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On 3/18/2019 at 8:15 AM, georgecostanzajr said:

It really depends on the moot. The actual "session" of the moot lasts no longer than one-hour typically. However, the preparation can be far more than that. There are intensive moots in upper years that teams use weeks to prepare for. But, there are also simple moots such as the Cherniak cup which shouldn't take more than a few hours to prepare for.

Thanks. Makes sense. 

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Hi everyone,

I have some questions, hoping for some 1L input here.

 

1) how are first year classes graded? Does class participation and midterms count or is it mostly finals? What is the percentage breakdown like?

 

2) how hard is it to get all A’s in Western? Is that even possible?

 

3) how hard is it to volunteer for the Western Journal. I have some background in academic research, would that be sufficient?

4) are there any dance/sports/art clubs for law students?

4) I don’t drive at all. I rather not take the public transit if I can help it. Are there accommodations close to the law building that are relatively new (I.e like Clare hall) or close to grocery places etc?

 

Will really appreciate your input! thanks guys

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1 hour ago, Snowflakes said:

Hi everyone,

I have some questions, hoping for some 1L input here.

 

1) how are first year classes graded? Does class participation and midterms count or is it mostly finals? What is the percentage breakdown like?

 

2) how hard is it to get all A’s in Western? Is that even possible?

 

3) how hard is it to volunteer for the Western Journal. I have some background in academic research, would that be sufficient?

4) are there any dance/sports/art clubs for law students?

4) I don’t drive at all. I rather not take the public transit if I can help it. Are there accommodations close to the law building that are relatively new (I.e like Clare hall) or close to grocery places etc?

 

Will really appreciate your input! thanks guys

1) Mostly based on the final.  The midterm will generally be around 30% and the final around 70% of your final grade.  Some classes, particularly your small group class, will have a ~10% participation grade, but participation grades aren't significant. 

2) Basically impossible.  There are undergrad gold medallists who don't have straight As.  I'm sure there are a couple people who have straight As, but no more than a couple.  It's also worth noting that you don't really need straight As for anything.  

3)  I don't know how hard it is to get onto the journal, but I know there are quite a few spots.  The research background probably helps, but it won't get you a spot by itself.  They basically test everyone interested in the journal at the beginning of the year (they give you part of an article and you're asked to identify the errors) and then I believe the ones who did well are either interviewed or offered spots.  I don't remember if there was an interview process or not.  

4) Yeah, lots. 

4(2)) Kinda, but I wouldn't recommend them because that's where all the undergrads live.  Everyone I know either takes the bus or drives.  

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On 3/20/2019 at 8:23 PM, Snowflakes said:

2) how hard is it to get all A’s in Western? Is that even possible?

I am not a 1L. One might say I am a "5L" (good grief where did the time go). But I thought I'd chime in and help you out, and also provide this information to others who may not understand how law school grading works.

Law school classes are graded on a curve, generally curved to a "B" (specifically in 1L). What this means is that your individual level of achievement is relatively meaningless; what matters is how you compare against the rest of your class.

For example - let's say you get a 75% on your first year criminal law exam as a raw score. In an undergrad program, that would compute to a "B". But in law school it's not so simple! If everyone else in your class scored in the 50s, and you got a 75, you might have an A+. If everyone else got a 77, and you only got a 75, you may end up with a C.

Different classes and different professors are known to have different "curves". Some classes have a "flat curve" (e.g. out of 60 people, maybe 40 get Bs, 10 get a B+ and 10 get a B-). Others may have a very "steep curve" (e.g. out of 60 people, maybe 10 get Bs, 10 get a B+, 10 get a B-, 10 get an A-, 10 get a C+, 5 get a flat A and 5 get a flat C). You can picture how the same person taking these two classes could end up with wildly different grades.

So to answer your second question, in order to get A's in every class, you would have to perform better than basically everyone else in every one of your classes. That's statistically improbable, because law school is full of smart, hard-working people, all of whom want to be top of their class. And the fact is, you simply cannot ALL be top of the class.

I'd note that while different schools may have slight differences in how they handle grading, every Ontario law school grades on a curve like this. This is not a Western-specific phenomenon.

Hopefully that helps.

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2 quick question: 

How much reading is (typically) exepcted per class/per week? I know classes will have a lot of variety but what is the average?

 

Does the law building have lockers? if so, how much are they to rent?

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9 hours ago, lawgirl1234567f said:

2 quick question: 

How much reading is (typically) exepcted per class/per week? I know classes will have a lot of variety but what is the average?

 

Does the law building have lockers? if so, how much are they to rent?

The building has lockers. I believe they were free in 1L, and then something like $5 a year in upper years? It might even be a refundable deposit.

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On 4/13/2019 at 3:03 PM, lawgirl1234567f said:

2 quick question: 

How much reading is (typically) exepcted per class/per week? I know classes will have a lot of variety but what is the average?

 

Does the law building have lockers? if so, how much are they to rent?

(1) You are correct in that the classes have a significant amount of variety. Some classes have 10 pages a week while others have 50. On average per class per week I'd say 20-30 pages.

(2) Yes, they do, and they're provided for free to 1Ls. Not sure about upper years. But as the poster above mentioned, they're available as well.

Edited by georgecostanzajr

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