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So hockey and rugby but no basketball or baseball... Guess my sports aren't represented !

I don't think there is any baseball outside of a one-time softball tournament, but I do believe there is a basketball intermural team. There are a handful of intermural sports that aren't on that list.

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I don't think there is any baseball outside of a one-time softball tournament, but I do believe there is a basketball intermural team. There are a handful of intermural sports that aren't on that list.

Sweet! I'll be doing that then!

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Could anybody speak to ways to get more involved in administrative law throughout law school? Related extracirriculars/clubs, perhaps?

Edited by Buick

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Could anybody speak to ways to get more involved in administrative law throughout law school? Related extracirriculars/clubs, perhaps?

 

The Laskin is an admin law moot competition, so you can go out for that. There's also an internship with the Alberta Utilities Commission for course credit, and I think they're also introducing an intership with the Human Rights Commission.

 

I think the Environmental Law Club had a speaker for environmental law in the regulatory context. There's also a fair amount of overlap between Aboriginal and admin, but I'm not sure if any of the Aboriginal Club speakers focused on that (although if you become part of the exec you may be able to help guide the direction moving forward). 

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By the way, here is a book that might be interesting to read right before starting law school. It is:

 

So, You Want to Be a Lawyer, Eh? Law School in Canada, 2nd Edition Paperback – Oct 1 2007
by Adam Letourneau (Author)

 

“The competition is even fiercer when applying for a law job. Adam Letourneau, B.Sc., B.A., LL.B., 2005 graduate of the University of Alberta Faculty of Law, former Editor-in-Chief of the Alberta Law Review and owner of Letourneau Law, Barristers & Solicitors, reveals in this 2nd Edition many insider tips on how to gain admittance to law school in Canada, how to cope and succeed in law school, and most importantly, how to land a coveted law job post-graduation. Drawing upon personal experience and the experiences of numerous Canadian law school graduates, Letourneau shares insights on the LSAT, applying for law school, study strategies, summer jobs, the articling application process and much more. Letourneau will save you hours of research, hours of study and tons of stress. Including new law school graduate comments, updated admissions information, what being a lawyer is like, salary updates and more.”

 

It’s interesting because it was written from the perspective and experiences of a U of A Law grad.

The only catch is that the book is a few years old now, thus some of the information will be a bit dated. But most of the information/advice is timeless and still applies.

Edited by StudentLife
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I am slightly disappointed in the emphasis on sports, especially hockey and rugby. Don't get me wrong, sports are important and a diverse array of interests is ideal in society. But I was hoping that the "locker room advantage" wouldn't follow me to law school, where an upper-hand is based on the skill on ice rather than academic merit.

 

What's the student body like in U of A?

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I am slightly disappointed in the emphasis on sports, especially hockey and rugby. Don't get me wrong, sports are important and a diverse array of interests is ideal in society. But I was hoping that the "locker room advantage" wouldn't follow me to law school, where an upper-hand is based on the skill on ice rather than academic merit.

 

What's the student body like in U of A?

 

I think you may be slightly misunderstanding what I think a few people are getting at. It's not that skill on the ice rather than academic merit gives you an upper hand. The reality is, in the first few months of law school, very few other clubs give you the same opportunity to get to know other law students outside of class. For 1L hiring (not so much after), it helps knowing upper years that have been through the hiring process before. It also shows firms that you're getting engaged in the student body and it give you something to talk about at your interview. 

 

You don't have to be exceptional at any sport, or even play if you don't want to. Get involved somehow and get to know people, that's the main point. Academic merit always matters, but we're going into a profession where you deal with people and your connections in law school transition right into your work, there's no getting around it. 

Edited by Workingaway

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I didn’t see an emphasis on sports. There are limited intramurals and some one-off sporting events such as the golf, softball, and curling events. Rugby and hockey are more like between an intramural team and a law sports club. Sure you can meet people though any of those activities, but the same goes for any other activity.

 

Then there is a separate category we will call college level sports. If you are passionate about a life-long sport such as hockey and have played at the elite level, college level, semi-professionally or whatever, then yeah for sure some firms will preferentially select people for interviews almost based on that factor alone. For some reason the elite level athletes tend to be picked up by the Calgary corporate firms.

 

1L hiring is a crapshoot but the interviews (except for government) are so brief, informal, and basic, that it doesn’t matter who you know or what you know, unless of course you happen to already know one of the student hiring committee partners or associates! But that wouldn’t be from law school sports. But you might talk about sports at the interview. 

 

Beware, there are also “BRO” firms with predominantly male while middle-aged partners who tend to prefer people interested in some of the same things they are, such as sports and hockey.

 

For articling searches, it absolutely matters who you know and who knows you, because by then it’s mostly about reputation, networking, and people recommending or not recommending you. There are always exceptions though.

 

Also, the majority of people in law school don’t do sports beyond the occasional recreational event. Most do get involved in SLS or Law Show though, not that you have to. There are many other clubs and activities as well. And you can always start your own club.

Edited by StudentLife

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I am slightly disappointed in the emphasis on sports, especially hockey and rugby. Don't get me wrong, sports are important and a diverse array of interests is ideal in society. But I was hoping that the "locker room advantage" wouldn't follow me to law school, where an upper-hand is based on the skill on ice rather than academic merit.

 

What's the student body like in U of A?

 

 

One firm I interviewed with had a very "sport are important" feel to them. But there are plenty who don't give a hoot. 

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Sports are good for interviews because they are easy to talk about and are relatable. It's less of a requirement and more of an easy way to have a conversation where you can get a feel for a person. If you have hobbies or interests that you are able to talk about it is basically the same thing, unless you list your hobbies as extremely generic like reading or travel.

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I'll be almost 30 years old when school starts in September, and I've been wondering to what degree (if any) I'll stand out from the rest of the incoming class for that reason. I mean, I'm not really old enough to be a "mature" student, but neither am I a 22-23 year old fresh out of undergraduate.

No worries ... I'm about 10 years past that!

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^ At U of C not that many people did something like rugby. Generally just SLA/SLS or PBSC is enough if you put in the effort. I don't think rugby or law show made any difference in terms of who got jobs at U of C. Maybe it's just this year though.

 

Sorry, trying to catch up. What are 'SLA/ SLS' and 'PBSC'? Thanks!

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If I remember correctly, OCIs can be juggled between all three cities, but actual in-firms take place at the same time (at the very least Calgary and Edmonton were the same couple of days).  So you could apply broadly, then make you decision following OCIs based on where you get interviews/how you feel about firms.

There are some multi-city firms. I know what was originally Fraser Milner Cosgrain is now connected to Dentons and has branches in Calgary, Edmonton, and Vancouver, not to mention worldwide.

 

(Please note I am not yet a law student - accepted for 2016-2017 - but I do have some minimal interactive experience with a few firms through work!)

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^^ This brings up a question I had about applying for summer jobs and articling.

I will be attending UofA, and my preferences in terms of summer jobs/articling (in descending order) are Vancouver, Calgary and Edmonton.

 

I know my chances are limited in Vancouver and probably my best chances are in Edmonton. So that being the case, would I be able to apply to all 3 cities and decide based on acceptances? Or will firms know that I am pursuing multiple cities and therefore black ball me as a candidate to all of them?

I.e. will I need to pick a city of focus and only apply and interview with firms from that city.

Sorry - this is the post I was attempting to address. I wanted to suggest that you could inquire with a firm like Fraser Milner Cosgrain, which is now associated with Dentons. I have no idea what they are like to work with - my only experience, actually, was to hire one of their lawyers to deal with CRA for me. Dentons has branches in several cities Canada-wide and world-wide, so they may not be as concerned about flight risks.

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Sorry - this is the post I was attempting to address. I wanted to suggest that you could inquire with a firm like Fraser Milner Cosgrain, which is now associated with Dentons. I have no idea what they are like to work with - my only experience, actually, was to hire one of their lawyers to deal with CRA for me. Dentons has branches in several cities Canada-wide and world-wide, so they may not be as concerned about flight risks.

 

The thread has been dormant for almost a year, so you may not get many responses. Also, there is a "multiquote" function you can use to respond to multiple posts. 

 

As far as getting hired into the big firms with offices in multiple cities, note that while these firms share a name hiring decisions are made at a local office level. So you apply to the firm in the city you want to work in, you don't apply to the firm, and then if offered a job decide which city to work in.

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Sorry, trying to catch up. What are 'SLA/ SLS' and 'PBSC'? Thanks!

 

SLS stands for Student Legal Services, and is U of A Law's student run clinic. Any law student can volunteer, and they offer full-time summer jobs.  The students who work there in the summer become the shift leaders the next year.  The criminal section volunteers take on clients, help them with charges, and make court appearances on their behalf.  I think the civil side involved a lot of walk in and calls where you direct them to other services and help them figure out generally what the next steps are.  They can take on cases, but I think there are a lot less. In criminal you can essentially take on as many files as you want, whereas in civil I there are lots of people don't get any ongoing cases.  There's also an education/outreach section where you essentially set up in a variety of places and answer any questions people have.

 

I think SLA is U of C's equivalent to SLS, but I'm not sure.

 

PBSC is Pro Bono Students Canada, and is also associated with SLS. They have research projects that they help with, and I think PBSC also assists duty counsel at the courts. Duty counsel are volunteer lawyers who take 30 minute interview/meetings with self-reps to help them through the court process.

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The thread has been dormant for almost a year, so you may not get many responses. Also, there is a "multiquote" function you can use to respond to multiple posts. 

 

As far as getting hired into the big firms with offices in multiple cities, note that while these firms share a name hiring decisions are made at a local office level. So you apply to the firm in the city you want to work in, you don't apply to the firm, and then if offered a job decide which city to work in.

 

 

Just to add to this: you will be working against yourself by interviewing in one city and mentioning that you would like to work in one of their other branches. Lots of firms in Edmonton are looking to hire future partners and not just summers/juniors. So i wouldn't even mention wanting to work in another city "some day". 

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I'm in 1L as well and since I'm currently procrastinating I thought I'd chime in and offer to answer questions. I'm also working at a big firm in Calgary for the summer, so I might be able to answer some some job search related questions. 

 

Just to address the question regarding the major factors in getting a job in 1L, I don't think it's quite as mark heavy as Darknight mentioned. Almost none of the firms I interviewed with asked me for my midterm grades. That being said, my marks from my undergrad were high and they saw those. 

Agreed on the job factors. I had a 1L summer job, now have a 2L summer job and have an article already. My average in first year was 2.8 and second year a 2.9 (My undergrad GPA was a 4.0, but I don't think that had a big impact at all). The only mark firms saw in my first year during interviews was a C in foundations, they didn't even ask about midterm marks.

 

What factors mattered? Work experience pre-law school, volunteer experience outside of the ordinary SLS that everyone does, PERSONALITY/FIT and busting my ass to get what I wanted.

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Agreed on the job factors. I had a 1L summer job, now have a 2L summer job and have an article already. My average in first year was 2.8 and second year a 2.9 (My undergrad GPA was a 4.0, but I don't think that had a big impact at all). The only mark firms saw in my first year during interviews was a C in foundations, they didn't even ask about midterm marks.

 

What factors mattered? Work experience pre-law school, volunteer experience outside of the ordinary SLS that everyone does, PERSONALITY/FIT and busting my ass to get what I wanted.

 

Total thread revival here, but just wondering if you care to elaborate on your volunteer experience outside of SLS that you think made a big difference? Thanks!

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Law show is really big locally, there are numerous clubs, the CBA always needs student volunteers. There's lots of volunteer options, many you won't find out about until you get started.

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