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On 2018-04-24 at 5:55 PM, Student2 said:

Does anyone know if there are small groups similar to what Western does where the same 15-20 are in all the same classes together? 

Everyone is split into one of three sections of <60 people. Your section is split further into three small groups of around 16-18 in one of either crim, torts, or contracts. So yeah, technically you'd have all your classes with those same 15-17 people in your small group (plus, depending on your class, the other 2/3 of your section).

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Currently trying to decide between University of Calgary and Dal.. coming from Toronto and hope to work back here in the future. Any advice/opinions are welcome in terms of school, lifestyle, difference in living accommodations etc. are welcome! Thanks!

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On 2018-06-19 at 8:20 PM, psigm said:

Currently trying to decide between University of Calgary and Dal.. coming from Toronto and hope to work back here in the future. Any advice/opinions are welcome in terms of school, lifestyle, difference in living accommodations etc. are welcome! Thanks!

3L here. Dal punches above its weight in terms of Toronto recruitment. The Ultra Vires stats show that Dal students consistently land about as many jobs as the entire "Other" category, of which U of C would be a part. 

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On 6/19/2018 at 10:20 PM, psigm said:

Currently trying to decide between University of Calgary and Dal.. coming from Toronto and hope to work back here in the future. Any advice/opinions are welcome in terms of school, lifestyle, difference in living accommodations etc. are welcome! Thanks!

Dal does very well for an outside of the province school. Much better than Calgary. 

You are always better off going to school in Ontario if you want to live in Toronto though.

 

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On ‎6‎/‎19‎/‎2018 at 8:20 PM, psigm said:

Currently trying to decide between University of Calgary and Dal.. coming from Toronto and hope to work back here in the future. Any advice/opinions are welcome in terms of school, lifestyle, difference in living accommodations etc. are welcome! Thanks!

I spoke to a partner at a major firm in TO last week, he told me their recruitment goes in tiers like this:

1. U of T

2. Dal, Western, Queen's, McGill, Osgoode, Windsor

3. Everyone else. Told me you have to be in the top 5-10% of your class at a U of C or U of A, etc. to get a sniff

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Does anyone have any experience/knowledge of Peter Green Hall apartments?  Odd there doesn't seem to be anything on here.  

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3 hours ago, smalltownscholar said:

Does anyone know if most students use Mac for taking notes/exams?

It's mandatory to have a laptop that you can use for exams. For class, everyone brings their laptop (most people use Macs, but PCs are common). Not everyone takes notes off of that computer during class (maybe 2-4% of people take handwritten notes).

 

 

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32 minutes ago, LegalArmada said:

It's mandatory to have a laptop that you can use for exams. For class, everyone brings their laptop (most people use Macs, but PCs are common). Not everyone takes notes off of that computer during class (maybe 2-4% of people take handwritten notes).

 

 

This is perfect. I use a massive HP right now and knew I needed a better, more functional one due to the exams. I didn’t want to buy Mac if another type was better or required and I didn’t know! Thanks!

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On 8/17/2018 at 8:45 AM, anonymousposter said:

I spoke to a partner at a major firm in TO last week, he told me their recruitment goes in tiers like this:

1. U of T

2. Dal, Western, Queen's, McGill, Osgoode, Windsor

3. Everyone else. Told me you have to be in the top 5-10% of your class at a U of C or U of A, etc. to get a sniff

Is there much variance within tier 2? I'd imagine the Osgoode name may hold a bit more weight than Windsor. What about UBC? Given how selective admission is, do TO firms simply bundle them with TRU, Lakehead, UNB, etc?  

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48 minutes ago, SufficientCondition said:

Is there much variance within tier 2? I'd imagine the Osgoode name may hold a bit more weight than Windsor. What about UBC? Given how selective admission is, do TO firms simply bundle them with TRU, Lakehead, UNB, etc?  

I refuse to believe that Major Bay street firms consider Windsor and Osgoode to be in the same echelon. All of the objective evidence I have seen seen suggests otherwise, for example the ultra vires annual report on articling placement. Although maybe just refuse to believe that I am paying $30k/year tuition for nothing. 

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4 hours ago, SufficientCondition said:

Is there much variance within tier 2? I'd imagine the Osgoode name may hold a bit more weight than Windsor. What about UBC? Given how selective admission is, do TO firms simply bundle them with TRU, Lakehead, UNB, etc?  

Hey! Forgot to include UBC and he said Windsor but I also doubted it. Basically the big 6 schools > everyone else. 

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Not Ottawa? Not that I put much stock in Canadian rankings in the first place, but this seems especially dubious, even as far as those go.

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On 8/17/2018 at 11:45 AM, anonymousposter said:

I spoke to a partner at a major firm in TO last week, he told me their recruitment goes in tiers like this:

1. U of T

2. Dal, Western, Queen's, McGill, Osgoode, Windsor

3. Everyone else. Told me you have to be in the top 5-10% of your class at a U of C or U of A, etc. to get a sniff

I say this with all possible respect to his partnership status and the majorness of his firm: those tiers are stupid and he sounds like a doof. So there. Take that, partner at a major firm and give it “a sniff.”

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2 hours ago, realpseudonym said:

I say this with all possible respect to his partnership status and the majorness of his firm: those tiers are stupid and he sounds like a doof. So there. Take that, partner at a major firm and give it “a sniff.”

If you were to place schools into tiers for Bay St hiring, how would it look? 

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7 hours ago, SufficientCondition said:

If you were to place schools into tiers for Bay St hiring, how would it look? 

It wouldn’t look like anything — I wouldn’t bother placing schools into tiers for Bay Street hiring. Tiers are bad, especially for admissions candidates for these reasons. 

Most large Toronto firms hire from most Canadian law schools. Check their websites: all of them have alumni from schools across Canada, including Windsor, Ottawa, Dalhousie, Osgoode, U of C.

To the extent that some schools are better represented on Bay St, that is a function of several factors  , of which school tier (I.e., largely prestige or reputation) is only one. Geographical advantage plays a big role — networking, interviewing, doing clinics, being present at the local bar (I mean the legal bar, not the pub, although those two are kinda interchangeable), all help with hiring, and are all easier if you’re at Toronto, Osgoode, Queens, Western, etc. That’s a big reason people tell you on this forum to study where you want to practice. When I left Dal for Toronto, I left the fledgling reputation that I’d built up with local lawyers behind and that is a setback for both hiring and practice. 

Another factor is candidate quality. Ultimately, the firms are hiring people, not schools. Sure, U of T candidates do the best. But that’s partly because U of T has some of the toughest entrance requirements. The presumption is therefore that those students have high aptitude — that if they did well at U of T, they would’ve done well at other schools too (maybe better, since elsewhere, they would be placed on a weaker curve). The fact that some schools are doing better in Bay Street hiring isn’t necessarily caused by attendance at those schools. Rather, it results in part from a perception that the candidates are stronger, and that perception results only partially from your alma mater. It also comes from grades and other metrics.

Third is self-selection. Sure, UNB, Lakehead, U of A etc place pretty poorly at large Toronto firms. But that has a lot to do with the fact that people applying and accepting at those schools aren’t planning to practice in downtown Toronto. They’re planning to practice in Edmonston, Lethbridge, St. John’s, Sault St Marie. If you go to a school without much of a formal recruit from downtown Toronto firms, the ultra numbers aren’t  necessarily reflective of firms’ unwillingness to hire you. They reflect the fact that you chose to go a school where these firms don’t have a presence or history. The same goes with a school like Dal. Do we have good representation on Bay? Sure. But that’s because a reasonable number of people attend Dal, knowing they might want to work there, not because all partners think that Dal is amazing and U of A produces borderline illiterate malpractice machines.

Basically, I think that you should all choose schools that make sense for you, taking into account cost, location, personal preference, etc. If your goal is to work as close to the TD Towers as humanly possible and buy lunch salads in the PATH, your choice should include an assessment of how to best get there. But hiring is more complicated than one school is in this tier and other schools are another tier.

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