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Posted (edited)
On 5/14/2018 at 9:42 PM, awesd said:

I need to know whether I'm Bay street or Bloor st. 

This isn't the best way to look at the recruit in my honest opinion. 

Coming off of the cycle and into my 2L summer job now (won't say where but I'm DT toronto), I will say that a decent amount of Dean's List students don't have 2L jobs or didn't get Bay jobs.

Not trying to sound hateful/negative, just more so advising you not to get too cocky in your grades going into the recruit. Grades matter but there are other just as important factors 

Edited by InsertPseudonymHere

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7 hours ago, InsertPseudonymHere said:

This isn't the best way to look at the recruit in my honest opinion. 

Coming off of the cycle and into my 2L summer job now (won't say where but I'm DT toronto), I will say that a decent amount of Dean's List students don't have 2L jobs or didn't get Bay jobs.

Not trying to sound hateful/negative, just more so advising you not to get too cocky in your grades going into the recruit. Grades matter but there are other just as important factors 

What do you think made the difference between you and and the ones that did not get the jobs? (if you don't mind me asking just worried about my own future haha)

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, foreveraloan said:

What do you think made the difference between you and and the ones that did not get the jobs? (if you don't mind me asking just worried about my own future haha)

I think it's hard to pinpoint it exactly. Connections help a ton. You'd be surprised at the amount of people who "know a partner". But there's also just as many if not more who don't.

Being extroverted come recruit time helps a lot as well.

I mean once you get to the OCI, or even in-firm, in my opinion it becomes less about your accomplishments/grades and more about if the firm likes you. Based on that I would say there's an aspect of luck involved, too.

But in sum, grades aren't the be all, end all. There's some B students on Bay after last OCI recruit, there's some B+ students not on Bay.

Edited by InsertPseudonymHere

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Posted (edited)
On 6/10/2018 at 2:39 PM, InsertPseudonymHere said:

This isn't the best way to look at the recruit in my honest opinion. 

Coming off of the cycle and into my 2L summer job now (won't say where but I'm DT toronto), I will say that a decent amount of Dean's List students don't have 2L jobs or didn't get Bay jobs.

Not trying to sound hateful/negative, just more so advising you not to get too cocky in your grades going into the recruit. Grades matter but there are other just as important factors 

 

That's not true. Every dean list student except one in our cohort was hired through the OCI process. But it's true some students with B or lower averages were also hired. All you can really deduce is that the process is a crapshoot. 

Edited by hmyo

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Posted (edited)
On 6/9/2018 at 8:06 PM, student3416 said:

For those who have clinic experience. In regards to the Business Law clinic and CLS, what is the application process like and what do they look for in a candidate? I found an old post from 2010, but I imagine it may be outdated. Thanks!

 

Current CLS supervisor here (can't speak to biz law). 

Not much has changed since 2010, except now the interviews are one-on-one with the supervisor you would be working with. As to what supervisors look for in a candidate (varies from supervisor to supervisor), its less about accolades and more just how about you would 'jive' with that supervisor (since you work directly under them for the entire year, they want to be able to work with you and not hate you). 

To stand out, I would suggest emphasizing an interest in access to justice, on any experience that shows you work well in a group environment, and that you are comfortable with a client facing experience. For example, part of the reason I got the position is that I used to work in the restaurant industry as a server, so my supervisor knew I would be comfortable dealing with difficult clients without being rude or upsetting him/her further. 

Most importantly, the clinic is looking for people who are going to show up and put in the effort. At the end of the day, these are real clients we are serving with real issues that affect their daily lives. Although it is a teaching clinic, people need to understand the clinic is not the same as a regular law school class. 

I would also like to highlight, that if you apply and don't get a position, don't get discouraged. There are plenty of other opportunities to get involved with the clinic either through upper year classes (litigation practice, cla, etc.), or other aspects of the clinic (Dispute Resolution Centre, Pro Bono Students Canada, etc.). 

If you have any other questions, feel free to shoot me a DM. 

Edited by Rebbox

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Posted (edited)
On 6/11/2018 at 11:11 PM, InsertPseudonymHere said:

I think it's hard to pinpoint it exactly. Connections help a ton. You'd be surprised at the amount of people who "know a partner". But there's also just as many if not more who don't.

Being extroverted come recruit time helps a lot as well.

With respect (and in the interests of assuring incoming 1L students with no parents/family friends who are lawyers) I couldn't disagree more on the "connections help a ton" aspect - speaking both from my experience as a student and on the other side (at a firm). I can't think of many/any big firms that will give you an interview based on knowing a partner, and certainly none that will get you hired simply based on knowing a partner. Many, many partners have absolutely nothing to do with recruitment and don't even know the student recruiter well enough (or have enough pull in the firm) to simply say "interview Joe!".

Honestly, in a perverse way connections can hurt you. With the recruitment process you just have to be charming/inoffensive for a 20 minute OCI and 2-6 hours during in-firms; with long-time connections (such as a family friend) you need to have been charming/inoffensive for the years/decades you've known them. This is not to say that a long-term connection would ever give you a bad review - that would be extreme. However, they may only give you a neutral or lukewarm review. And if the recruiter gets a neutral/lukewarm review from someone that has known you for a long time they're going to move on to try and find someone that the firm is excited to interview and/or hire. They have very little information to go on, very little time to make decisions, and literally dozens of candidates that are perfectly pleasant to be around for 20 minute spurts (the length of most interviews), so anything short of "excited" doesn't just not help you, it hurts you.

For my own anecdotal evidence, I had "connections" prior to the recruitment process and I found them to be utterly useless in terms of helping me get interviews or job offers (I never asked for such a favour, but I made the calls to "ask about the firm" because that seemed like the expected thing to do). This was confirmed once I was in a firm and saw how it happens from the inside (and speaking with friends at other firms). I have no doubt that people have examples of their parent's friend being a partner and setting them up with a job, but I would suggest that (a) that would be extremely rare, and (b) often they are probably assuming the fact that they spoke with a partner meant that the partner helped them out, when in reality they did it on their own merits. One last disclaimer: these rules generally get looser as you go down in firm size.

This isn't to say that meeting with partners/associates (either at networking events or through connections) isn't potentially beneficial, but it's beneficial mostly insofar as it helps you to ask questions that help you better understand what the firm is about and what the people are like. But if you're grabbing coffee with a partner/associate, you have to understand that it essentially counts as an interview - and that means you've extended that 2-6 hours of total time you need to fill with charmingness to 2.5-6.5 hours.

However, I couldn't agree more that being extroverted helps those people out a lot during the process.

 

Edited by TheGazeboEffect

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On the other hand, I know for a fact I got OCI's (some of which parlayed into infirms) because of connections. I know because I was told this (obviously they could have lied to me, but hey, I have to accept what I'm told at some point right?)

I don't think there's a one size fit all answer to this. It's going to be your mileage may vary situation. 

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4 hours ago, hmyo said:

On the other hand, I know for a fact I got OCI's (some of which parlayed into infirms) because of connections. I know because I was told this (obviously they could have lied to me, but hey, I have to accept what I'm told at some point right?)

I don't think there's a one size fit all answer to this. It's going to be your mileage may vary situation. 

Yeah there's definitely nuance and exceptions to it (very senior partners probably have this kind of pull), and perhaps my wording was too definitive in the post above (sorry!), but I still think this would be rarer than people realize.

For example, you say you were told that you got an OCI through your connection. I'm guessing that you, through family or whatever, knew a partner and they said they got you an OCI. However, the reality of the situation is likely that they reached at to the firm's recruitment coordinator and put in a good word for you - you still could easily have been not OCI'd and still had to be evaluated on your merits. Because you got the OCI they say that they "got you" the OCI, which makes it seem like they locked it in for you when in reality they did no such thing. It could have gone the other way and in that case they would've said "sorry, I put in a good word for you but no luck". In this sense it's sort of like a confirmation bias or something.

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On 6/9/2018 at 8:06 PM, student3416 said:

For those who have clinic experience. In regards to the Business Law clinic and CLS, what is the application process like and what do they look for in a candidate? I found an old post from 2010, but I imagine it may be outdated. Thanks!

Was a 1L Caseworker in Bus Law this year; don't know what this year's directors are looking for specifically but they really just want to see if you can do the work and represent yourself well in front of a client. Business experience also not necessary. One of the case workers came from an Arts and Humanities program (Also helps that she's one of the top students in the grade) and did well iirc. 

Also be sure to have a variety of experience, and be likeable when you get an interview.

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21 minutes ago, TheGazeboEffect said:

Yeah there's definitely nuance and exceptions to it (very senior partners probably have this kind of pull), and perhaps my wording was too definitive in the post above (sorry!), but I still think this would be rarer than people realize.

For example, you say you were told that you got an OCI through your connection. I'm guessing that you, through family or whatever, knew a partner and they said they got you an OCI. However, the reality of the situation is likely that they reached at to the firm's recruitment coordinator and put in a good word for you - you still could easily have been not OCI'd and still had to be evaluated on your merits. Because you got the OCI they say that they "got you" the OCI, which makes it seem like they locked it in for you when in reality they did no such thing. It could have gone the other way and in that case they would've said "sorry, I put in a good word for you but no luck". In this sense it's sort of like a confirmation bias or something.

 

Oh definitely - i don't think there's a science to it at all. I just think, like a law exam, there's one answer, and then there's the in the alternative answer. Just live your best life and see where that takes you. You can only control what you can control. Your marks are what they are, so spend the most time that you can do work on your apps. Qualify of your apps definitely matter. 

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Does anyone know when/how do we inform the admin of which we prefer to take - corporate or ethics - in first year?

Thanks 

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10 hours ago, Flawgical said:

Does anyone know when/how do we inform the admin of which we prefer to take - corporate or ethics - in first year?

Thanks 

I'm pretty sure we pick it sometime during first semester because no matter which we take it'll be in second semester.

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Correct - you will be linked to an online form (kind of like the ones where you submit assignments) and then you choose which one you take. Admin will guide you through the entire process not to worry. There's no pre-selection of courses required for 1L unlike undergrad. 

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Incoming 1L here! I have a question about orientation week. As a woman, will it be necessary to have some sort of suit this early on? Or is that only necessary later (for job interviews etc.). If there are any ladies out there who can speak to this at Western specifically, that would be great! 

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Posted (edited)

Can anyone speak to 565 talbot st? 

Also, for ladies, is a blazer and a pencil skirt passable for formal events or does it have to be a pants suit? 

Thanks :) 

Edited by Iwantajd

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On 7/21/2018 at 12:13 PM, ihavelawquestions said:

Incoming 1L here! I have a question about orientation week. As a woman, will it be necessary to have some sort of suit this early on? Or is that only necessary later (for job interviews etc.). If there are any ladies out there who can speak to this at Western specifically, that would be great! 

The first day of orientation will have the opening ceremonies, during which the Dean will address the incoming 1L class and you will take an oath of professionalism (or something to that effect). Last year all of my fellow classmates wore a suit. I would recommend bringing a suit, and doing the same.

I would highly recommend getting a 2-piece or 3-piece suit. It will be useful to have during 1L, and beyond. I'm not suggesting going and spending a lot of money. However, something that looks like a suit and not separates will make you seem more polished and professional. For reference, I have a 3-piece  suit and I wear the skirt and pants interchangeably with the blazer.

If you have further questions, I would recommend posting in the Western Law Class of 2021 Facebook group. The upper year students are a really great resource, and they tend to respond faster there. 

 

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3 hours ago, BBAtoJD said:

The first day of orientation will have the opening ceremonies, during which the Dean will address the incoming 1L class and you will take an oath of professionalism (or something to that effect). Last year all of my fellow classmates wore a suit. I would recommend bringing a suit, and doing the same.

I would highly recommend getting a 2-piece or 3-piece suit. It will be useful to have during 1L, and beyond. I'm not suggesting going and spending a lot of money. However, something that looks like a suit and not separates will make you seem more polished and professional. For reference, I have a 3-piece  suit and I wear the skirt and pants interchangeably with the blazer.

If you have further questions, I would recommend posting in the Western Law Class of 2021 Facebook group. The upper year students are a really great resource, and they tend to respond faster there. 

 

Not gonna post this on the Class of 2021 group because I'll feel silly.... but... is there food at the opening ceremonies? If so, is it good?

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, student3416 said:

Not gonna post this on the Class of 2021 group because I'll feel silly.... but... is there food at the opening ceremonies? If so, is it good?

I like you already, think we'll get along! For $24k a year I expect caviar. But seriously, I doubt they'll cheap out on food--though there might be appetizers or finger food as opposed to meals depending on the event type I presume.

Edited by georgecostanzajr

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10 hours ago, student3416 said:

Not gonna post this on the Class of 2021 group because I'll feel silly.... but... is there food at the opening ceremonies? If so, is it good?

 

4 hours ago, georgecostanzajr said:

I like you already, think we'll get along! For $24k a year I expect caviar. But seriously, I doubt they'll cheap out on food--though there might be appetizers or finger food as opposed to meals depending on the event type I presume.

There was no food in my year - 2016. 

You sit and listen to some speeches. Every student is invited to walk onstage and is introduced one by one. You then all sign a pledge of professionalism. Then you break off into your orientation activities. Your small group will have a get-together at a restaurant. Some small groups had budget to buy a small appetizer to share. Some did not. Prepare to pay for your own meal. 

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Posted (edited)
20 hours ago, student3416 said:

Not gonna post this on the Class of 2021 group because I'll feel silly.... but... is there food at the opening ceremonies? If so, is it good?

Western changed the way the professionalism ceremony is run last year (my year). You don't get invited onto the stage or introduced individually anymore!!

The ceremony last year consisted of a motivational speech (or two), and the Dean's welcome. There is also a pledge, during which students are asked to stand where they are sitting and repeat after the Dean.

If I remember correctly, the lunch was a really good stir fry (pretty sure I went up for seconds even though no one else did). There was also salad, bread, desserts, pop, water, tea, coffee.

Note: the lunch was included

Edited by BBAtoJD

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