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Quick question: Could anyone confirm that tomorrow is supposed to be business formal? The invitation wasn't terribly clear whether or not tomorrow required a suit and tie (at least, I didn't think "business attire" was unequivocal). Thanks.

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Quick question: Could anyone confirm that tomorrow is supposed to be business formal? The invitation wasn't terribly clear whether or not tomorrow required a suit and tie (at least, I didn't think "business attire" was unequivocal). Thanks.

Someone on the Facebook page confirmed it was suit and tie. So that's what I will be wearing at least

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I am currently struggling to keep up with and understand all of the cases in the readings. Does anyone have any study tips?

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I am currently struggling to keep up with and understand all of the cases in the readings. Does anyone have any study tips?

 

Read your summary* before you do the readings. This way you'll know the point of the case before you start and you'll be able to navigate the reasoning more easily. You also don't have to read every word of every case. That kind of studying will lead to burn out more often than it will lead to an improved understanding of the materials. For some courses it may be appropriate to spend most of your time learning the summary, rather than the readings.

 

*assuming you're taking the path of least resistance and are already relying on the amazing summaries that are floating around/in the 1L dropbox. If you're making your own summaries, well, that might something to reconsider.

 

Alternatively: sleep less, eat quicker, and read faster.

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I am currently struggling to keep up with and understand all of the cases in the readings. Does anyone have any study tips?

 

 

This isn't exactly a study tip.... but don't forget too that you will get much better at reading and understanding the cases through the course of the term. Cases are often written with the assumption that the reader already knows certain things about the law and the legal system. I remember spending ages at the beginning of 1L reading cases and trying to draw inferences to figure out things that I now take for granted. For example, lots of cases are confusing until you have a clear idea of how appellate review works. I can definitely sympathize- readings take forever at the beginning of 1L. That said,  if you stick with it things will probably improve- soon enough you'll know more about the system, have a better sense of the structure legal reasoning and be more familiar with legal terminology. 

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do you run into many students admitted with sub 160 lsats?

I did, so it for sure happens. Also made Dean's List in 1L so don't stress about your LSAT, not really a good indicator of law school performance. 

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Quick question regarding summaries: Do we leave them after the exam or do we take it with us? Also, I've seen some upper years with binded summaries, is this necessary? Where does one get binding done? Would stapling or putting it in a binder do the trick? 

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Quick question regarding summaries: Do we leave them after the exam or do we take it with us?  

No, you take them with you.

 

Also, I've seen some upper years with binded summaries, is this necessary?

It's not necessary, but I liked having them bound -- doing so forced me to stop tinkering with my summary.

 

Where does one get binding done? Would stapling or putting it in a binder do the trick? 

I go to Creative Services in the UCC, but many people use their own binders.  It comes down to personal preference.

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How does the Yamana Sustainability Certificate work in conjunction with your other law courses? Does it mean you will just have a heftier course load having to take earth sciences courses? 

 

How competitive are Pro Bono student placements? And are they performed during the school year in L2+? 

Edited by nouchster95

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How does the Yamana Sustainability Certificate work in conjunction with your other law courses? Does it mean you will just have a heftier course load having to take earth sciences courses? 

 

How competitive are Pro Bono student placements? And are they performed during the school year in L2+? 

 

No idea about the sustainability certificate but as for PBSC yep they're performed during the school year, but they're available to 1Ls as well as 2/3Ls. There are about 20ish projects each year and they mostly all take a few people. I think you can apply to 3 of them so you have relatively good chances of getting 1 but if you apply to really competitive/popular projects it's not a guarantee.

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Hi Western Law students, sorry if this question has already been asked (I didn't want to look through all 11 pages). But I hoping to hear from someone who made the decision to take a year or two off before starting law after undergrad, and why they think this is or isn't a good decision. Any input is appreciated, thanks!

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Hi Western Law students, sorry if this question has already been asked (I didn't want to look through all 11 pages). But I hoping to hear from someone who made the decision to take a year or two off before starting law after undergrad, and why they think this is or isn't a good decision. Any input is appreciated, thanks!

 

Not at Western, but I think anyone in the situation can provide a useful answer for you. I took a few years off after undergrad before applying to law school. I'll be starting in September and feel really good about my decision. 

 

1. Chance to grow up a bit. The difference in my outlook on pretty much everything has changed since leaving school. I think the level of maturity and mental readiness for law school has increased significantly over the last few years away from school. I didn't do anything life changing or anything, but I think I just grew up a bit. It's hard to explain, but I feel more "grown up" - maybe I grew up. Hah. 

 

2. Opportunity to earn some money. You can save up for some cool trips and experiences, which you can later discuss in interviews. You can save up to pay off that expensive law school tuition or previous debts.

 

3. Use the time to create experiences. Get a cool job or volunteer somewhere. Go start a company and (most likely) fail. You'll feel good for trying and you'll definitely learn some cool things along the way. The experience will probably help you stand out during interviews, as there's a ton of K-JD students at law school. 

 

You'll have your own motivations for taking a year or two off, so no one can really give you an idea of whether you should do this or not. Some people are ready for law school at age 20, some aren't ready at age 30. I needed a few years to develop some useful skills and grow, and I couldn't  be happier with my decision. 

Edited by GameTime180
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Been accepted into Queens and Western, trying to develop pros/cons list for both. Graduating from UWaterloo, I've lived off campus in Waterloo and loved it. Things I care about when considering Western: School atmosphere, helpfulness of profs/staff, living arrangements (student housing, transportation), and city life

With that in mind, what would be the 5 things you like best about Western Law, and the 5 things you like least?

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Been accepted into Queens and Western, trying to develop pros/cons list for both. Graduating from UWaterloo, I've lived off campus in Waterloo and loved it. Things I care about when considering Western: School atmosphere, helpfulness of profs/staff, living arrangements (student housing, transportation), and city life

With that in mind, what would be the 5 things you like best about Western Law, and the 5 things you like least?

 

Living arrangements are great - there are a TON of affordable student apartments in London (although I would recommend living DT so you're close to the bars but still a good distance from campus)

You do get a free bus pass w/ your tuition and the system is decent - not as efficient as TTC w/ the subway but it's still gets you from a-b. I drive to school every day but that also has its downside too because parking at the school is a nightmare and half. There are hacks to ensure you always get a spot, though (showing up at certain times/ beating the system w/ certain lots)

London's a great city - it's no Toronto but it has about everything you could need. Nightlife is pretty nice, and there are a ton of great cafes to study at as well as things to do on free time. 

 

In terms of the school itself the atmosphere is great. I've found the profs to be BEYOND helpful in every regard and the staff are lovely. I've met with profs who I've never even had before to ask them for advice on moots / career etc and they're always more than happy to do what they can to support the students. There is a real sense of camaraderie at the school, especially in light of the 22 person small group first year. Tons of clubs to join and the upper years are all extremely welcoming and supportive. There are bi-weekly pub nights that get the entire school out together, and there are always fun events being hosted at the school (w/ more free pizza than you could every imagine). 

 

I chose Western over Queens myself for a number of other reasons, but it all comes down to what the right fit for you is! Helps to visit the schools as well before making a decision. Good luck!

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Been accepted into Queens and Western, trying to develop pros/cons list for both. Graduating from UWaterloo, I've lived off campus in Waterloo and loved it. Things I care about when considering Western: School atmosphere, helpfulness of profs/staff, living arrangements (student housing, transportation), and city life

With that in mind, what would be the 5 things you like best about Western Law, and the 5 things you like least?

 

Congrats on your acceptances! I'm a 1L at western and i love it. 5 things i like best:

1. profs are literally amazing, such good lecturers so class is actually enjoyable and also super helpful and friendly.

2. small groups, it's so easy to make friends starting from the first day.

3. tons of social events.

4. london is super cheap to live in.

5. london is small so it's really easy to get around.

6. i'll just add one more: there are SO many moots/clinics/opportunities to get involved, especially for 1Ls, which not all law schools have.

 

things i like least:

1. i miss toronto.

2. i guess since it's a smaller school compared to osgoode/uoft we don't have as much upper year class selection as they do.

 

that's it.. can't think of 5!

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Hi all! I read through the thread and I don't believe anyone has asked a question similar to mine. I am trying to keep my current job as it pays well and I could use the extra cash/would like to return to it come summer 2018. In order to do so I have to commit to two 12 hours shifts biweekly (can do nights as well). Is this doable? If I did nights I could also get work done as nights tend to be much slower.

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Hi all! I read through the thread and I don't believe anyone has asked a question similar to mine. I am trying to keep my current job as it pays well and I could use the extra cash/would like to return to it come summer 2018. In order to do so I have to commit to two 12 hours shifts biweekly (can do nights as well). Is this doable? If I did nights I could also get work done as nights tend to be much slower.

 

It would depend on your study habits. I think that many law students -- myself included -- would say that taking 24 hours off every two weeks in 1L is manageable.

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Hi all! I read through the thread and I don't believe anyone has asked a question similar to mine. I am trying to keep my current job as it pays well and I could use the extra cash/would like to return to it come summer 2018. In order to do so I have to commit to two 12 hours shifts biweekly (can do nights as well). Is this doable? If I did nights I could also get work done as nights tend to be much slower.

 

I work 15 hours a week for one job - 10 a month for another - am on about 4 clubs and still keep up a high average w/ lots of time for social events! It really just depends on your ability to time manage but it is 100% doable and very helpful to have the extra cash/a job to go back to in the summer!

Only thing i will say is that I do not work during the last couple of weeks in December and April (midterm/exams). Im lucky enough to have a boss that allows me to do that, otherwise it would definitely get hard but hopefully you can work something out! 

Edited by legallyblonde9
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