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All the actual classes will be scheduled, but you won't know what cohort you fall into unitl mid summer,so you don't know what time you'll start each day, etc.  Can be a good overview of the options though.  No classes friday first semester for 1Ls, assuming that holds up from previous years.

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All the actual classes will be scheduled, but you won't know what cohort you fall into unitl mid summer,so you don't know what time you'll start each day, etc.  Can be a good overview of the options though.  No classes friday first semester for 1Ls, assuming that holds up from previous years.

From the link above, it looks like Legal Research and Writing is on Fridays, both semesters (that is, if I'm reading it correctly - the formatting is hard to follow).

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 what should I do in 1L summer to maximize my chance at landing a 2L job in Vancouver?

 

Thanks for taking the time to do this. I really appreciate it!

 

 

Get good grades and have a good personality. I'm not kidding, OCIs pretty much come down to having good grades (try B+ n 1L) and then whether or not the firm thinks you are a good fit. Your resume can help as well but you aren't going to do anything in 1L that will compensate much for poor grades. Maybe try to have diverse ECs. Firms everywhere seem to like sports. Join the Hockey or Rugby team. Try SLS too. Beyond that, your resume isn't going to change much in 1L.

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From the link above, it looks like Legal Research and Writing is on Fridays, both semesters (that is, if I'm reading it correctly - the formatting is hard to follow).

THat's what i gathered too, but year the format is hard to follow

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From the link above, it looks like Legal Research and Writing is on Fridays, both semesters (that is, if I'm reading it correctly - the formatting is hard to follow).

 

You're right, and there are only 2 per semester instead of the usual 6.  So looks like changes are afoot.  That's too bad, having friday's off was really nice.

 

Edit: also, generally (but not always) your cohort will decide which of the sections for each class you are in.  So if you are in C1 for contracts, you will likely be in C1 for the others as well.  This doesn't always hold true though, but might let you get a glimpse of what the weekly schedule will be.

Edited by TKNumber3

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How much would you ballpark 1L books are going to cost?

I bought all of mine new because I need to mark them up as I read. It was around $900. To some extent it will depend on your prof and if you decide to buy supplementary texts.

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You could get them for less than $500 honestly. When you start, remember when the used book sale starts or go to the book store as early as possible and get the used ones that little or no highlighting/writing on them. Plus you can easily sell them next year.

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You could get them for less than $500 honestly. When you start, remember when the used book sale starts or go to the book store as early as possible and get the used ones that little or no highlighting/writing on them. Plus you can easily sell them next year.

I always found used books with handwriting and highlighting as the most useful because they saved you work (in undergrad at least) lol

Edited by NHH

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In general, I've found that sometimes not reading the textbook at all in a course and just focusing on the material the instructor provides, in the end provides superior performance (in terms of several different 400 level B LAW courses with Douglas Peterson). And since nowadays cases and summaries are all accessible electronically, I somewhat wonder what the true utility of a standard dense textbook even is. I was under the impression that they started moving away from traditional textbooks via course packs. It probably depends heavily on the specific instructor though and style of teaching. And probably on the learning style of the individual student too.

Edited by StudentLife

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In general, I've found that sometimes not reading the textbook at all in a course and just focusing on the material the instructor provides in the end provides superior performance (in terms of several different 4th year B LAW courses with Douglas Peterson). And since nowadays cases and summaries are all accessible electronically, I somewhat wonder what the true utility of a standard dense textbook even is. I was under the impression that they started moving away from traditional textbooks via course packs.

 

Are you in law school? I wouldn't use undergrad business law courses to make up any opinions on law courses. They are not anywhere close to being the same thing.

 

Its true that summaries are available. But one of the important skills you learn in 1L is knowing how to read a case from scratch and understanding it. At the very beginning, you should do this. Once you get how your prof approaches the class and cases and whats important/not important, you can stop reading and use CANs or class notes. 

 

Also I don;t know what ou mean by textbooks/course packs. In law, you have case books which are cases with some commentary and questions. Then there are textbooks which lay out the law. Both are helpful but usually casebooks are required. For something like Property Law, the textbook is very useful. Coursepacks are no different, its just a more tailored mix of textbook and case books.

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In general, I've found that sometimes not reading the textbook at all in a course and just focusing on the material the instructor provides, in the end provides superior performance (in terms of several different 400 level B LAW courses with Douglas Peterson). And since nowadays cases and summaries are all accessible electronically, I somewhat wonder what the true utility of a standard dense textbook even is. I was under the impression that they started moving away from traditional textbooks via course packs. It probably depends heavily on the specific instructor though and style of teaching. And probably on the learning style of the individual student too.

 

My undergrad included a spectrum of law courses (and a sizable stack of law textbooks). I found many of those books highly useful and absolutely could not have kept up in those classes without them. I found them a valuable resource for a number of reasons, the most significant being easy-to-access research resources and clear, easily searcheable citations. If, while writing a paper, you try to cite a piece of in-class material as a source, you're going to have a difficult time if your prof makes you chase the original source down. I preferred to go to the textbook for citations of summaries, and back to the case itself where necessary for specific points.

Edited by Buick

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My undergrad included a spectrum of law courses (and a sizable stack of law textbooks). I found many of those books highly useful and absolutely could not have kept up in those classes without them. I found them a valuable resource for a number of reasons, the most significant being easy-to-access research resources and clear, easily searcheable citations. If, while writing a paper, you try to cite a piece of in-class material as a source, you're going to have a difficult time if your prof makes you chase the original source down. I preferred to go to the textbook for citations of summaries, and back to the case itself where necessary for specific points.

Finding actual cases that were referenced in a textbook is pretty easy, and if you were writing a paper you would need to cite the actual case not the textbook. I'm not saying your experience is totally irrelevant, but I'd caution taking the advice of a 0L as gospel. I don't mean offence by this comment, you are obviously sharing what has worked for you but when your advice differs from those who have already completed a year or two of law school you can understand why you might get pushback.

 

I generally preferred courses that used a textbook that didn't include case excerpts, in conjunction with a course pack. The textbooks that are half cases half commentary never seemed as helpful to me, but this is obviously course dependent.

 

As for used textbooks, not only does the bookstore sell used books, but a student group holds a used book sale in the law building that can be even better than the bookstore options. So you can usually get your books for a decent price.

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Finding actual cases that were referenced in a textbook is pretty easy, and if you were writing a paper you would need to cite the actual case not the textbook. I'm not saying your experience is totally irrelevant, but I'd caution taking the advice of a 0L as gospel. I don't mean offence by this comment, you are obviously sharing what has worked for you but when your advice differs from those who have already completed a year or two of law school you can understand why you might get pushback.

 

I generally preferred courses that used a textbook that didn't include case excerpts, in conjunction with a course pack. The textbooks that are half cases half commentary never seemed as helpful to me, but this is obviously course dependent.

 

As for used textbooks, not only does the bookstore sell used books, but a student group holds a used book sale in the law building that can be even better than the bookstore options. So you can usually get your books for a decent price.

 

The references are easy enough to find, you're right - but as far as I know that would likely involve reading the text to some degree and not simply ignoring it on principle as stated by StudentLife.

 

No offense taken. As you said, I shared what worked for me. I specified it was an undergrad context (and therefore is far from being a direct analogy to a JD program). However, it is worth noting that I was not responding to an individual who has completed a year or two of law school. StudentLife indicated in previous posts that he was accepted to law school earlier this year.

 

Beyond all of that, I don't understand why a student in any academic program would pass up a resource directly related to their program of study.

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The references are easy enough to find, you're right - but as far as I know that would likely involve reading the text to some degree and not simply ignoring it on principle as stated by StudentLife.

 

No offense taken. As you said, I shared what worked for me. I specified it was an undergrad context (and therefore is far from being a direct analogy to a JD program). However, it is worth noting that I was not responding to an individual who has completed a year or two of law school. StudentLife indicated in previous posts that he was accepted to law school earlier this year.

 

Beyond all of that, I don't understand why a student in any academic program would pass up a resource directly related to their program of study.

 

Yea my bad I either misquoted or compounded two posts into one.  For some reason I thought you were the one stating skipping the texts was advisable, but I see you were responding to that earlier comment.  I think I got the quote vs comment thing confused somehow, wasn't enough coffee in me yet. Apologies. 

 

I do stand by the fact that actual cases are easy to be found, and citing a textbook is not a good idea.  Although it really isn't an option for most legal assignments, so it isn't like that would cause any issues for anyone reading it.  Anyway, back to our regular scheduled programming.

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If you feel the need to look into cases to get a head start, I'm sure someone can give you a list of some cases that will be covered in first year (read: feel free to message me if you want), but I wouldn't consider it at all necessary. There's also definitely a steep learning curve when it comes to reading cases, and certain judges can be harder to follow than others (McLaughlin's usually fairly easy to follow, even if you don't agree with her stance, but I'd avoid starting with Iaccabucci if possible, for example). 

 

I'm late to the game because I don't read individual school forums (other than UBC's) very regularly. But I wonder: Do we have a list of entry-level cases for eager 0Ls somewhere on this board? If not, we should come up with one. People often say not to read cases, but I think it can be kind of nice to get a hint of what you can expect. It might also help people decide if law school is something they would like.

 

Also, re SCC justices: Binnie! All Binnie, all the time!

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Absolutely, I agree that a text should be used as a "map" to sources, rather than a citation in itself.

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I'm late to the game because I don't read individual school forums (other than UBC's) very regularly. But I wonder: Do we have a list of entry-level cases for eager 0Ls somewhere on this board? If not, we should come up with one. People often say not to read cases, but I think it can be kind of nice to get a hint of what you can expect. It might also help people decide if law school is something they would like.

 

Also, re SCC justices: Binnie! All Binnie, all the time!

 

DICKSON!!!!! I LOVE DICKSON!!!!!!!! OMG DO I EVER LOVE DICKSON!!!!!!!! And Abella, she's pretty alright as well.

 

Re cases that 1Ls should read, the easiest ones the come to mind are any timely criminal appeals to the SCC as well as anything contract related written by Denning. The timely criminal ones because they're interesting, the legal issues at play are somewhat relatable in that they have to do with state checks on human behaviour, and are far more interesting than something like an SCC decision on remedial constructive trusts. Denning in contract because he's easy to read, a lot of his decisions espouse principles that you'll encounter in 1L, and contract law is one of the easiest to understand. As well, I just really enjoy shouting at ticket dispensers.

 

A partial list off the top of my head:

 

R v Fearon, Carter v Canada (AG), R v Morgentaler [1988], Donoghue v Stevenson, Brown v Board of Education (brilliant legal writing), Thornton v Shoe Lane Parking

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lists_of_landmark_court_decisions#Landmark_decisions_in_Canada

 

Also, I don't think there's anything wrong with citing texts. Courts do it. Don't see what is wrong with students doing it too. Besides, if you use a text as a roadmap, you're inevitably going to read what the text says about the case, in which case if you don't cite the text you're actually plagiarizing (unless, of course, you come up with a different interpretation than what the text).

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