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They were not lenient at all towards me. I even appealed my late fee since I had a reasonable excuse but got shut down. $360...like every other programs' late fees are around $100ish but law school, nope! 

 

Ouch!

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What are the typical internet providers people go with in London? Rogers seems to be a bit pricey (especially for one person)

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What are the typical internet providers people go with in London? Rogers seems to be a bit pricey (especially for one person)

 

I have mine through Primus.

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What are the typical internet providers people go with in London? Rogers seems to be a bit pricey (especially for one person)

 

TekSavvy was awesome for the years I was in London.

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What are the typical internet providers people go with in London? Rogers seems to be a bit pricey (especially for one person)

 

TekSavvy is what I use too. Reliable and relatively cheap

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What are the typical internet providers people go with in London? Rogers seems to be a bit pricey (especially for one person)

Rogers in London always offers a student deal come August. 8 month contract, no activation fee, price is locked for the entire month. Unless you're moving to London soon, just wait to see what they offer this year before committing to another provider

 

I know people who used TekSavvy and liked it, I just can't personally vouch for it. During my undergrad at Wester I lived in a house of 7 guys, and our Rogers internet always kept up

Edited by InsertPseudonymHere

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I think we were told in our welcome package that 1L course schedule will be handed out the first day of orientation (correct me if I'm wrong). Is there no way of seeing a class schedule ahead of time? Online perhaps?

 

**I'm obviously not looking for a personal class schedule, more of a general course timetable for 1L

Edited by lucysweb2001

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I think we were told in our welcome package that 1L course schedule will be handed out the first day of orientation (correct me if I'm wrong). Is there no way of seeing a class schedule ahead of time? Online perhaps?

 

**I'm obviously not looking for a personal class schedule, more of a general course timetable for 1L

 

You could try emailing Mysty, but I'm not sure if they would even have that finalized. Upper year course info isn't online yet.

 

Plus, depending which small group you're in, it could vary wildly. Some people had late classes, some had early, some had days off, other's had class 5 days a week...

 

edit: And yes, you get your course schedule for your small group at orientation!

Edited by Cabaret

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Hi everyone,

 

Does anyone know if Western Law makes their mark breakdowns for Fall/Winter terms available?

 

Something like this from Queen's, which is accessible through the Queen's law website: http://law.queensu.ca/sites/webpublish.queensu.ca.lawwww/files/files/JD%20Studies/Grading%20%26%20Exams/Winter%202016%20Grade%20Breakdown%20Sheet%20-%20May%2018-16.pdf  

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Hi everyone,

 

Does anyone know if Western Law makes their mark breakdowns for Fall/Winter terms available?

 

Something like this from Queen's, which is accessible through the Queen's law website: http://law.queensu.ca/sites/webpublish.queensu.ca.lawwww/files/files/JD%20Studies/Grading%20%26%20Exams/Winter%202016%20Grade%20Breakdown%20Sheet%20-%20May%2018-16.pdf  

 

Grade distributions are available to law students (via "OWL"), but to my knowledge Western does not make them publicly available.

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As stated, the documents are available to law students but not public. However, if you want to read about how the grade distributions are calculated, check here: http://law.uwo.ca/current_students/student_services/academic_policies_and_procedures.html#evaluation

 

Hi everyone,

 

Does anyone know if Western Law makes their mark breakdowns for Fall/Winter terms available?

 

Something like this from Queen's, which is accessible through the Queen's law website: http://law.queensu.ca/sites/webpublish.queensu.ca.lawwww/files/files/JD%20Studies/Grading%20%26%20Exams/Winter%202016%20Grade%20Breakdown%20Sheet%20-%20May%2018-16.pdf  

 

Sort of off-topic, but it's actually interesting that Queens has B+ curve 1L courses, and even the B curve courses are very high (example: class of 46 students, only 3 are below a B, yet the class is still deemed a B curve).

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Grade distributions are available to law students (via "OWL"), but to my knowledge Western does not make them publicly available.

 

 

Gotcha, thanks for confirming.

 

 

As stated, the documents are available to law students but not public. However, if you want to read about how the grade distributions are calculated, check here: http://law.uwo.ca/current_students/student_services/academic_policies_and_procedures.html#evaluation

 

 

Sort of off-topic, but it's actually interesting that Queens has B+ curve 1L courses, and even the B curve courses are very high (example: class of 46 students, only 3 are below a B, yet the class is still deemed a B curve).

 

 

I found this interesting as well. I was discussing this with a recent grad from UofM law (Robson Hall) and, using the most recent distribution available from UofM: http://law.robsonhall.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/April_2015.pdf, noted how drastically they vary from Queen's in terms of "C" grades received. Robson Hall doesn't use A- or B-, which probably explains this.

 

Do firms take into consideration the different grading schemes when considering an applicant's marks? If not, then wouldn't it be disadvantageous to be marked on a scale that doesn't include B-?

 

Sorry for taking the thread off-topic :) I never thought I'd be lucky enough to have offers from both Western and Queen's, and I'm literally leaving no stone unturned.

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I found this interesting as well. I was discussing this with a recent grad from UofM law (Robson Hall) and, using the most recent distribution available from UofM: http://law.robsonhall.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/April_2015.pdf, noted how drastically they vary from Queen's in terms of "C" grades received. Robson Hall doesn't use A- or B-, which probably explains this.

 

Do firms take into consideration the different grading schemes when considering an applicant's marks? If not, then wouldn't it be disadvantageous to be marked on a scale that doesn't include B-?

 

Sorry for taking the thread off-topic :) I never thought I'd be lucky enough to have offers from both Western and Queen's, and I'm literally leaving no stone unturned.

 

 

Congrats on the offers. Turning over every stone is definitely not a bad idea :)

 

In regards to OCI recruitment process, it won't make any difference on job prospects for two reasons:

 

- First, as you referenced, firms are aware of differing grading schemes (or so I've been told).

 

- Second and more importantly, your marks are only really relevant in comparison to the classmates from your school. For example, if X firm has 20 interview slots at Western, they'll (obviously) only fill those slots with the 20 "best" (in their determination) students from Western. Same for every other school. So your marks compared to the marks of students at other schools won't matter for getting an OCI. After that, it's in-firm interviews, where marks are no longer relevant (again, so I've been told) unless, perhaps, you're at the top of your class, but again that would be determined per school.

 

As evidence, you'd really only have to the Ultra Vires student recruitment numbers, which show the same % of Western and Queens students landing jobs through the OCI process (though that has changed now that Queens has increased its class size, causing its % to drop a few points, though the actual number of students is the same).

 

Hope that helps!

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Hi all,

 

Any information would be much appreciated on these questions:

 

1) Which (or how many) moots are available to first years?

 

2) Does anyone have information on the competitiveness of the ISLIP positions? Ie. how many are available per year, are they all funded, do they tend to get a lot of applicants, how do you go about "creating your own" internship.. etc.

 

3) If I recall correctly, I was told the Business Law Clinic was a 3 year commitment, is this true? Ie. If you're involved first year you must continue with the clinic for the remaining years ... Typing this out now makes it sound sinister. I'd like to potentially try a few clinics (if possible) based on my varied interests.

 

4) Does anyone have, or know of someone with, experience learning another language through the university during law school? I'd like to become fluent in French eventually for the civil program, which is why I ask. (I'm aware of the Francais Juridique course and the French Club, which both sound great).

 

Edit:

5) What kind of courses are offered for the upper year intensives? Are there choices? Have you found the intensives to be very worthwhile (in any and all years), as I think Western is the only school that offers them.

 

6) Are there regular speakers giving talks at the law school?

 

Thanks in advance!

Edited by futureca

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Hi futerca,

 

1) Which (or how many) moots are available to first years?

There are plenty of moots available to first years. There are some January-term/external moots which are only available to upper years and require application. There is also another moot which forms the basis for these applications that occurs in the fall, called Lerners, which is only available to upper years. Beyond that, any moot is available to all years or to only 1Ls. I would estimate there is about 1 per month, but there are actually more. Some of these are pretty large and get 30-50 people involved. Others have limited spaces so you have to sign up quickly - about 16 slots, for example. In the winter there are three 1L exclusive themed moots (which you can only do one of) and another one in March that simulates Lerners and is also 1Ls only. There are also "moots" that aren't really moots, such as negotiation, client intake, and contract drafting competitions.

 

2) Does anyone have information on the competitiveness of the ISLIP positions? Ie. how many are available per year, are they all funded, do they tend to get a lot of applicants, how do you go about "creating your own" internship.. etc.

I can't really speak about this, I'll let someone else do that. But from what I understand they are fairly competitive, mostly go to people applying for 2L summer (though some to 1L summer). There are about 12? Positions (maybe there are more, again, someone else will have to confirm this). They are all funded to different degrees, they all get a fair amount of applicants. To create your own you essentially have to reach out to an organization and lock down the position, and then request Western to fund it.

  

3) If I recall correctly, I was told the Business Law Clinic was a 3 year commitment, is this true? Ie. If you're involved first year you must continue with the clinic for the remaining years ... Typing this out now makes it sound sinister. I'd like to potentially try a few clinics (if possible) based on my varied interests.

I don't think there is anything that officially says the clinics are 3-year commitments but the 1L hires more or less form the basis for the 2L and 3L positions. So that's how that works. I think its strongly recommended that if you are offered positions in upper years that you take them. You can apply for different clinics though in different years. 

 

4) Does anyone have, or know of someone with, experience learning another language through the university during law school? I'd like to become fluent in French eventually for the civil program, which is why I ask. (I'm aware of the Francais Juridique course and the French Club, which both sound great).

I would definitely check out the French club. I would also recommend that the best way to do that is to take lessons on the side, if you can find the time and money, or possibly use Rosetta stone. I know people from the school though that are involved in the French and German clubs and enjoy them. 

 

5) What kind of courses are offered for the upper year intensives? Are there choices? Have you found the intensives to be very worthwhile (in any and all years), as I think Western is the only school that offers them.

I haven't taken an upper year intensive - I'm just heading into 2L now. If you are referring to the January term courses, they are mostly practical/application/placement courses, or external moot teams.  

 

6) Are there regular speakers giving talks at the law school?

There are many, many speakers. If I said there was a speaker every day I would probably not be exaggerating. If there isn't one every day, its close. There is always something to do. Often there are multiple speakers on the same day.

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I've answered the questions that I can...

 

1) Which (or how many) moots are available to first years?

 

Unless indicated otherwise, most of the moots/competitions listed on this webpage are open to first year students.

 

2) Does anyone have information on the competitiveness of the ISLIP positions? Ie. how many are available per year, are they all funded, do they tend to get a lot of applicants, how do you go about "creating your own" internship.. etc.

 

ISLIP positions are competitive.  From what I hear (take this with a grain of salt -- it's purely anecdotal), you need to have at least a B+ average on your midterms to have a chance.  I think there are typically ~10 opportunities each year.  They are "funded" in the sense that you are given a ~$10,000 CAD stipend.  That said, and as I'm sure you can imagine, $10,000 isn't a boatload of money if you're going to be living and working in places with relatively high costs of living (e.g. NYC, Switzerland). If you do an ISLIP internship, you're probably in it for the experience (which, to be sure, is a once-in-a-lifetime experience), not the money.

 

3) If I recall correctly, I was told the Business Law Clinic was a 3 year commitment, is this true? Ie. If you're involved first year you must continue with the clinic for the remaining years ... Typing this out now makes it sound sinister. I'd like to potentially try a few clinics (if possible) based on my varied interests.

 

Yes, this is true.  However, you are assigned to a team of 3, comprised of one 1L, one 2L, and one 3L.  Typically, you'll have much more involvement in 1L and 2L than you will in 3L.  Depending on your client and how much time you dedicate to your schoolwork, you may or may not have enough time to get involved in other clinics.

 

...

 

6) Are there regular speakers giving talks at the law school?

 

Yes, there are many speakers.  This past year we had Marie Henein and Chief Justice McLachlin, but those were some of the more "high profile" speakers we've had -- there are also a number of talks given by practitioners and visiting academics. Keep your eye out for posters on the wall, and pay attention to the "SLS Daily" email that you will receive each morning.

Edited by Rearden

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Congrats on the offers. Turning over every stone is definitely not a bad idea :)

 

In regards to OCI recruitment process, it won't make any difference on job prospects for two reasons:

 

- First, as you referenced, firms are aware of differing grading schemes (or so I've been told).

 

- Second and more importantly, your marks are only really relevant in comparison to the classmates from your school. For example, if X firm has 20 interview slots at Western, they'll (obviously) only fill those slots with the 20 "best" (in their determination) students from Western. Same for every other school. So your marks compared to the marks of students at other schools won't matter for getting an OCI. After that, it's in-firm interviews, where marks are no longer relevant (again, so I've been told) unless, perhaps, you're at the top of your class, but again that would be determined per school.

 

As evidence, you'd really only have to the Ultra Vires student recruitment numbers, which show the same % of Western and Queens students landing jobs through the OCI process (though that has changed now that Queens has increased its class size, causing its % to drop a few points, though the actual number of students is the same).

 

Hope that helps!

 

Thanks! This has made things much clearer regarding the OCI's.

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1) Which (or how many) moots are available to first years?

 

2) Does anyone have information on the competitiveness of the ISLIP positions? Ie. how many are available per year, are they all funded, do they tend to get a lot of applicants, how do you go about "creating your own" internship.. etc.

 

6) Are there regular speakers giving talks at the law school?

 

1) As Ben said above, there are lots open to first years! And some exclusive to 1Ls, so you will have lots of chances to gain mooting/advocacy experience (if you want it).

 

2) There were 15 internships this year (plus anyone who went self-proposed - I don't know about that). They are all funded with the stipend mentioned above. 3 were exclusive to 1Ls (World Bank, McCarthy Tetrault business law, Cassels Brock mining finance). Out of the 15, I know that at least 8 went to 1Ls (that includes the 3 that are 1L-only).

 

6) Yes. Always. There are so many talks you can't possibly attend them all without getting burned out. Some provide snacks. 

Edited by Cabaret

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