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Imanuwell

Is it possible to pursue dual careers in law and acting?

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Hi everyone,

 

Thank you for visiting my thread. I want to share my career plan with you today in hopes of receiving constructive feedback that will aid me in making an informed career choice.

 

My goal is build dual careers in law and acting. When I tell people this, there's often a misconception that acting is my passion while law is merely a safety net. This is not the case. I've wanted to be a lawyer since I was a kid, and throughout my educational journey I've demonstrated strengths in related skills (i.e. writing, critical thinking, verbal communication, negotiating, etc.). I've had great experiences in high school and university law classes, and have done exceptionally well in them, I've met and spoken with a few lawyers, and I've read dozens of negative articles regarding law practice. After doing all this, I am still convinced that law is for me. What solidifies this view is the fact that when I think of law, I don't think about the money or the title. I think about the work. Odd as it may be, the socially-isolated 60-hour work-week is kind of appealing to me, so long as I get to apply my "gifts" as I describe them, to challenging and meaningful work. As for my love for acting, it is something I discovered after being invited to give it a try by a local acting coach. I've fallen in love with it and this year alone I've made good industry connections and landed my first television role not too long ago. In short, I don't want to give up any of these pursuits right now. I love art, but I also love academia and the professional-world and I don't want to limit myself ahead of time, so here is my plan and my problem:

 

The time demands of both law and acting make it virtually impossible to do both full time. A rare exception would be having summers or half the year off as a lawyer and working as an actor during that off time. I wouldn't know how to start making that an actionable goal, so given this, I am willing to settle with having to choose one, but only by gaining time-demanding success in both, not by limiting myself ahead of time.

 

Here is my plan:

 

1. Spend 4 years completing my undergrad degree while going through PAIN - an acronym I've come up with to describe the journey of building an acting career (Producing your own work, auditioning for roles, improving your skills, and networking/marketing).

 

After this period, If I'm not already a full-time working actor at this point, I would move on to the bellow step:

 

2. I'd hold off my acting pursuits altogether for 3 years to focus on law school, articling, and passing the bar (Assuming that running to auditions, and in some cases having to skip class to do so is impossible at law school.)

 

Then finally I would:

 

3. Work as a lawyer while continuing to audition for roles

 

Phase 3 is what I need help with the most. Based on my research these are the broad fields of law I've discovered.

- Biglaw

- In-house

- Mid-size firm practice

- Small firm practice

- Independent practice

 

I assume that Biglaw firm life would not afford me the ability to spend time preparing for auditions (This usually takes me a minimum of five hours), or the time to do the actual auditions which can take anywhere from 40 minutes to 2 hours if you include the time it takes to commute. Being an independent lawyer or working in-house both seem kind of viable but with the nature of law in general where you have unexpected meetings that you can't escape and clients needing you around the clock, I'm losing my faith in the idea of working as a lawyer while auditioning for roles. This is where I need help. Please let me know what you think of my plan, and any solutions to the problems within it would be greatly appreciated.

 

Before I end though, I should mention that there are people who have (Sort of) done what I'm trying to do. For example, Flloyd Kane (read his story here), is an in-house entertainment lawyer who also produces and writes films. His situation differs from mine in that all his pursuits are interconnected, but I imagine it would still be hard to represent a media company while producing a film full time. I'm not sure how he does it.

 

The other person I know is Hill Harper (See his story here). He is an established film & television actor - you may know him from CSI, whose educational background includes a BA in Theatre from Brown, as well as a law degree and a masters in public administration from Harvard. In his case, he gained acting success while pursuing his masters and decided to focus on acting after trying law practice and realizing that he enjoys legal education but not necessarily legal practice.

 

Anyways I hope all this info has been informative of my situation instead of confusing, as I fear it may be. Thank you for taking the time to read this pre-universtiy crisis of mine (I've done a full year of university and am currently taking a year off to work and create a solid career plan before I return to school and commit to a program in September). Please let me know your thoughts.

 

Thank you!

 

 

 

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This...just seems like a poor idea. 

 

Even if you can find that rare law job that might afford you the flexibility to take time off to audition, etc (which is virtually unheard of in entry level positions...) why would they hire someone who is not (or at least appears not to be) as committed as the next candidate? Not only will they have to work around your acting schedule, there's going to be the fear (justified or not) that you'll jump ship as soon as a good acting gig comes along. 

 

Also, while it MIGHT be manageable to handle auditioning for roles while working, what happens if you get the part? As I understand it, acting tends to be very time-consuming (when you can find work) which doesn't mesh well with the the time commitments that most legal positions entail. 

 

Look, I can definitely understand what it's like to have more than one passion (heck, I have three distinct career routes I'd love to take...) However, at some point you have to decide which of your interests is going to form your career, and which are going to be relegated to the 'interest' or 'hobby' category. Now, you can certainly change careers, or one of your hobbies may afford you the opportunity to transition into a related field (or go part-time once you're established as a lawyer) but building two careers simultaneously? I doubt that would work out well on either front.

 

One final note.

 

You're a first year university student. I assume you're 19 or so. There is absolutely no need for you to commit to a career path just yet, and who knows? maybe you won't even have the stats to get into law school when you graduate. So by all means, build your acting portfolio, develop your interests, enjoy your undergrad, and get good grades. That way, you can apply to law school from a position of strength, (with loads of interesting ECs to boot) while still having an alternative career if you decide that law school isn't for you.

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Wow, okay. That's quite the plan. I'll be as blunt as possible, but I hope you take it in the best way possible, as I certainly don't mean it in a negative or malicious way.

 

It sounds like you're trying to embark on a flight of fancy. It's not to say that a lawyer can't be a good actor, or vice-versa, but both career paths require an unbelievable investment of time. It's not realistic to expect to do both. Even the examples you cited aren't fully what they seem: Floyd Kane has been an executive producer for the past decade, which is just a fancy way of saying "he brings the money". He doesn't actually do any substantive work on the final product. Hill Harper wasn't even really a lawyer, just a law student, before transitioning in to acting. What you're suggesting diverges from both of these: you want to be a practicing lawyer while also also doing substantive work as an actor. As far as I am aware, that's never been done simultaneously. 

 

Assuming you succeed at developing yourself professionally as an actor during your undergrad years while maintaining a high average and scoring well on the LSAT (none of which is easy by the way) and you find yourself admitted to law school, disconnecting yourself from the film industry for three years to focus on law school would almost guarantee a complete rollback of all of the progress you made during your undergrad. Unless you end up scoring a big break, the industry very quickly forgets you unless you keep showing up. So you realistically can't afford to take time off completely during law school if you want to be successful as an actor.

 

However, assuming you somehow manage to succeed in law school and resume your work in the film industry, and you're able to juggle your responsibilities at your firm with your extracurriculars, what happens when you score a role? You can't realistically put your files on hold while you go shoot some episodes or a movie; there are people who depend on you, there are deadlines to meet, there are clients to see, partners to keep happy, expectations to satisfy, etc. Unless you're a seasoned lawyer with a partnership and a staff, you won't realistically be able to just take off and be an actor for a week or two a few times a year (or more if you're wildly successful). Then, don't forget the awards circuit you'll be expected to participate in if you do indie work, publicity photo shoots for promo material, ADR for post-production, rehearsals prior to shooting, screen tests, etc.

 

I like the ambition, but it sounds like you found two things that really interest you and you're at a crossroads. Take some time to think about which one appeals to you more and pick that. Both require a huge commitment to become successful. The good news is, you can always try one for a while and change it up if you decide it's not for you, but if you do that, pick acting first because the cost to "give it a shot" isn't tens of thousands of dollars. Becoming a lawyer commits you to the profession for a serious chunk of your life while you pay off your student loans -- it should be approached with commensurate seriousness. 

 

In summary, you can't do both and you really shouldn't even try. Pick one and go with that, but if you pick law, understand that it's not just something you should do for fun while you pursue something more interesting to you.

 

Edit to add: CasualInversion's closing advice is key: you're young and still in your first year of university. Pursue your passion of acting, get good grades, have fun. You may not even want to go to law school after you finish. You may land a huge role and launch your acting career before you even pick up a legal textbook. You may not even be successful in getting admitted to law school. You have several years before you have to focus on making a choice, so soak up what you can for now.

Edited by Ryn
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Bad idea. You should not go through with your dual career plan. You should focus your ambition into one or the other and be great.

 

You're going to have to ask yourself tough questions about what you really want.

 


"I don't want to give up any of these pursuits right now. I love art, but I also love academia and the professional-world and I don't want to limit myself ahead of time."


 


 


It's OK to be unsure. On one hand you have a lifelong desire to pursue law. On the other, a new-found love of acting. We've all been there in one way or another. 


 


Don't fret.


 


 


Like others have said - you have time. Use it wisely:


  • Do well in school. Nothing will limit you faster than poor academic performance. 
  • Pursue your hobbies. Acting is a great way to practice public speaking. 
  • Spend time researching the legal profession. Dig in there and see if that's the career path for you. Really know what you're getting yourself into. Take a second look at the examples you provided and see if you can spot any red flags.
  • Enjoy your life. It's a long road ahead.

If you do your homework, things will become more clear and you'll make a good decision in the end. 


 


Good luck!

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Hi everyone,

 

These responses have been overwhelmingly honest and constructive, not to mention prompt - which is exactly what I was looking for. So thank you for putting so much time and thought into them. My replies are bellow:

 

This...just seems like a poor idea. 

 

Even if you can find that rare law job that might afford you the flexibility to take time off to audition, etc (which is virtually unheard of in entry level positions...) why would they hire someone who is not (or at least appears not to be) as committed as the next candidate? Not only will they have to work around your acting schedule, there's going to be the fear (justified or not) that you'll jump ship as soon as a good acting gig comes along. 

 

Also, while it MIGHT be manageable to handle auditioning for roles while working, what happens if you get the part? As I understand it, acting tends to be very time-consuming (when you can find work) which doesn't mesh well with the the time commitments that most legal positions entail. 

 

Look, I can definitely understand what it's like to have more than one passion (heck, I have three distinct career routes I'd love to take...) However, at some point you have to decide which of your interests is going to form your career, and which are going to be relegated to the 'interest' or 'hobby' category. Now, you can certainly change careers, or one of your hobbies may afford you the opportunity to transition into a related field (or go part-time once you're established as a lawyer) but building two careers simultaneously? I doubt that would work out well on either front.

 

One final note.

 

You're a first year university student. I assume you're 19 or so. There is absolutely no need for you to commit to a career path just yet, and who knows? maybe you won't even have the stats to get into law school when you graduate. So by all means, build your acting portfolio, develop your interests, enjoy your undergrad, and get good grades. That way, you can apply to law school from a position of strength, (with loads of interesting ECs to boot) while still having an alternative career if you decide that law school isn't for you.

 

 

The first point you made is the same point I made in my post, that is, I recognize that it would be nearly impossible to find a law job that provides the flexibility to allow me to do acting as well, and that I would be eventually forced to choose one or the other. I guess what I was trying to highlight is that I want to build success in both careers and have to end up choosing one BECAUSE of success in both, not because I chose one over the other before experiencing them.. I.e. Landing a significant role and then deciding which career matters more to me having gained real experience in both.

 

In regards to the point you brought up about being perceived as a less committed associate at a firm, I completely agree with you in that it would be a negative factor on my law career given the demands and culture of firm life. You're also right that given my age, I should probably slow down and return to exploring career paths versus trying to commit to one (Or in my case two!). Thanks again for your input.

 

Wow, okay. That's quite the plan. I'll be as blunt as possible, but I hope you take it in the best way possible, as I certainly don't mean it in a negative or malicious way.

 

It sounds like you're trying to embark on a flight of fancy. It's not to say that a lawyer can't be a good actor, or vice-versa, but both career paths require an unbelievable investment of time. It's not realistic to expect to do both. Even the examples you cited aren't fully what they seem: Floyd Kane has been an executive producer for the past decade, which is just a fancy way of saying "he brings the money". He doesn't actually do any substantive work on the final product. Hill Harper wasn't even really a lawyer, just a law student, before transitioning in to acting. What you're suggesting diverges from both of these: you want to be a practicing lawyer while also also doing substantive work as an actor. As far as I am aware, that's never been done simultaneously. 

 

Assuming you succeed at developing yourself professionally as an actor during your undergrad years while maintaining a high average and scoring well on the LSAT (none of which is easy by the way) and you find yourself admitted to law school, disconnecting yourself from the film industry for three years to focus on law school would almost guarantee a complete rollback of all of the progress you made during your undergrad. Unless you end up scoring a big break, the industry very quickly forgets you unless you keep showing up. So you realistically can't afford to take time off completely during law school if you want to be successful as an actor.

 

However, assuming you somehow manage to succeed in law school and resume your work in the film industry, and you're able to juggle your responsibilities at your firm with your extracurriculars, what happens when you score a role? You can't realistically put your files on hold while you go shoot some episodes or a movie; there are people who depend on you, there are deadlines to meet, there are clients to see, partners to keep happy, expectations to satisfy, etc. Unless you're a seasoned lawyer with a partnership and a staff, you won't realistically be able to just take off and be an actor for a week or two a few times a year (or more if you're wildly successful). Then, don't forget the awards circuit you'll be expected to participate in if you do indie work, publicity photo shoots for promo material, ADR for post-production, rehearsals prior to shooting, screen tests, etc.

 

I like the ambition, but it sounds like you found two things that really interest you and you're at a crossroads. Take some time to think about which one appeals to you more and pick that. Both require a huge commitment to become successful. The good news is, you can always try one for a while and change it up if you decide it's not for you, but if you do that, pick acting first because the cost to "give it a shot" isn't tens of thousands of dollars. Becoming a lawyer commits you to the profession for a serious chunk of your life while you pay off your student loans -- it should be approached with commensurate seriousness. 

 

In summary, you can't do both and you really shouldn't even try. Pick one and go with that, but if you pick law, understand that it's not just something you should do for fun while you pursue something more interesting to you.

 

Edit to add: CasualInversion's closing advice is key: you're young and still in your first year of university. Pursue your passion of acting, get good grades, have fun. You may not even want to go to law school after you finish. You may land a huge role and launch your acting career before you even pick up a legal textbook. You may not even be successful in getting admitted to law school. You have several years before you have to focus on making a choice, so soak up what you can for now.

 

When I cited Floyd, I pointed out that his situation differs from mine. You're definitely right, he spent a long time working as an executive producer, which would explain how he balanced working as a lawyer with film production. However, since 2011 he has moved into "regular producing." I suspect he now has enough connections and work in the film industry that he possibly has dropped his law commitments to focus on producing and writing. I am not sure. If he hasn't, this is what I meant by I don't know how he does it. I should have worded that better, as I made it seem like I was implying that I know for sure that he currently balances both. As for Hill Harper, again this is poor wording on my part (The irony of wanting to be a lawyer)...When I said he tried law practice, I'm right that he did try it and decided to go into acting, it's just that he didn't experience it as a lawyer called to the bar, but summer associate while in law school. He views education as an exploration, which is a great but for those whose parents are not both physicians, we might be able to getting away with exploring during undergrad, but not necessarily in law or graduate school like he did.

 

As for the rest of what you've said, I agree with pretty much all of it, especially regarding the prospect of losing film industry connections during law school, and about learning to explore passions while I'm young. These are all things for me to strongly consider. Thanks again for taking the time to respond.

 

This may be of interest to you. 

 

Thanks for sharing this. Do you have any idea when he graduated from McGill? He received his first credit in 1997, but I read another article that said he graduated from McGill Law in 2007...I might be mixing up people.

 

 

Bad idea. You should not go through with your dual career plan. You should focus your ambition into one or the other and be great.
 
You're going to have to ask yourself tough questions about what you really want.

 

"I don't want to give up any of these pursuits right now. I love art, but I also love academia and the professional-world and I don't want to limit myself ahead of time."

 

 

It's OK to be unsure. On one hand you have a lifelong desire to pursue law. On the other, a new-found love of acting. We've all been there in one way or another. 

 

Don't fret.

 

 

Like others have said - you have time. Use it wisely:

  • Do well in school. Nothing will limit you faster than poor academic performance. 
  • Pursue your hobbies. Acting is a great way to practice public speaking. 
  • Spend time researching the legal profession. Dig in there and see if that's the career path for you. Really know what you're getting yourself into. Take a second look at the examples you provided and see if you can spot any red flags.
  • Enjoy your life. It's a long road ahead.

If you do your homework, things will become more clear and you'll make a good decision in the end. 

 

Good luck!

 

 

Thank you very much for your input. Everything you've said is very supportive and helpful. I will think about these things as I continue to work out my thoughts. Thanks again.

 

 

Yes.

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I am from a theatre background (it's one of my undergrad degrees, and I have been working in theatre for about 4 years since then). I can talk about the acting aspect of things, if not the law aspect (given that I will be entering my first year in September). Are you interested in theatre or film? Most Canadian actors find that they need to do both to make a living (and in Canada, it is pretty common to have multiple trades, such as the ability to direct, dance, act etc. In the US, you are more likely to find folks who are just actors).

 

I just want to give some advice that I heard from an Artistic Director in Canada once. He was talking to a room full of emerging actors, myself included, and said that if you can imagine yourself doing anything besides acting, then you should do that. Acting is a job that you become married to, because it completely blurs your professional and regular life. You face constant rejection, very little pay (either at first, or forever, depending on your success), and you constantly have to be selling yourself to everyone you meet, because you are the product. It's grueling, and he said that if there is something else that you are passionate about, you should do that. I resented the advice at the time, but it makes sense to me now that I have worked in this industry. Don't get me wrong! It's a rewarding industry! But I couldn't see myself trying to make careers in these two fields at once. Theatre in Canada is such a small community, and it takes SO much time to get yourself in the door, get the training you need (which is a lifelong process -- no good actor ever stops taking workshops and training), entrench yourself in the community, stay *relevant* in the community (so a three year break from auditioning will not help), etc.

 

Film I know less about, but the career trajectories are similar enough, and the two communities seem to know each other pretty well.

 

I work full time at a theatre company, and currently take small acting gigs on the side. Community theatre/semi-professional roles (so pretty much non-paying that didn't do much for my resume) tend to work around full time schedules because they mostly work with emerging artists that need full time work because they aren't currently making enough through acting (and likely won't for years to come). In that time, I also auditioned for professional companies, but ultimately couldn't make the rehearsal process and performance schedule work with my full-time schedule. Unfortunately, it is the professional gigs that you need to build up a resume. It takes years to become successful in acting, unless you are incredibly lucky. 

 

I'll also mention that most big house theatre companies require you to have attended a post-secondary program in theatre in order to audition for them.

 

My point is, after all that rambling, is that at some point something will have to give. Acting is not a part-time job -- it just can't be if you actually want to build a career. It requires constant training and re-training, networking, auditioning (during normal work hours), and the ability to make last minute changes to your schedule. For instance, if you do an audition on Tuesday at 11:00, and take time off of work for it, if you do well, you may get asked to come in the next morning, or even later that day for a callback. How will a full time job respond to you taking time off with no warning?

 

Again, this is the theatre perspective, not film, but the two are similar enough. And I truly think you need to be married to this career if you want to make it work, and I imagine with law, you need to give it your all too.

 

That said, you are still early in your university experience. Definitely audition for film and theatre, on campus and off campus. It's a good way to start building up a resume and a network -- and beyond that, a great way to meet people! Theatre is such a great way to open yourself up and learn about yourself, and I can safely say that if it weren't for theatre, I wouldn't be attending law school. It's a great things to do, and a fantastic career, if you have the patience, the resolve, the work ethic, the time, the flexibility (both personally and job-wise) and the ability to handle rejection on a regular basis. You don't have to make any decisions yet! But I think it is very difficult to build a successful career in two fields that demand so much of you at once. I wouldn't underestimate the amount of time that goes into building an acting career.

 

Hopefully that wasn't completely unhelpful -- I can't be super helpful yet from the law perspective, but if you have any questions about acting in Canada, theatre programs, etc, I have a little insight. Feel free to PM me!

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Be aware that once a lawyer, you are always governed by your law society rules and the professional code of conduct even if you are not acting as a lawyer in whatever capacity.

 

For example in BC:

 

[1]  The term “outside interest” covers the widest possible range of activities and includes activities that may overlap or be connected with the practice of law such as engaging in the mortgage business, acting as a director of a client corporation or writing on legal subjects, as well as activities not so connected, such as a career in business, politics, broadcasting or the performing arts. In each case, the question of whether and to what extent the lawyer may be permitted to engage in the outside interest will be subject to any applicable law or rule of the Society.

 

[2]  When the outside interest is not related to the legal services being performed for clients, ethical considerations will usually not arise unless the lawyer’s conduct might bring the lawyer or the profession into disrepute or impair the lawyer’s competence, such as if the outside interest might occupy so much time that clients’ interests would suffer because of inattention or lack of preparation.

[bolding added]

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Be aware that once a lawyer, you are always governed by your law society rules and the professional code of conduct even if you are not acting as a lawyer in whatever capacity.

 

For example in BC:

 

Fortunately there's no rule, that I know of, that forbids you from bringing the acting profession into disrepute. Therefore, from their end at least, they should be fine with you cross-training as a lawyer.

 

That said, this is still an insane plan. Your only viable chance at doing both would be to become established enough in one field that you can demand some accommodation and your quirks are allowed. In other words, become a lawyer, become indispensable (or at least self-employed), and only then see about auditions. Or else become an actor, become very successful to the point where you can pick your parts and set your schedule (to at least some degree) and then return to law school. Yes, either of those things is incredibly unlikely. But then so is your plan as a whole.

 

Good luck.

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Over the years I have known a handful of lawyers who have made acting / theatre a major hobby of theirs, and have acted in numerous community-run theatre productions. That's obviously not the same as pursuing a career in acting, but if you decide to pursue law that doesn't mean you can't still be involved in acting/theatre.

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Fortunately there's no rule, that I know of, that forbids you from bringing the acting profession into disrepute. Therefore, from their end at least, they should be fine with you cross-training as a lawyer.

 

That said, this is still an insane plan. Your only viable chance at doing both would be to become established enough in one field that you can demand some accommodation and your quirks are allowed. In other words, become a lawyer, become indispensable (or at least self-employed), and only then see about auditions. Or else become an actor, become very successful to the point where you can pick your parts and set your schedule (to at least some degree) and then return to law school. Yes, either of those things is incredibly unlikely. But then so is your plan as a whole.

 

Good luck.

Sounds like Fred Thompson's career path!

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Thompson

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The simple answer to your question is no, it is not possible.

 

However, many/most large cities across the country have a Lawyer Play every year. So, yes, you could still participate in theatre for fun. That's if you get cast! ;)

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Its just not a feasible idea. Its hard to imagine you will have the time and that your employer would even allow you the time for the other opportunity. Like some have said, acting could be something that you might be able to do after you have gained some experience and have moved up the ladder. 

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You could always audition for roles in legal dramas. 

 

But really, it's very unrealistic to think that you can simultaneously gain success in both and then choose one unless you have some really strong connections. During undergrad you have more flexibility, so enjoy it and pursue your hobbies. You can study something like theatre or take philosophy courses (ethics, logic, etc), audition for roles, etc. Rather than jumping into law school you can take a few years off after UG to pursue acting. It doesn't mean you're choosing it over law, but it's probably much easier to do than the alternative (law school first and then acting). If you're still actively considering law school after gaining experience in acting, then write the LSAT and apply. You might not be able to return to acting (as a full-time career) while still practicing as a lawyer, but at least you'd have those years of experience/pursuing a passion of yours. You can always return to acting later down the line. 

 

Neither of those careers are going anywhere, so rather than trying to chase success in both at the same time keep both options open during undergrad but then seriously commit to one at a time. 

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Follow your dreams OP!! I honestly don't see why you can't squeeze in some auditions in between your legal education and career. Hell, you're far from the only lawyer with ambitions to be a star of the stage.

 

:wink:

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Greg Giraldo gave show business a shot after going to Harvard Law. So there's that...

 

If I were you though, I wouldn't stretch myself too thin. It might seem fun to do both things you love... but the time constraint from both law and show business would be huge. You would have almost no time for anything else (family, friends, other grown up activities). No matter how much you love something (or two things in your case), you're going to want down time away from these activities. In this case you wouldn't get that time, and in all likelihood start hating one or both of them. I'd say keep one a passing interest that you can take time away from if necessary to focus on the other.

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Seriously OP, if there's one thing I've actually learned about the law, it's that you can't let it bulldoze over the rest of your life. If acting is important to you, then go for it. You'll figure out quickly enough whether you can do both, and if not, which one you want to stick with.

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    • you might be ok to apply to a school that looks at your best 2 then, but you'll be limiting yourself to those. law school is going to be really expensive, $100,00 . I wouldn't worry about doing one more year in undergrad because it will be a drop in the bucket to what you'll spend total. However, it will increase your chances of getting in by a lot. You also should be confident that you can do better in courses you repeat if you do choose to.
    • Alright, so Queens is a Best two school that will take your 3.5 (once converted to the OLSAS grading scale, which may lower it a tad). Do you know your last two years gpa? Schools like Western and Dalhousie use your last two. 
    • Hopefully the diverse group didn't do arts in undergrad
    • You know, I'm really not here to make this into an argument. Though considering the OP's questionably good-faith in starting the thread initially, maybe there's no other purpose to this now. But I'm honestly not even sure what I'm being called out for. You say this sort of priority can be important to people. I don't disagree with either that statement as truth, or with someone choosing to have this priority when they have it. I was explicitly clear I'm not questioning anyone's priorities. Then I stated something of my own as truth. That this priority - however or whyever it may be held - will be limiting. You haven't disagreed with that statement either. Then you told me to do more training. Which is honestly a recommendation that I go and get my ideology corrected by more sensitive people than I am. As in, fuck you and your regressive beliefs, but you know, politely. What the holy fuck did I even do that bothered you aside from stating a truth that you would prefer not to be true? We agree on the facts. And if you think I need to be ideologically corrected in terms of pretending that true things aren't true just to make people feel more comfortable, I could argue that you need to be professionally retrained into acknowledging that true things remain true regardless of whether they suck or not, and regardless of your feelings about them, and our jobs as lawyers often involves dealing with true things even when we don't like that they are true. I chose to ignore this the first time. But telling me to go get better training is fucking obnoxious. I've never yet had EDI hours that encouraged me to ignore truth just because it was uncomfortable truth. And even if I had that training, speaking as someone who has delivered CPD myself, I'm not under any illusions that crediting someone with the ability to train others makes their opinions superior in some absolute way. Ideology remains ideology even when it's given a gloss of legitimacy by forcing other people to listen to it and calling it "training." And any ideology that requires me to pretend something isn't true just to make people feel better about the world, rather than dealing with truth and helping them function in the world, is stupid and irresponsible. And antithetical to good lawyering.
    • @Toby1994I calculated this with drops and my best gpa for my best 2 years (first and second year) was 3.5.  

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