Jump to content
Bike Tester

Went to uOttawa law, graduated, and got an articling position, AMA

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, FunnyLawName said:

 

What is a 'true social justice focus' to you?

Law school is law school - it has as much of a social justice focus as you want it to if you steer your courses and experiences that way. Some schools now may go a little light on certain indigenous issues compared to others, or have specific course offerings that others don't. But really, in the grand scheme of things that doesn't really matter.

UOttawa certainly advertises it more as a focus. I'm reluctant to say that actually translates to substantive focus on specific 'social justice-y' types of topics. You can participate in clinics, intensive programs, get research positions - all which relate to 'social justice'. But... literally every law school has that.

Honestly, I have seen the school focus too much on 'social justice' to the detriment of its student body, if that makes sense. For example, kicking out a student who was charged with sexual assault (for which he was acquitted before school started for him), and convicted of simple assault for which he was given a discharge - all to placate a very vocal minority of students (and practicing lawyers inappropriately stirring up crap on the student facebook groups for some reason) who didn't want a student with a criminal history associated with the school.

But listen, the point is this: if you want to go to a law school which has the same values as you, then go for it. UOttawa, and Windsor for that matter, seem to align with you that way. You're likely to find people in your cohort with the same mentality. But don't be mistaken in thinking that focus on these issues necessarily means its the best place to learn the skills necessary to take those values in to the practice of law. You can get those skills at any law school in Canada, provided you put the work in yourself. Going to Western or Queens, for example, isn't going to make you a better or worse lawyer who focuses on social justice issues just because of the institution. 

For the record, I did go to UOttawa. I thought it was great, despite talking shit about it.

 

Thank you for your insight. I don’t know enough about the situation you referred to about the student being kicked out, so not going to comment on that. 
 

A focus on social justice, to me, means walking the talk, a school which is actually shaping future agents of political and social change who will disrupt oppressive systems and institutions, advocate for marginalized populations and aid in the creation of more just policies and legislation. 
 

That being said, I totally understand that you can pursue a career in public interest or social justice law graduating from any institution. I also know that social justice is a buzzword used by institutions to attract young people who lean more to the left, and I don’t want to go to a school where I was sold a narrative that doesn’t actually ring true in the student body/faculty/courses offered. However, the consensus does seem to be that it’s what you make of your education,  not where you study, that influences the work you will do. Again, thank you for your insight! 

Edited by Toby1994
Grammar and trimming
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a civil engineer by training (undergrad and Masters) and will be a 1L in common law this fall. I decided to do law school so I could practice construction law and am wondering if anyone knows which of the three small groups would be most suitable for this goal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, notdoctor said:

I am a civil engineer by training (undergrad and Masters) and will be a 1L in common law this fall. I decided to do law school so I could practice construction law and am wondering if anyone knows which of the three small groups would be most suitable for this goal.

I don’t think Ottawa has a construction law class. There is an upper year municipal law course that could be relevant. 

In any event, nothing you do in 1L will affect that goal, other than your grades. Choose the schedule and professors you like the most. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, easttowest said:

I don’t think Ottawa has a construction law class. There is an upper year municipal law course that could be relevant. 

In any event, nothing you do in 1L will affect that goal, other than your grades. Choose the schedule and professors you like the most. 

There is a construction law class offered in the French common law section.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got admitted into the English JD section, but I was wondering if I would be able to take some courses in the french JD section? Obviously the first year courses are set for us, but I was thinking more along the lines of upper year courses. I did some post secondary education in french so I'm not to worried about issues of language proficiency and I figure that doing this would 'prove' to employers that I'm bilingual and help set me apart in the job hunt. 

Also how much interaction can those of us in the English JD section expect to have with students in the French JD/civil law sections? Can we join the same clubs/student associations as each other or does every group just do their own thing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/15/2020 at 12:28 PM, LawSchoolJock said:

I got admitted into the English JD section, but I was wondering if I would be able to take some courses in the french JD section? Obviously the first year courses are set for us, but I was thinking more along the lines of upper year courses. I did some post secondary education in french so I'm not to worried about issues of language proficiency and I figure that doing this would 'prove' to employers that I'm bilingual and help set me apart in the job hunt. 

Also how much interaction can those of us in the English JD section expect to have with students in the French JD/civil law sections? Can we join the same clubs/student associations as each other or does every group just do their own thing?

You will be able to take upper year courses in French if you choose, and some courses are bilingual where the professor alternates the language used during lectures depending on the day. For example, the Monday lecture will be in French and the Wednesday lecture in English. Generally, the professor will post materials in both French and English for these courses so you can make notes in whichever language you prefer. Bilingual courses also have bilingual exams. 

As a note, you are allowed to hand in any assignment in either official language and complete exams in either language. But, bilingual courses will provide exams with questions in both languages, whereas an English course will only provide english questions (to which you can answer in French if you choose).  

Most, if not all clubs and associations are open to all JD students (French or English) so you surely meet some of your French JD classmates in extracurriculars. Some associations may have civil law students, but that will be more rare as they generally have their own associations/clubs. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any advice for someone studying (law) in Toronto looking to summer/article/practice out in Ottawa? I've heard it's hard to crack the Ottawa market without a connection to the city. There are various reasons for wanting to make the move, and fear of not landing a position in Toronto is NOT one of them.  I'm enticed by the lower cost of living, lower population, and the fact that I have friends out there. Would it suffice to convey these reasons in cover letters?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • Hi everyone, I was wondering whether the reason for my low cGPA might help my chance for admissions . I did okay in my first year (about a B/B+ average), but in second year my grades dropped dramatically. I was clearly in the wrong major (we declare our major in year 2 at my school), so in my third year I switched into something else and I decided to do a 5th year to boost my grades. My 3rd, 4th, and 5th years will all have A averages. Nonetheless, my cGPA will only be about a 3.3 (with my L2 at about 3.85). I am wondering if my reason for such a low cGPA (and my recognition that I was simply in the wrong major) will help admissions committees be more understanding of my cgpa. Or will it not really matter? Kind of a vague question I know, but any input would be greatly helpful. Thanks!
    • Is it possible to get accommodations for the LSAT? I feel like this is very much something they should work with, because it sounds like you are a completely compétent student despite your injury, and a standardized test should not hold you back.    That or apply to McGill, where your grades are good and they don’t need an LSAT (I think)
    • For UBC you could get a better gauge of your chances if you converted your GPA into % form. There's an index calculator that's stickied on the UBC forum - as far as I know it does a pretty good job at predicting your chances. Overall your stats are great. It's definitely worth applying there.
    • they recommended a Nov write, however they take Jan write as latest write. On their site: LSAT scores for the past 5 years may be used. To apply to enter the program in 2021, it is strongly recommended that the LSAT is written by November 2020. The LSAT must be written in January 2021 at the latest. https://www.ryerson.ca/law/admissions/application-requirements/

×
×
  • Create New...