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Louiemoonlight

Paralegal study/degree as hobby or possible 2nd career

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Hi all, I am so glad I found this forum. I have been always interested in Laws field of knowledge although I had Bachelor degree in Eng. and currently work as Finance in Corporate world. Also I am at the beginning of 40 y/o, however I wonder if I want to get degree as Paralegal and study part-time or online, where I shall go? I am located in Toronto.

 

Also am I too old to pursue the extra study of Paralegals at current stage, I have plenty of spare time after work by the way.

 

Thanks in advance.

Edited by Louiemoonlight

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Canadian Business College and Herzing College both offer evening courses (starting at 6pm) for the one year paralegal studies program. I believe Everest shut down but I'm sure there are others in the area. I know that Herzing's classes are from Mon-Thurs and, if memory serves me right, CBC runs from Mon-Fri. Several people from my firm attended these private schools after work and received their licenses after passing the LSUC paralegal exam. I believe they both have payment plans and/or financial aid and should run somewhere close to $15k for the whole year including books.

 

You will also find plenty of people around your age attending these classes, so no, it's never too late.

 

I suggest doing some research into the different schools to figure out which ones best meets your situation, as I'm sure location and costs should be factored into your decision along with everything else.

 

Also, keep in mind that paralegals in Ontario are required to pay annual fees and such in order to maintain their licenses so it may be a waste if you are just considering further education but no intention to practice down the road (although the costs are lower for those who are not practicing).

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Hi all, I am so glad I found this forum. I have been always interested in Laws field of knowledge although I had Bachelor degree in Eng. and currently work as Finance in Corporate world. Also I am at the beginning of 40 y/o, however I wonder if I want to get degree as Paralegal and study part-time or online, where I shall go? I am located in Toronto.

 

Also am I too old to pursue the extra study of Paralegals at current stage, I have plenty of spare time after work by the way.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Canadian Business College and Herzing College both offer evening courses (starting at 6pm) for the one year paralegal studies program. I believe Everest shut down but I'm sure there are others in the area. I know that Herzing's classes are from Mon-Thurs and, if memory serves me right, CBC runs from Mon-Fri. Several people from my firm attended these private schools after work and received their licenses after passing the LSUC paralegal exam. I believe they both have payment plans and/or financial aid and should run somewhere close to $15k for the whole year including books.

 

You will also find plenty of people around your age attending these classes, so no, it's never too late.

 

I suggest doing some research into the different schools to figure out which ones best meets your situation, as I'm sure location and costs should be factored into your decision along with everything else.

 

Also, keep in mind that paralegals in Ontario are required to pay annual fees and such in order to maintain their licenses so it may be a waste if you are just considering further education but no intention to practice down the road (although the costs are lower for those who are not practicing).

 

 

15k for the whole year is crazy expensive.  I recommend you go to a public institution as they tend to be cheaper and more reputable.  Seneca for example.

 

Tuition for 2 semesters: $3,645

Books and supplies for 2 semesters: $1,325

 

 

There are a total of 4 semesters.  Part-time is also available. 

 

http://www.senecacollege.ca/fulltime/PLE.html#fees

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15k for the whole year is crazy expensive. I recommend you go to a public institution as they tend to be cheaper and more reputable. Seneca for example.

 

Tuition for 2 semesters: $3,645

Books and supplies for 2 semesters: $1,325

 

There are a total of 4 semesters. Part-time is also available.

http://www.senecacollege.ca/fulltime/PLE.html#fees

Ah, I did not know public colleges offer the part-time program too. Perhaps I should have mentioned that most of my colleagues went the private-college (and thus more expensive) route for the purpose of the expedited course and license.

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I would like to revive this topic to ask a similar question.

I have a day job that pays the bills but also leaves me with a fair bit of free time, which I would like to find a meaningful way to fill. I have no intention of leaving my job, so law school is out of the question, but I have a deep interest in the law and am considering a part-time career as a paralegal.

My question for those on here who have experience in the field is, will I be likely to find work or will I be wasting my time? My goal would be to start a solo practice once I have obtained enough experience. I would be willing to do plenty of volunteer, pro bono work, etc. to gain experience.

I live in the GTA and I believe my areas of interest would be employment law, human rights law, or LTB. I normally work 5 days on 4 off, and on work days I still have a few hours free. Not too worried about the financial aspect here; I’m fine with taking a bit of a loss for the first few years, and after that I’m happy if my practice pays for itself plus a little extra.

Thank you in advance for taking the time.

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