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jkic2003

Toronto 2016-2017 Articling Application Thread

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You should email the evening you interviewed.

I'm a candidate in this year's articling recruit, so I can't speak as an interviewer/recruiter. But I can say that not all employers are unhappy to accept thank-you correspondence the day after one's interview. (Sorry for the double negative.) Obviously, the sooner the better, though (after a reasonable amount of time to write the message).

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I'm a candidate in this year's articling recruit, so I can't speak as an interviewer/recruiter. But I can say that not all employers are unhappy to accept thank-you correspondence the day after one's interview. (Sorry for the double negative.) Obviously, the sooner the better, though (after a reasonable amount of time to write the message).

I thought it would be best to wait a day, to remind them of you, I guess. Oh well, better than nothing I suppose. 

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I'm a candidate in this year's articling recruit, so I can't speak as an interviewer/recruiter. But I can say that not all employers are unhappy to accept thank-you correspondence the day after one's interview. (Sorry for the double negative.) Obviously, the sooner the better, though (after a reasonable amount of time to write the message).

 

If you were really sorry you wouldn't have done it in the first place...Does this mean that at least one/some/most employer(s) are happy to accept thank yous? If so, it would not seem groundbreaking that 100% of employers are not unhappy to to receive a pleasant message thanking them for their time. In any event, what is your evidence of this- because at this point it's just conjecture. Furthermore, I am annoying. 

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If you were really sorry you wouldn't have done it in the first place...Does this mean that at least one/some/most employer(s) are happy to accept thank yous? If so, it would not seem groundbreaking that 100% of employers are not unhappy to to receive a pleasant message thanking them for their time. In any event, what is your evidence of this- because at this point it's just conjecture. Furthermore, I am annoying. 

 

I think braintree's saying that at least in some cases it's ok to send a thank-you e-mail the day after because those employers wouldn't mind receiving it the day after the interview (i.e. wouldn't think it's too late). So it's not the end of the world if you don't send a thank-you e-mail the day of. 

 

Also,

If so, it would not seem groundbreaking that 100% of employers are not unhappy to to receive a pleasant message thanking them for their time

Edited by Lawl
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does anyone know if employers are going to call after 5pm on Wednesday to say thanks but no thanks?? 

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does anyone know if employers are going to call after 5pm on Wednesday to say thanks but no thanks??

I know of at least one firm that's indicated that they'll call their top 2 candidates for the 2 positions they have available, but also call candidates 3 and 4 to let them know that they're on the firm's mind if the first 2 accept elsewhere. I suppose that's similar to a "thanks but no thanks" situation and I wouldn't be thrilled to have that happen.

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My work does that too if students don't immediately accept.

 

It's so that if Candidate 1 or 2 reject the offer, maybe 3 or 4 will want to work with us enough they'd be willing to hold  any offers they have for a confirmation from us. Apparently in the past, by the time Candidate 1 firmly rejects the offer, candidates 3-8 had already accepted offers elsewhere.

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Does anyone know if potential employers will be calling references today? Or are references called after offers are extended? I'm specifically curious about M.A.G.

Edited by Regina Phalange

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Two things I wanted to mention now that I'm on the other side of the table (i.e. an articling student).

 

On the day of the first interviews, one of our candidates cancelled and the person coordinating the interviews then phoned the top candidate to whom we couldn't give an interview offer. That person scheduled an interview for a few hours later and from what I understand, received a second round interview after a strong performance in the first interview. Just goes to show you, that once you get that interview, everyone's probably on equal footing with regards to getting the job.

 

My work email spam filter has swallowed up an interviewee's thank you email. That is, I can see that they sent me an email with the subject line "Thank You" but I can't open it. Apparently this has happened to other, more busy people at my firm. So although I was able to track down the person's email and send an email explaining all of this, the more busy lawyers probably wouldn't have time to figure this all out. Basically, what I'm trying to say is try not to overreact to whether (and to what extent) a person has replied to one of your thank you emails. Uriel has written about this subject somewhere previously (I can't find the link but if someone else can, that'd be awesome). It's hard to analyze what's going through a person's head when they send a thank you email. Plus, as was the case with me, it could just be that the person's work email won't let them access your email :(

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Does anyone know if potential employers will be calling references today? Or are references called after offers are extended? I'm specifically curious about M.A.G.

If they check at all, they will call references before making an offer of employment.

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^ I don't think that's something anyone will be able to measure unless they work at the firm in question. Sorry I couldn't be of more help

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^ I don't think that's something anyone will be able to measure unless they work at the firm in question. Sorry I couldn't be of more help

No problem, I realized it was a pretty dumb question. 

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No problem, I realized it was a pretty dumb question. 

 

Not a dumb question, just difficult to predict these kinds of things, that's all. It's okay to be concerned and look into details to try to ease some of your worries.

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I'm waiting for a call also so stressful, i couldn't sleep much last night and haven't had food all day just waiting for the call. I'm hoping they call everyone today so i find out. They just told me they will start making calls 5pm eastern time.

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Good luck everyone! If you don't hear from a firm that you thought you might hear from, and wanted to hear from, don't hesitate to call them around 5:20 and ask if their positions have been filled. You may be first on their wait list and they might be waiting to hear back from someone they offered a position.

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