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Hi Everyone,

I'm interested in applying for a clinic in 1L, and since applications are due in September I'd like to get a jump on mine now. What exactly are the applications comprised of?

Thanks for your help! :)

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1 hour ago, McWoods said:

Hi Everyone,

I'm interested in applying for a clinic in 1L, and since applications are due in September I'd like to get a jump on mine now. What exactly are the applications comprised of?

Thanks for your help!

If you want to get a jump on applications I would just make sure you have an updated resume. Last year for biz law and sport clinic you just need to submit a resume and cover letter. I cant speak for the other clinics as I did not apply but you can pretty much guarantee you'll be submitting a resume/cover letter wherever you apply. If there further application requirements for the other clinics maybe someone else can chime in.

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How many people would you typically present to in a moot? Overall, do law students have to give any presentations to large crowds or is it just in our small groups? Unfortunately, public speaking is not my strong suit and I wanted to how if I should come prepared or If there would be opportunity to learn these skills at law school. 

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18 hours ago, awesd said:

How many people would you typically present to in a moot? Overall, do law students have to give any presentations to large crowds or is it just in our small groups? Unfortunately, public speaking is not my strong suit and I wanted to how if I should come prepared or If there would be opportunity to learn these skills at law school. 

It's common for moots to have a panel of three judges. If you advance to final rounds, those rounds are often open to the public and some people will come watch, but other than that, you'd be speaking to three judges and two opposing "counsel".

Although I have to say - mooting would likely be a lot easier if you're comfortable with public speaking. Those three judges aren't just watching, they're engaging with you in conversation deliberately trying to interrupt you. They're probably going to ask you the exact questions you're hoping that they don't ask. 

But not everyone has to moot! And if you do want to moot, you're probably fine.

Edited by beyondsection17
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Everyone has to moot as part of the LRWA course.

But it's only worth a portion of the course so you can always offset weak advocacy skills with strong writing skills. 

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I had the same concern before I started 1L.

My advice would be to force yourself to do at least one extracurricular moot/advocacy competition.  There are many practicing litigators who never thought they wanted to do litigation.

I should also say that you shouldn't be too concerned if you're not good at public speaking.  I have found that success in moots has more to do with preparation (e.g., preparing a thorough binder, anticipating the questions you'll be asked and coming up with responses beforehand, genuinely knowing your shit, etc.) than public speaking skills.  In short, preparation begets confidence, and confidence is key to success.  That said, the best orators (i.e., those who finish at or near the top in moots/competitions) tend to be those who inherently enjoy public speaking.

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29 minutes ago, Rearden said:

I had the same concern before I started 1L.

My advice would be to force yourself to do at least one extracurricular moot/advocacy competition.  There are many practicing litigators who never thought they wanted to do litigation.

I should also say that you shouldn't be too concerned if you're not good at public speaking.  I have found that success in moots has more to do with preparation (e.g., preparing a thorough binder, anticipating the questions you'll be asked and coming up with responses beforehand, genuinely knowing your shit, etc.) than public speaking skills.  In short, preparation begets confidence, and confidence is key to success.  That said, the best orators (i.e., those who finish at or near the top in moots/competitions) tend to be those who inherently enjoy public speaking.

THIS. I 100% agree. You definitely don't need to like public speaking or be a natural to do very well, it's almost all how well you prep and the time you put in knowing the material front and back. I would echo doing a moot before LRWA (you don't have to do like 9 like some people do, but 1, maybe 2 in the fall) to get your feet wet. The advice you'll get back will help a ton, and your Jan term/LRWA moot will seem easy in front of your small group prof after you've done them. Also everyone is pretty much in the same boat... maybe a handful of people are naturals/great speakers but definitely not the majority.

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21 hours ago, Rearden said:

I had the same concern before I started 1L.

My advice would be to force yourself to do at least one extracurricular moot/advocacy competition.  There are many practicing litigators who never thought they wanted to do litigation.

I should also say that you shouldn't be too concerned if you're not good at public speaking.  I have found that success in moots has more to do with preparation (e.g., preparing a thorough binder, anticipating the questions you'll be asked and coming up with responses beforehand, genuinely knowing your shit, etc.) than public speaking skills.  In short, preparation begets confidence, and confidence is key to success.  That said, the best orators (i.e., those who finish at or near the top in moots/competitions) tend to be those who inherently enjoy public speaking.

Yeah, on the other end of the spectrum, I'm pretty comfortable with public speaking/advocacy and I thought I was going to be litigation focused when I came to law school. After doing moots and clinic work I realized it's actually not for me and I was better suited for other things. I'm really, really glad I did the EC stuff to figure that out though.

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I'm not sure if this was already asked in the forum, but does anyone know what the chances of being accepted off of the waitlist are? Is there any way to improve one's chances of being accepted off of the waitlist (i.e. LOCI)?

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On 2017-06-26 at 8:49 PM, awesd said:

How many people would you typically present to in a moot? Overall, do law students have to give any presentations to large crowds or is it just in our small groups? Unfortunately, public speaking is not my strong suit and I wanted to how if I should come prepared or If there would be opportunity to learn these skills at law school. 

I've never been one to shy away from public speaking, but honestly, you'll be so surprised how much you can improve this! I think 99% of people are nervous during their first moot, and if they're not, they should be. Its definitely a learnable skill, and with each one you shed some of the nerves.

With respect to big crowds - no, you don't need to give any big presentations. But there are opportunities if you're looking for them.

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On 2017-06-30 at 7:56 PM, CeliaVaryla said:

I'm not sure if this was already asked in the forum, but does anyone know what the chances of being accepted off of the waitlist are? Is there any way to improve one's chances of being accepted off of the waitlist (i.e. LOCI)?

I couldn't answer concretely, but I'm pretty sure the waitlist is in a set order, and you can't really adjust your position. I believe the only way to get in off the waitlist is if someone rejects or pulls out their acceptance. Good luck.

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any advice for east coast winters? I'll be moving out from the west coast and have never endured anything colder than -5 really..... what sort of things I'll need to buy, where to buy it, and when to buy it. Thanks so much!

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2 hours ago, vanappubc said:

any advice for east coast winters? I'll be moving out from the west coast and have never endured anything colder than -5 really..... what sort of things I'll need to buy, where to buy it, and when to buy it. Thanks so much!

London, ON is on the East Coast now?

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3 hours ago, conge said:

London, ON is on the East Coast now?

My bad... eastern Canada lol. Being from Vancouver we automatically refer to the coasts so it kinda comes automatically even if a city isn't necessarily coastal 

 

Edited by vanappubc

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I've been warned that there are copious amounts of snow in London, so I'd invest in tall-ish boots with good soles. Probably too late to catch sales on those though, so you might have to wait till the stores bring them out again. And any good quality winter jacket will do (ideally from one of the athletic-wear companies), but there's no need for Canada Goose. You will also want a hat, a scarf, and gloves of some kind. This all goes for T.O. too, except we haven't been getting as many large snowfalls the past few years, but sidewalks are still often slippery.

Edited by kiamia
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7 hours ago, vanappubc said:

My bad... eastern Canada lol. Being from Vancouver we automatically refer to the coasts so it kinda comes automatically even if a city isn't necessarily coastal 

 

Dude, that's like me calling Saskatoon the "west coast"; London, ON is about 1400kms from anywhere you could legitimately call the "east coast".

 

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3 hours ago, kiamia said:

I've been warned that there are copious amounts of snow in London, so I'd invest in tall-ish boots with good soles. Probably too late to catch sales on those though, so you might have to wait till the stores bring them out again. And any good quality winter jacket will do (ideally from one of the athletic-wear companies), but there's no need for Canada Goose. You will also want a hat, a scarf, and gloves of some kind. This all goes for T.O. too, except we haven't been getting as many large snowfalls the past few years, but sidewalks are still often slippery.

Do you think I'll need winter tires?

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40 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

Do you think I'll need winter tires?

I don't really drive, but I have friends from both schools of thought (all-season and winter). On the one hand, you probably aren't used to driving on ice/snow. On the other, you're living on campus so it's not as if you NEED to drive every day. In adverse conditions, you can afford to wait for the snow to stop and the streets to be plowed and salted. So if I were you, I'd probably just wait and see. If it gets a iffy even when you're driving slow, then switch. 

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Snow tires are highly recommended if you're going to be driving in the winter in London. It can snow several centimetres a day for several days in a row, maybe over a week sometimes. The city also isn't amazing at plowing/salting super quickly just because so much can come down so regularly.

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Thanks bernard. I should clarify lest I lead anyone astray - I was answering bq's (apparently facetious) question and he's going to be living in the GTA, where plowing/salting happens relatively quickly. But yeah, for London, I'd seriously consider winter tires from the pictures I've seen. 

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