Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
ljlife

Best pre-law Arts majors?

Recommended Posts

In your opinion, what are the best Arts majors that prepare you for law school? I plan on doing political science but I'm debating between philosophy, history and economics as my 2nd major (I find all three interesting so i can't decide, leaning towards philosophy at the moment). Also, if someone does 1 major and 3 minors, do you think that law schools will look at them negatively because they didn't do 2 majors or honours? Ideally, I'd love to do a major in political science, minor in history, minor in philosophy and a minor in french, but I'm afraid that it will look like I slacked off.

 

By the way, I'm the one who posted the McGill vs Concordia undergrad question a while ago and if anyone is wondering....I chose McGill. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They don't care, study what you're interested in.

 

Only one thought, you know the old line about a little knowledge being a dangerous thing?  Far better to get a deep knowledge of one or two particular areas then to end up with a superficial knowledge of 3 or 4.  Take a wide variety of courses in first year (because, hey, you don't know what you're interested in), narrow it down in second year and upper years.  Using myself as an example, I started doing a degree in poli-sci, but took economics, history and some other courses in first year.  By second year, I was doing an economics degree with a history minor, and by third year it was mostly economics (principally because the economics department offered more interesting history courses than the history department, although I took a spattering of philosophy courses in 3rd and 4th year which turned out to be very valuable).  Nobody actually cares what your majors/minors are, a degree's a degree, but its just more intellectually satisfying to come away from undergrad with a deep understanding of something. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can achieve the same grades doing a major vs. honours, do honours. If your grades will suffer, do a major with 1 or 2 minors. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish I'd spent my undergrad learning a new language.

 

I plan to minor in french to become perfect at the language... I think it's a good idea, especially since I plan to apply to McGill and civil law schools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my opinion, economics would be the most useful (in real life) of the three 2nd majors you're deciding between.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It doesn't really matter but something where you have to do a lot of writing and reading may help. If your university has a strong program in an area with good job prospects that might help too (if you choose not to go straight to law school and work for a bit). 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would approach it as follows:

1) Pick something you are interested in (which you seem to feel equally about them so far)

2) Pick something employable

 

The first is because you will need good grades, and it is easier to learn a subject you are interested in.  The second is because the majority of people who apply do not get into law school.  You may even find in 4 years the idea of law school (or more school in general) is the last thing you want.  So it is good to put yourself in a position where you will be employable after undergrad.

 

Edit: For number 2 I should add I have no real input on what degrees are "employable."  Lots of people are in jobs that the only requirement was any degree, so it isn't a clear definition.  I imagine becoming fluent in French would greatly benefit you.  Opens up a lot of doors in many areas.

Edited by TKNumber3
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Edit: For number 2 I should add I have no real input on what degrees are "employable."  Lots of people are in jobs that the only requirement was any degree, so it isn't a clear definition.  I imagine becoming fluent in French would greatly benefit you.  Opens up a lot of doors in many areas.

Someone linked this earlier, it's good http://cou.on.ca/publications/reports/pdfs/cou-gradsurvey_nov2013-final-final-s

double major in forestry/theology, be a druid, 100% employment rate

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would probably do poli sci and economics if I were you, not just for law but general knowledge as well(economics can be very useful)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meh, if I had to do it all over again, it would either be Communication Studies (again), Psych/Linguistics (audiology or OT), or Industrial Relations (labour field). Look into the industrial relations courses at McGill. It's a small department, and is a mix of business and arts classes.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They don't care, study what you're interested in.

 

Only one thought, you know the old line about a little knowledge being a dangerous thing?  Far better to get a deep knowledge of one or two particular areas then to end up with a superficial knowledge of 3 or 4.  Take a wide variety of courses in first year (because, hey, you don't know what you're interested in), narrow it down in second year and upper years.  Using myself as an example, I started doing a degree in poli-sci, but took economics, history and some other courses in first year.  By second year, I was doing an economics degree with a history minor, and by third year it was mostly economics (principally because the economics department offered more interesting history courses than the history department, although I took a spattering of philosophy courses in 3rd and 4th year which turned out to be very valuable).  Nobody actually cares what your majors/minors are, a degree's a degree, but its just more intellectually satisfying to come away from undergrad with a deep understanding of something. 

I take an issue with the idea that an undergraduate degree in an arts program will leave you with "deep knowledge."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I take an issue with the idea that an undergraduate degree in an arts program will leave you with "deep knowledge."

Knowledge is communities in the Ozarks, it's all relative. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In your opinion, what are the best Arts majors that prepare you for law school? I plan on doing political science but I'm debating between philosophy, history and economics as my 2nd major (I find all three interesting so i can't decide, leaning towards philosophy at the moment). Also, if someone does 1 major and 3 minors, do you think that law schools will look at them negatively because they didn't do 2 majors or honours? Ideally, I'd love to do a major in political science, minor in history, minor in philosophy and a minor in french, but I'm afraid that it will look like I slacked off.

 

By the way, I'm the one who posted the McGill vs Concordia undergrad question a while ago and if anyone is wondering....I chose McGill. 

 

The one that gets you a decent paying job if you don't get into law school (the majority of applicants don't). 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ I don't think there is a BA that ensures a decent paying job is there?

Certainly any motivated BA holder can get a decent paying job, but it would not be as a result of their specific degree area.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Economics is the most employable arts degree but only do it if you're good at math.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe in BC that the theatre design / production BAs have remarkably high employment rates (for arts degrees, in their chosen field).

Edited by kurrika

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone's already said it, I'll just say it again in eye-ache-inducing bold font.

 

With the exception of specialized degrees like engineering, most undergraduate degrees will not get you a good job, no matter how impressive the title of the course or difficult the content. It's the great lie the establishment told our generation. It's a well-meaning lie, because for our parents it was true, but it's a lie nonetheless.

 

Most jobs either don't require an undergrad degree, or require an undergrad plus something else. That's why if you're in undergrad, it's absolutely essential that you know why you're there. If you're there for the love of knowledge, take whatever the hell you want. If you're there to get a job, figure out the kind of job you want immediately. If you don't know what you want, take "love of knowledge" courses and think about it for awhile or even better drop out and get some life experience and think about it for awhile. This is important because unless you're fine spending time and money on a long, open-ended journey of discovery (and nothing's wrong with that), you should be planning your undergrad by working backwards from the actual requirements of the kind of job you want, that you took the time to research to the courses you should be taking. My own mistakes deserve italics.

 

Which brings us to law school. If you're planning to go to law school, take easy courses where you'll get high marks. That's it, that's all. Don't overthink it. The vast majority of law schools do not care what you took in undergrad.

 

If you're afraid the easy courses will disqualify you from the other thing you might want to do in four years, put some serious effort into figuring out what that other thing is and make sure the harder courses you're going to take are actually a prereq for doing the other thing. Because the dumbest thing you can do if the goal is law school is take difficult courses that you don't enjoy that still won't qualify you for jack shit. I put most poli sci, philosophy, economics, and general science classes in that category.

Edited by alcatraz
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • Who else is in the Programme de droit canadien? Feel free to message me! We are a small program and I would like to get to know my fellow classmates ☺️
    • I realize I wrote Public Law; I meant foundations of Canadian Law! ***
    • Hi Northstar, not sure if this will be a help or not, I largely relied on commercially available notes for the exam.  Found it easier to reference then the texts on the big day, but that is subjective to me I suppose. I found most of my colleagues from law school were doing the same. I did read everything on the syllabus unless it said it was supplementary: Texts, judgements, articles (although I only remember Articles on the syllabus for Public Law).  I don’t recommend not getting the texts because anything in the textbook is free game and it is hard to know what another person’s notes may have omitted I personally found Consitutional and Admin to be the most time consuming (ie. the most material to get through) of the five.  PR was very easy to get through. I also found Public Law to be a great place to start.  I see many NCA grads recommend starting with Public, Const and Admin. I wrote mine in 4 sittings (I wrote 7 exams) pre-Covid as I was juggling a job on the side to pay the bills.  Everyone is different.  If you feel like you can juggle 5 syllabi by all means.  Most of my friends wrote 2-3 per sitting.  But of course these circumstances are different. Best of luck, feel free to PM or comment on this if you have any other questions.    
    • Does anyone know if the class size is full or when an update may be happening 
    • Thanks for the insight! It seems they say there is time off to complete CPLED requirements but I'm thinking it is closer to what you said and that its just "on paper". Do you remember how many hours you spent on each assignment? I'm thinking blocking off 1-2hrs per day should be more than sufficient but I've also heard that some students spend over 8hrs per assignment to get things perfect, then again it does depend on the individual so I don't actually know. Overall it just seems very time consuming more than anything. Thank you for being candid about the salary, I'm happy to say that it was not too far off from what you were being paid but I understand that the market is very slow so they probably reduced the number. I was very lucky to have found this position, I've also been searching for several months since completing my NCA requirements so I know how tough it is. Sending you lots of positive energy and good luck! I'm sure you will find something eventually, it really is unfortunate that your firm couldn't keep you.  

×
×
  • Create New...