if one learns all that much from doing it.

I also heard that they are planning on starting a legal clinic next year but information is pretty scarce. Does anyone know anything about this?

 

I may not be the best person to answer this, but I am going to try. Even the students get confused over the operation of the legal clinics so I will try to explain how they work to the best of my knowledge and hope that someone more experienced comes along to fill in any gaps.

 

There are actually two legal advice clinics and two legal information clinics.

 

The Public Legal Information Project (http://www.tru.ca/law/current-students/Community_Outreach/Public_Legal_Information_Project.html) is a student-run "club" that operates out of the Centre for Seniors Information (CSI). It is a group of students who can provide information in the form of pamphlets or website addresses for people who have questions like, "I am a tenant and what are my rights?" NO advice is given, only information. All years are currently permitted to participate.

 

The Community Legal Clinic (CLC) (http://www.tru.ca/law/current-students/Community_Outreach/Legal_Clinic.html) is also run out of the CSI and the students are permitted to give advice under the supervision of a lawyer so they answer questions like, "I am a tenant and I want to sue my landlord for such and such, what do I need to do?" I am unsure how they currently determine which students are permitted to participate, but it is only for 2Ls and 3Ls.

 

The on-campus clinics are run by Professor Ruby Dhand (http://www.tru.ca/law/faculty-staff/faculty/dhand.html) and she is in charge of the information services and the legal clinic program. In order to apply to be a part of this, you must be enrolled in, or have completed the Community Lawyering course (which, to my understanding is offered to 2Ls and 3Ls in the winter semester each year). Unfortunately, this information is not yet readily available online and I am not sure how they determine which 2L and 3L students are accepted for participation.

 

The information I have included above is what I have gathered in my conversations with the organizers of the Public Legal Information Project and a supervising professor of the CLC. These clinics are all fairly new so I would assume that there will be more information available as they go along. I know there was also a discussion about possibly including students who have already participated in these clinics in the orientation week seminars to give more up-to-date/accurate info to incoming 1Ls.

 

 

I hope this helps at least a little! :)

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Hello, 

 

I was wondering what happens after you've received the acceptance letter and made the $500 deposit.  Do they send you a package providing more information about TRU and the JD program, your schedule, textbooks, etc.?  Or does that information show up on the mytru.ca website at some point and you just have to check every so often?  Approximately when can I expect to receive that information?

 

As well, is there an orientation week, and if so, what week does it usually take place?

 

Thanks for any insight and clarification!

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Hello, 

 

I was wondering what happens after you've received the acceptance letter and made the $500 deposit.  Do they send you a package providing more information about TRU and the JD program, your schedule, textbooks, etc.?  Or does that information show up on the mytru.ca website at some point and you just have to check every so often?  Approximately when can I expect to receive that information?

 

As well, is there an orientation week, and if so, what week does it usually take place?

 

Thanks for any insight and clarification!

 

You probably won't hear much from the school until later in the summer. You should get a package in the mail with a bit more info on the law school, your schedule (which will likely change 20 times before you actually start so don't get too attached to the first one :) ), orientation, etc. Last year I think they sent these in mid august. If you have your TRU ID, it's a good idea to forward your TRU mail to your personal email as you may get updates throughout the summer.

 

Orientation week generally starts the Tuesday after Labour Day so this year it's expected to start on the 6th of September. There are formal activities organized by the faculty and also informal ones organized by members of the Student Legal Society and other student volunteers. Last year, the informal activities started on the Sunday before Labour Day.

 

During orientation week, you usually attend one short session per course to meet your profs and get a quick run down on what to expect. They should let you know at that time what texts are really required and whether old editions will be acceptable. This is why it may be a good idea to hold off on buying texts until that week so you know what you'll for sure be needing, and plenty of upper years will be posting theirs for sale that week too.

 

In the meantime, anyone who has been accepted should join the facebook group as much of the updates on activities will be posted there. There will likely also be meet-ups in major cities later in the summer and those will be posted on the facebook group also. These are great to attend as there will be upper years there mingling and of course your new classmates as well.

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/216188255417185/

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I was wondering if it is true that the full tuition ($18000) has to be paid before the semester begins?

 

Ali

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I was wondering if it is true that the full tuition ($18000) has to be paid before the semester begins?

 

Ali

 

 

Unless you've been told this directly from the faculty, this is not true. Tuition has always been paid per semester in the past so I don't see why they would change that now. Also, if you're waiting on student loans you can ignore the deadline for payment just like in undergrad. You won't lose your spot if you wait for loans to pay because the school knows majority of students have loans. However, you won't be able to get your student card activated until you pay your tuition meaning you don't have a bus pass or cheaper rates at the gym until then.

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