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On 13/08/2018 at 6:15 PM, GoLeafsGo said:

Do you recommend attending orientation?

Yes! I was really nervous about attending orientation last year, but it was completely worth it. I met a lot of people who are now my best friends and many more people besides! I've been to a couple of O-weeks and the QL one was by far the best. Your mileage may vary, but if you're open to meeting new people and don't mind being asked where you did your undergrad a thousand times, you'll be just fine.

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7 hours ago, Jackiechiles2 said:

Is suit and tie the dress code for the end of orientation gala? 

If I remember correctly, i think that’s what most guys wore last year. I believe the event is billed as semi formal, so I think you could get away with no jacket, but at least a shirt and tie. 

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2 hours ago, GoLeafsGo said:

How often is it feasible to go home? What is generally recommended?

That depends. Is home in Wolf Island, Napanee, Toronto, Vancouver, Halifax...NYC...?
 

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1 hour ago, Kfirnik said:

That depends. Is home in Wolf Island, Napanee, Toronto, Vancouver, Halifax...NYC...?
 

Sorry I should have clarified this. Home is Toronto. 

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14 hours ago, GoLeafsGo said:

Sorry I should have clarified this. Home is Toronto. 

Every weekend if you want

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3 hours ago, wanderlawst1 said:

Every weekend if you want

Is that feasible with the workload? How often would be recommended?

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2 hours ago, GoLeafsGo said:

Is that feasible with the workload? How often would be recommended?

I went years ago, but I'm going to chime in anyway.

Some people had family (spouse/children) living elsewhere, they worked a lot during the week, made it to very few social events, went home to their family almost every weekend as I recall. They were focused on getting as much work done during the week as possible, obviously almost never made it to evening (especially Friday evening) social events. That totally made sense.

But unless you have a spouse/SO who needs to live in Toronto for work, or something, why would you be planning to go back to Toronto (that you call it "home" is interesting) that often? I mean, if you have family other than SO or children (parents, siblings) or friends in Toronto, I can understand wanting to visit frequently if you get along well, but there's no recommended schedule! If it's someone's birthday, or you're stressed and can relax with non-law people, or whatever, maybe you go back that weekend, and otherwise you don't. I don't understand why you're asking how often would be recommended.

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I went to Ottawa every other weekend to visit my partner in first year.  I could get all my weekly reading done on the bus/train rides to and from. Did very little, actually probably no work, during the weekend. 

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On 8/17/2018 at 2:06 PM, GoLeafsGo said:

How often is it feasible to go home? What is generally recommended?

I just finished 1L. Many, many of my classmates are from Toronto (or Toronto- area). Some went home every/ most weekends. They were less involved in student life, or else we’re not super on top of class work. Some went home for holidays/ if a special event came up. Some avoided home like the plague. There are lots of Kingston-Toronto transit options, so that won’t be an issue. Basically, go home as much as you want/ as much as your schedule allows

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Hellloooo past 1L's / past students in general, 

I'm wondering if anyone who participated in a work study would be able to provide insight on whether it was feasible with their workload/if they would recommend doing it?  Or, did anyone tutor undergraduate courses while in 1L - was it something you'd recommend over a work study? Ideally, I'd like to make some money while in school, but I don't want to have too much going on at once. 

(As background, I tutored 1st year chem when I was in 4th year, so I'm not completely new to it)

Also, I was an idiot and posted this as a new topic...when I meant to post it here, so, sorry if people see this twice - my bad. 

Thanks!!

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3 hours ago, RZane said:

Hellloooo past 1L's / past students in general, 

I'm wondering if anyone who participated in a work study would be able to provide insight on whether it was feasible with their workload/if they would recommend doing it?  Or, did anyone tutor undergraduate courses while in 1L - was it something you'd recommend over a work study? Ideally, I'd like to make some money while in school, but I don't want to have too much going on at once. 

(As background, I tutored 1st year chem when I was in 4th year, so I'm not completely new to it)

Also, I was an idiot and posted this as a new topic...when I meant to post it here, so, sorry if people see this twice - my bad. 

Thanks!!

I asked this same question (check out pages 9 and 10 of this thread if you want to see the responses) and basically everyone advised against working as first year is considered the most difficult year and you want to maximize your academic potential. 

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On 8/27/2018 at 7:07 PM, RZane said:

Hellloooo past 1L's / past students in general, 

I'm wondering if anyone who participated in a work study would be able to provide insight on whether it was feasible with their workload/if they would recommend doing it?  Or, did anyone tutor undergraduate courses while in 1L - was it something you'd recommend over a work study? Ideally, I'd like to make some money while in school, but I don't want to have too much going on at once. 

(As background, I tutored 1st year chem when I was in 4th year, so I'm not completely new to it)

Also, I was an idiot and posted this as a new topic...when I meant to post it here, so, sorry if people see this twice - my bad. 

Thanks!!

The law school library typically hires and doesn't involve too much work. And I have seen quite a few law students work for them. Could be an option for you. 

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I'm not sure if this has already been asked but I read that the Queen's personal statement cannot exceed 6000 words and all I have at the moment is 1500. I'm wondering if that's too short or if it would look bad?

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6 minutes ago, Harjot said:

I'm not sure if this has already been asked but I read that the Queen's personal statement cannot exceed 6000 words and all I have at the moment is 1500. I'm wondering if that's too short or if it would look bad?

Yes that would look bad. You don't need to use up all of the space but that's WAY under and will look like you were too lazy to write more or had nothing interesting to say. It will never send a good message.

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6000 words or characters? 6000 words seems like a lot. 

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20 minutes ago, Adrian said:

6000 words or characters? 6000 words seems like a lot. 

6000 characters is the limit. If (s)he’s at 1500 words, they’re way over the limit 

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6 hours ago, RNGesus said:

6000 characters is the limit. If (s)he’s at 1500 words, they’re way over the limit 

Yeah I came to that realization last night. I guess I just read it wrong, aha. Thanks though!

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