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throwman

Looking at applying in four years. Chances?

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I have a bachelors degree in Political Science with a GPA of a 3.05 from an American University.During my time in undergrad I was a NCAA Division 1 athlete.   I am a first nations member and have been working as Court Administrator for my Tribal Court for the last 2 years. I am also an Olympic alternate and Canadian national champion. I plan to try and make the next Olympic games in 2020 and apply to law school after that. 

 

I have strong references from my time working in my Tribal Court and believe that I will only gain more in the next four years. I have not yet started studying for the LSAT but am planning on starting studying in the next year or so.  What do you think are my chances and what do you believe I could be doing to better my chances? What kind of LSAT score do you think I would need to get?  

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Well, your background is extremely impressive, and you will definitely get looked at in a more positive light given that you are a first nation's member. They may even have a separate application section for you, but i'm not sure about this. 

 

Your GPA is fairly low, but given how holistic McGill is, it may be the best school to apply to for it. Aim your lsat for a 180 (seriously I tell this to everyone, because it honestly affects you subconciously and you end up doing less well than your true potential). Pragmatically, you'd want to aim above their median which last year was a 161 or 162, but this can vary significantly between now and 2020. 

 

Noone can give you a true accurate chances without seeing how you do on the lsat, but definitely write it I'd say because you have a shot. Just remember that you need a solid oral and reading comprehension of french for McGill, so work on that if you can until 2020 if need be.

 

If you have any other questions, feel free to PM me. 

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I don't know much about McGill, but I suspect you'll be fine based on the information you've provided.

 

Aim your lsat for a 180 (seriously I tell this to everyone, because it honestly affects you subconciously and you end up doing less well than your true potential). Pragmatically, you'd want to aim above their median which last year was a 161 or 162, but this can vary significantly between now and 2020. 

 

I love this advice. Whenever someone asks what LSAT they need to aim for and someone else says "160", I imagine them just deliberately tanking one section in order to make sure they get 160 and not a 161. "Oh, those bubbles? I didn't bother filling those in. I only needed a 160, and I felt like I already had that based on my performance from the first few sections." And then they get a 142. The answer to, "What LSAT score do I need?", is always, always, always, always "the best LSAT score you are capable of getting". It's unreasonable for everyone to expect to get a 180, but it's ridiculous to deliberately aim for anything else.

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I have a bachelors degree in Political Science with a GPA of a 3.05 from an American University.During my time in undergrad I was a NCAA Division 1 athlete.   I am a first nations member and have been working as Court Administrator for my Tribal Court for the last 2 years. I am also an Olympic alternate and Canadian national champion. I plan to try and make the next Olympic games in 2020 and apply to law school after that. 

 

I have strong references from my time working in my Tribal Court and believe that I will only gain more in the next four years. I have not yet started studying for the LSAT but am planning on starting studying in the next year or so.  What do you think are my chances and what do you believe I could be doing to better my chances? What kind of LSAT score do you think I would need to get?  

 

You sound like an ideal candidate. One fear the admission committee may have is that you could have a hard time coping with the high level of excellence (blah blah blah) of a very demanding academic program. If you can take a law course (an evening class maybe) and ace it and add it to your application it could possibly help, it won't change your GPA but could make it clear that you are capable of excelling in a law class. For the LSAT, make sure first that it won't hurt you, better no LSAT than a crappy one for McGill. Good luck !

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I don't know much about McGill, but I suspect you'll be fine based on the information you've provided.

 

 

I love this advice. Whenever someone asks what LSAT they need to aim for and someone else says "160", I imagine them just deliberately tanking one section in order to make sure they get 160 and not a 161. "Oh, those bubbles? I didn't bother filling those in. I only needed a 160, and I felt like I already had that based on my performance from the first few sections." And then they get a 142. The answer to, "What LSAT score do I need?", is always, always, always, always "the best LSAT score you are capable of getting". It's unreasonable for everyone to expect to get a 180, but it's ridiculous to deliberately aim for anything else.

Yes, to a certain extent. I find the people who score lowest on the LSAT are often those who are too concerned with getting a question wrong rather than "moving on." Worse yet, those who dwell too much on getting a question wrong that it affects their subsequent sections. The ability to move on and stay positive is extremely important on the LSAT and with a 180 target, you could run into trouble. 

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